In late 2010, Volkswagen announced that it would spend the equivalent of $71 billion through 2015 to beef up its product lineup, determined to overtake Toyota in overall sales and profitability by 2018. Each of VW's many brands, in turn, would play its part contributing to a goal of 10 million sales per year. VW-owned Porsche was expected to sell 200,000 vehicles per year by 2018, but with the imminent arrival of the Macan small sport utility vehicle in 2014, the automaker is poised to meet that goal years ahead of schedule, Automotive News reports.

Porsche sold 143,096 cars in 2012, and IHS Automotive predicts Porsche will sell 63,000 Macans in 2014, according to Automotive News, which would make it the brand's best-selling vehicle. Do the math and you can see how Porsche could easily beat original expectations ahead of schedule. But Porsche's sales and marketing boss Bernhard Maier says not so fast: "We will not offer [63,000 Macans] in 2014 as we will still be ramping up production and introducing models top down," he told Automotive News Europe. Whether Porsche surpasses the 200,000 mark early or not, he said, the company will not set a new sales target and will remain committed to its business model.

The Macan shares its architecture with the Audi Q5, but Porsche will be able to charge more for its SUV. Tim Urquhart, a senior analyst at IHS Autmotive, told Automotive News that Porsche can charge 10 to 20 percent more, for what is basically the same SUV, than other VW Group brands. How's that for brand value?

If you think that's a cool trick, then take a look at the first-half 2013 operating profits and the number of cars sold for Volkswagen, Audi and Porsche. VW, the high-volume manufacturer, sold 2.4 million vehicles and made a profit of 1.5 billion euros ($2 billion). Audi, a relatively low-volume manufacturer, sold 692,000 cars and made 2.6 billion euros ($3.5 billion). Porsche, with even lower volume still, sold 78,000 vehicles and profited 1.3 billion euros ($1.7 billion)! On average, VW profited about $830 per car, Audi made $5,000 per car, but Porsche takes the cake, profiting a whopping $22,190 per car sold.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 52 Comments
      Chumley
      • 1 Year Ago
      I agree with a few of the others - it actually looks pretty good and is MUCH better looking than the Cayenne. I don't quite get the pricing though. Sounds like it's going to "start" around the same as the Cayenne?! I'm guessing the best looking, well equipped versions will be $65k or more....
        sparrk
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Chumley
        How do you know how much the Macan will cost ? I think it will be priced between the Q5 and the Cayenne.
          Chumley
          • 1 Year Ago
          @sparrk
          Then we're both right! One article said it would likely be "considerably" more than the Q5's $36k-$45k pricing, another said starting around $45k. Which, to me says even the lease special entry level one will be $50k'ish and in typical Porsche fashion - well equipped ones can achieve nose-bleed prices.
      budwsr25
      • 1 Year Ago
      People who buy brand new porsches must loading those cars up with the 5k seats the 100% leather and carbon interior and dont forget the dashboard stop watch/clock. I think AUDI needs to get in the À la carte option business to pull that kind of profit.
      mchica
      • 1 Year Ago
      These things are going to be everywhere.
      Teleny411
      • 1 Year Ago
      I usually hate crossovers and find the Cayenne kind of ugly, but this one is pretty cool. The Porsche design language works better on this chassis.
        48Chevy
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Teleny411
        I'm with you on this. My only concern is the design below the headlamps. I know big, black plastic maws are the "in look" nowadays (Audi, Ford, ugh!), but, I hope Porsche considers something a bit more proportional and higher-end looking.
      The Wasp
      • 1 Year Ago
      I wonder how many of those predicted 63,000 Macan sales will come from would-be Q5 or Tiguan buyers.
        gary
        • 1 Year Ago
        @The Wasp
        The bigger question is how many of the 63000 Macan sales will come from would-be Cayenne buyers?
        Matt
        • 1 Year Ago
        @The Wasp
        I don't think there are any Tiguan buyers, at least not with the current gen. I bet less than 5% of prospective Macan/Cayenne buyers know that their crossover is nearly identical to the Q5/Touareg.
      Jasonn
      • 1 Year Ago
      I can't get over the fact that porche makes $22,000 per car! I would like to see an overview of the market and see exactly who makes the most per car and who makes the least...
        Bradford
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Jasonn
        Porsche is #1 on that list.
          Cayman
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Bradford
          I'm going to go out on a limb and say Porsche is not #1. The manufacturer with the largest margin on their cars is going to be a profitable company with very low volumes. Lambo, McClaren, and Ferrari are far more likely to top the list. Also, it all depends on how you do the accounting. Do you attribute all money spent on racing across all vehicles? How about the R/D for halo cars?
          sparrk
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Bradford
          @ Cayman , Porsche sold 20 times more cars than Ferrari in 2012. Let's say they have the same R&D costs and the cheaper Porsche models sold ( the Boxster/Cayman , base Cayenne and base 911 ) are covering the R&D costs. You then remain with the 911 turbo/S, Panamera Turbo/S, Cayenne turbo/S which are extremely profitable and those alone are sold more than all Ferrari models combined. I think these models are very close, if not more profitable per car than Ferrari.
      pawelrirl
      • 1 Year Ago
      TEST
      Cameron Huntsucker
      • 1 Year Ago
      At first I was thinking "OMG who approved those headlights????" but then I realized they're just a photosticker over the real thing. Whew. Now, here's to hoping the taillights are fake as well, just like that hilarious c-pillar re-paint. Kinda funny - it totally looked like a CRV for a second.
      ground
      • 1 Year Ago
      "Porsche can charge 10 to 20 percent more, for what is basically the same SUV, than other VW Group brands. How's that for brand value?" What a crock of sh*t comment. Go drive a q7 an a touareg and then compare to a cayenne. The cayenne is in a totally different league for handling and driving feel. Porsche can charge more because their cars are way more sorted. Its actually worth the difference if you care about that kind of thing.
        • 1 Year Ago
        @ground
        [blocked]
        Matt
        • 1 Year Ago
        @ground
        They all "feel" like massively heavy family haulers riding way off the ground. Being the best-handling 2.5 ton crossover is like winning gold at the special olympics.
          Cayman
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Matt
          @GVIrish I agree with pretty much everything there, but I wouldn't diminish the off-road capabilities of the Cayenne. I realize that very few will really be pushed off-road, but it's actually pretty capable. It's not just a station wagon with an SUV body.
          GVIrish
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Matt
          By that logic, anything other than a hardcore 2-seat sports car is a waste of time. I mean, why bother with a 3600 pound barge like a M3 or a Mustang Boss 302 when you could buy a Lotus Elise for that money? Neither an M3 or Mustang will ever match the handling or feel of something more focused like a Lotus. But of course, some people prefer a sports car that is a bit more practical, or maybe a bit more luxurious, or better at the strip. In the case of sport SUV's, yeah it's not as rugged as the typical 4wd body-on-frame suv with a transfer case, but it doesn't need to be. Maybe that customer wants something that haul the kids, occassionally tow something, and is still fast and fun to drive. It's not for everyone, but it's far from a stupid idea.
      FutureDoc
      • 1 Year Ago
      If it funds better "real" Porsches, fine. Just do not turn up at a Porsche owner's club meeting... you bought the wrong car.
        The Wasp
        • 1 Year Ago
        @FutureDoc
        Remember when people said that about the Panamera? See what kind of vehicles the Panamera has funded? If this is a hit, it definitely won't be the last questionable Porsche.
          Cayman
          • 1 Year Ago
          @The Wasp
          For what it's worth, the Panamera drives friggin fantastic (as long as you don't get the base engine). I had the GTS on a track it drove great and sounded even better.
          GVIrish
          • 1 Year Ago
          @The Wasp
          Porsche exists in a slightly different space than McLaren and Ferrari. Looking at their histories, Porsche has always been more mass market and attainable than Ferrari. Porsche has never really been about purposefully limiting production to drive up exclusivity, but as a result they have to sell more cars to turn a profit, rather than charging very high prices like Ferrari. The 911 has always been more of an everyman's sports car. A bit like the Corvette in a way. But what that means is that there are excellent Porsches that far more people have a hope of driving one day. The average car enthusiast will never have the opportunity to own a Ferrari (unless it is 25+ years old) but I know a lot of people who can afford a Cayman or 911. I just bought a Cayman actually. As for the Macan funding other cars, yeah maybe Porsche could swing that mid-engined supercar (the 458 fighter) without volume models like the Cayenne, Macan, Boxster/Cayman and Panamera. But even a mild down turn in demand for that car, or an overrun in cost could make things financially dicey for Porsche. With the volume models Porsche has more money to take more risks, and develop new technology.
          The Wasp
          • 1 Year Ago
          @The Wasp
          @GVIrish The 918 is pretty awesome but look at the two other manufacturers you mentioned: Ferrari and Mclaren. Do they sell tarted up CUVs? No, they do not. Porsche is part of a much bigger company than Mclaren and maybe Fiat (?). They do not need to make the Macan to finance exotic racecars that, by the way, are only sold to handful of people anyway.
          GVIrish
          • 1 Year Ago
          @The Wasp
          Well we have the 918 and the forthcoming 458/MP4-12C fighter. Those count for something no?
      Matt
      • 1 Year Ago
      Audi engineers design all VAG crossovers, just like Porsche engineers design all the VAG sports cars (which is why the R8 is so awesome). The Macan/Cayenne don't get any magic Porsche "special sauce"; they are literally designed by the same guys that design the Q5/Touareg. They just throw some new lights/grille on the outside, some plastic bits on the inside, and change the spring/damper rates and steering ratio, then watch suckers pay a huge premium.
        ground
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Matt
        you are talking out your neck.. just go drive a cayenne and q7 back to back... no comparison. The q7 wallows and feels numb and big. The cayenne feels much more car like and lithe. The cayenne has A LOT of unique part numbers.. its NOT just badge engineering. You are stating opinion for fact.
          Matt
          • 1 Year Ago
          @ground
          Q7 is the wrong comparison, since it's a different class of vehicle (same platform though). The Cayenne and Touareg are built on the same assembly line, designed by the same engineers, with the same base powerplants, transmission, door sheet metal, weight distribution, drivetrain, etc. The Porsche has better interior materials/seats and slightly more aggressive springs/dampers/steering.
        LouCypher
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Matt
        Porsche had nothing to do with the R8. The car it shares its underpinnings with is the Lamborghini Gallardo.
          Matt
          • 1 Year Ago
          @LouCypher
          You're right, but the next R8 will be designed by Porsche engineers: http://www.motorauthority.com/news/1080149_2015-audi-r8-wont-borrow-porsche-platform-report
        sparrk
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Matt
        @ Matt, you're wrong if you think the Cayenne and Touareg are the same car with other interior. Very wrong.
      rtkewley
      • 1 Year Ago
      As Ferdinand Porsche rotates in his grave at about 9000 rpm...
        Cayman
        • 1 Year Ago
        @rtkewley
        You mean the guy who designed countless trucks, the first 4 wheel drive car and many of the tanks used by the Nazis in WWII?
          sparrk
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Cayman
          And tractors. And his dream was to build cheap cars for the masses, like his buddy Henry Ford.
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