Speeders beware, the police are going to be getting quite a bit faster. Ford has just announced that it will be offering its 3.5-liter, twin-turbocharged, EcoBoost V6 in the Explorer Police Interceptor. The new engine will be joining the existing 3.7-liter V6. The 365-horsepower, 350-pound-foot mill should be familiar to consumers as the powerplant that's found in the Ford Taurus SHO (and its LEO equivalent, the Taurus Police Interceptor) and the Ford Explorer Sport. It should also provide quite a kick in the pants to officers used to the naturally aspirated 3.7 and its 304 ponies and 279 pound-feet of torque.

The move to the more potent powerplant was born out of all the equipment officers need to carry on a day-to-day basis. These days, there's so much stuff that police need on a regular basis, that there's a genuine market for a faster Police Interceptor Utility, as it's known officially. The Explorer-based cruiser has already accounted for 68 percent of Ford's LEO sales thus far in 2014, and that's with just the 3.7, and we'd only expect that number to increase once the twin-turbo, 3.5-liter V6 is available. Ford won't offer up any indication of what the take rate will be on the new engine, but we're guessing it'll be fairly high.

The success of the Explorer PI couldn't have come at a better time for Ford. The decision to end Crown Victoria production was not a popular one with police, and combined with Chevrolet and Dodge diving into the LEO market feet first, Ford hasn't been performing as well as it's wanted to. The Explorer has been helping it turn around, though. And with the inclusion of the EcoBoost, Ford also has a legit competitor for the Chevrolet Tahoe on the big utility side of the police market.
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Hot-Selling Ford Police Interceptor Utility Vehicle Now Offers 365-Horsepower EcoBoost Engine

Ford adds 3.5-liter EcoBoost® utility vehicle model to Police Interceptor lineup to provide best-in-class horsepower and torque for police agencies

Since launch of the new Ford Police Interceptor products in 2012, the utility model accounts for half of the company's police vehicle sales


DEARBORN, Mich., Aug. 20, 2013 – Ford today announced police agencies will soon be able to order a Ford Police Interceptor utility vehicle with the 365-horsepower 3.5-liter EcoBoost® V6.

The engine, which delivers 350 lb.-ft. of torque, has been available in a variety of Ford vehicles, including the Police Interceptor sedan, and is the choice for more than 40 percent of Ford F-150 truck buyers.

"We continue to look at ways we can offer our customers additional product enhancements to further meet their unique needs," said Gerry Koss, Ford fleet marketing manager. "Our Police Advisory Board and customers across the country identified the EcoBoost engine as their No. 1 want in the Police Interceptor utility vehicle."

Agencies often need to outfit vehicles with an increasing amount of equipment, but still require first-responder, pursuit-capable performance and handling; the new Ford Police Interceptor utility vehicle is designed to meet these requirements.

"With the Police Interceptor utility vehicle representing half of our police orders, it is evident our two-vehicle strategy was on target," said Koss. "Our engineering team designed this vehicle specifically for the police market."

The Police Interceptor utility has received very positive feedback from law enforcement agencies, including the performance of the standard 3.7-liter Ti-VCT V6 engine, which delivers 304 horsepower and 279 lb.-ft. of torque, said Bill Gubing, chief engineer for Police Interceptor.

Gubing cited recently released results of Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department testing and evaluation of 2013 model year vehicles, which show Ford's Police Interceptor utility vehicle swept all categories, including acceleration, braking, 32-lap high-speed and pursuit versus the Chevrolet Tahoe equipped with a 5.3-liter V8 engine.

"The 3.5-liter EcoBoost will offer best-in-class performance and top-notch fuel economy," said Gubing. "That means law enforcement agencies that require this level of capability won't have to compromise.

"It also complements our strategy of offering a choice of either sedan or utility vehicle based on a common platform, and sharing a large amount of common components, including powertrains, brakes, wheels/tires, seats and maintenance items," Gubing added.

Lt. Charlie Powell, commander of fleet operations for Nevada Highway Patrol, said Ford "has made a good vehicle even more impressive" with the addition of the EcoBoost engine for the Police Interceptor utility vehicle. "This is good news," he said. "We at Nevada Highway Patrol look forward to putting this platform in the field as soon as practical."

Ford's Police Interceptor engine strategy provides a V6 lineup that outperforms V8 engines of years past. The Police Interceptor sedan is available with three powertrain options – a 3.5-liter V6 with front-wheel drive, 3.7-liter V6 with all-wheel drive and the powerhouse 3.5-liter V6 EcoBoost engine with all-wheel drive – allowing police to choose the powerplant that best meets their patrol requirements.

For more information on Ford Police Interceptor, visit www.FordPoliceInterceptor.com.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 40 Comments
      Dwight Bynum Jr.
      • 1 Year Ago
      Wait a minute... they didn't ALREADY come with an EcoBoost option?! I honestly assumed that was an option since day one. Oops.
      Avinash Machado
      • 1 Year Ago
      The Falcon would have been a nice replacement for the Crown Vic.
        rmt_1
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Avinash Machado
        If the Falcon was designed for Left Hand Drive, perhaps, but it wasn't. Now only the Australian police would know, if they still use them. I'm not sure, but I thought Holden had the police market cornered there, the way Ford's Crown Vic had it cornered here.
      rmt_1
      • 1 Year Ago
      Ford should call the Police Interceptor Utility with the EcoBoost V6 the "CHP Special". I believe the PIU was the only one of the new police cars to become available after the Crown Vic's end of production to pass the California Highway Patrol's extremely tough and unique test standards. The only problem they had with it was a lack of acceleration for quick highway merging from being parked near an on-ramp; the EcoBoost V6 will certainly fix that one issue.
      haz
      • 1 Year Ago
      This is a huge waste of taxpayer money!! Police were fine using sedans for decades, but now they all need SUVs because of unspecified "equipment"? What a joke. I see these things everywhere in dense urban areas around chicago. In this time of high gas prices, why do municipalities seem keen on pissing away taxpayer dollars like this? A midsize sedan would be much more suitable. If this was any other government work force there would be controversy about this abuse, but cops as usual get a free pass and the sheeple dont question authority.
        A P
        • 1 Year Ago
        @haz
        If you think a midsize sedan would be more suitable, then you known NOTHING about police work. One of the HUGE reasons CVPIs won a ton of contracts even after there were better performing cars on the the market was its ease of getting in and out of it (size dummy) and its huge trunk. So spare us the (cops are opressing us with their big cars) crap. You dont have a freaking clue as to what you are talking about.
          haz
          • 1 Year Ago
          @A P
          If a cop cant get in and out of a sedan (like they have done for DECADES) then he or she should be sitting behind a desk and not on patrol. It is not worth it for taxpayers to pay millions more so a cop doesnt have to bend his knees to get in a car that they sit in for hours at a time. Poor babies. Plenty of sedans with adequate trunk space. Gas isn't 99 cents anymore.
          JaredN
          • 1 Year Ago
          @A P
          Haz, try quickly getting in and out of a small car wearing a police equipment belt.
          John
          • 1 Year Ago
          @A P
          I have always owned small sporty cars. Trying to head to an off duty call in during an emergency with a gun belt & vest on in these cars simply sucks. You might aswell have a roll cage in the way. The crown vic & charger are a lot easier to get in and out of than even the current Taurus which on the inside feels very mid-sized unfortunately. Also, take a look in the back of a crown vic. Notice how tight it is back there with the divider. Now try and stuff a couple 6ft tall 250lb+ guys in the back.
        HPY
        • 1 Year Ago
        @haz
        Currently the utility only costs $1,500 more than the sedan if equipped with the same engine. The basic 3.7 utility is less than the ecoboost sedan. MPG is higher than the crown Vic. If someone wants to buy a explorer sport to have the same engine they will pay anywhere from $10,000 to $14,000 more than your local department for a patrol car.
          John
          • 1 Year Ago
          @HPY
          Ford actually bids out these vehicles as well so the MSRP or listed price is rarely what they're sold for. MPG on the other hand is fairly pointless. With auto idle shutdown systems and the means of use they typically all get decent mileage compared to their last generation counterparts. Thats one of the few things the new PPV's have over the old ones.
      The Wasp
      • 1 Year Ago
      "The move to the more potent powerplant was born out of all the equipment officers need to carry on a day-to-day basis." BS
        • 1 Year Ago
        @The Wasp
        [blocked]
      RobGcf
      • 1 Year Ago
      Yeah just what cops need. A big gas guzzling SUV. Sorry.. put 'em in hybrids or maybe Chevy Cruze diesels and save taxpayers some money. While we're at it, they can stop writing tickets simply because there's money in them (i.e. speeding) and spend more time actually going after UNSAFE drivers. Not like that'll happen though. Cops like to think they're at the top of the food chain. FWIW, I do like that it's the new Explorer and the Dodge Charger being pretty popular. Both are SUPER easy to spot at a distance. Even the Caprice is fairly easy to spot. I saw one of those this morning.
        jtav2002
        • 1 Year Ago
        @RobGcf
        I wouldn't consider this a "big gas guzzling SUV" especially with police using Tahoe's and Expeditions. This seems like a more reasonable option for those wanting an SUV setup for whatever reasons. A lot of departments in my area are utilizing these for their K9 officers while using sedans for all others.
        JaredN
        • 1 Year Ago
        @RobGcf
        The PI Explorer gets better fuel economy than the Crown Vic, and the higher h-point gives the officer better visibility.
          Wobb Les
          • 10 Months Ago
          @JaredN
          Have you driven one? This thing should never have been pursuit certified. It is an absolute terrifying experience to drive it in a curve even in the 35-50 mph range, the horrible rear visibility is probably gonna kill more than a few little kids and pets because you just cannot begin to see them, and to add insult to injury the straight line acceleration in the 0-60 range is so gutless virtually every car on the road can leave you in the dust. The thing is horrible. If Ford hadn't discontinued the Crown Vic and Chevy wasn't so clueless about their marketing to agencies NOBODY would be buying these except large metropolitan agencies like New York or Chicago that just don't ever have a need to get anywhere fast.
      dgazdfsdf badfhadf
      • 1 Year Ago
      I thought this was already an option! The 3.7 in that thing, while better than the 2.0L Ecoboost, is still a bit small if they actually want to do things with it, particularly acceleration. I'm legitimately surprised it took them this long to offer the ecoboost in the Explorer, considering it's the same vehicle as the Taurus... the same drivetrain, frame, and everything else. Ford what are you doing? I thought the gap between the CVPI and Interceptor were bad enough, just handing over contracts to Dodge for the Charger, all the while they've been trying to compete this unibody transverse-mounted V6 against the growing fleet of truck-framed Tahoes with V8s without even a Turbo.
        A P
        • 1 Year Ago
        @dgazdfsdf badfhadf
        The CHP did not buy Chargers again this year because they did not perform for them adequately. They are hard to get in and out of wearing all the modern officer has to wear and the trunk is not big enough. Ford won back the contract over MOPAR even though the Chargers performed a bit better on the track. Only dufussi on AB think that the only thing Police forces are interested in is acceleration and G forces. Front wheel drive cars (Impalas) have performed just fine over the years and so have TPI and EPIs.
          Oolly
          • 1 Year Ago
          @A P
          I've read that the CHP has a load carrying requirement that the Challenger doesn't meet. I think the Explorer is the only current vehicle offered to police that meets this long standing requirement. Lucky for Ford.
      dea5787
      • 1 Year Ago
      The CHP (California Highway Patrol) office down the street from my work has a few of these already. It\'ll take me a while to get used to seeing this in place of the Crown Vic. It just doesn\'t have the same menacing, indimidating look to me. But maybe that\'s just because the Crown Vic has such an extensive history already as a law enforcement vehicle. When I saw a regular Crown Vic on the roads driven by an elderly couple, it lost all of its indintimidation lol
        A P
        • 1 Year Ago
        @dea5787
        I am old enough to remember Polara's, Monacos and Coronets. They were very mean looking.
        Luke
        • 1 Year Ago
        @dea5787
        If you would've said CHiP with no explanation, I would've understood. Does that date me?
          dea5787
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Luke
          Haha. Not at all. I'm 26 years old and loved watching reruns of that show as a kid.
      avconsumer2
      • 1 Year Ago
      Yeesh. Here's hoping they're providing some additional cushioning in the seats. I find mine barely bearable for 3 hour trips, couldn't imagine pulling a duty shift. Probably force them on the rookie's.
        Scooter
        • 1 Year Ago
        @avconsumer2
        Most cops have enough natural cushioning on their rear ends to begin with.
          A P
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Scooter
          Tee Hee.....did you think of that yourself on the way to the donut store?
      Ethan Schmitt
      • 1 Year Ago
      but if they don't buy suvs where will they store their rpgs and light machine guns
      diffrunt
      • 1 Year Ago
      Police life-----99% sheer boredom , 1 % excitement. They live & prepare for the death defying excitement of a good chase. That's why an ignition zapper won't ever find a market. been there, done that.
      Scooter
      • 1 Year Ago
      Unfortunately we live in an age of rate increases across the board with little options. Honestly in all the Taurus and Explorer interceptor glory, all I see is more $$$ for Ford.
        Sportsnstuff Stuff
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Scooter
        THAT'S THE BEST PART ? UNLIKE GM WERE THEY BEG FOR MONEY FROM THE TAX PAYERS FORD BUILD CARS AND TRUCKS ANY WERE THEY LIKE WITH THERE OWN MONEY . GM TAKES OUR TAX MONEY AND PUTS MEXICANS AND CHINESE TO WORK .THEY TOOK OUR MONEY AND BUILT FACTORY'S IN THOSE COUNTRY'S ( WITH OUR TAX MONEY )
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