If you're aching to get the new, seventh-generation Chevrolet Corvette Stingray, be prepared to deal with ransom demands. On the lead up to the hugely anticipated C7's arrival in dealers, Automotive News is reporting that some dealers have already tacked on a little extra to the Stingray's MSRP.

Price gouging, particularly on a car that's as eagerly awaited as the Corvette Stingray shouldn't be a huge shock, but that makes it no less of a disturbing trend. No wonder some folks want to do away with dealers all together. As AN points out, the markups can mean a load of cash coming into dealers, but in the case of one California dealership that quoted the owner of a Volt (which was a victim of price gouging itself) at $10,000 above the Stingray's sticker price, it can also alienate previous customers that are anxious to add a C7 to their stable, leading to a permanent loss of business.

Not all dealers are bad guys, though. AN goes on to quote, via email, the Corvette sales manager at a leading Columbus, OH Chevy dealer, saying, "Guys who go above sticker - that's a one-shot deal. These are customers who you're going to see again, and they'll remember that. I'm looking at the bigger picture." Hear, hear.

Still, a lot of dealers don't see it that way. Automotive News spoke to an anonymous dealer in the western US (yes, they're so anonymous we don't even have a state) that is planning on gouging based on reports from mystery shoppers that have seen prices range from $10,000 to $20,000 above the Corvette's $51,995 MSRP.


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  • 142 Comments
      mikeybyte1
      • 1 Year Ago
      This is just like the price gouging when the Tesla Model S came out. Oh wait. That's right. Tesla doesn't use dealers which angered the NADA. So the car sold at a standard price. Everywhere. And it was not jacked up. They wonder why dealers have a bad rap. And spare me the "supply and demand and capitalism" speech. It is greed and price gouging by the middle man, pure and simple. The same thing happened when the PT Cruiser came out, then a few years later they couldn't give those cars away. I doubt the Vette will suffer that fate. But to me this just points out why the dealership model needs to go away. I am all for making a buck, but make an honest buck. Many dealers do not.
        Jason
        • 1 Year Ago
        @mikeybyte1
        Tesla should play by the same rules as everyone else. However, I think the rules should be changed for everyone. I'm not naive enough to think it will ever happen. But the distinct lack of the control for the OE to manage their customer experience and the sales of their products is the largest remaining major problem for the car makers here in the US.
        Feurig
        • 1 Year Ago
        @mikeybyte1
        If you don't like the price, don't buy the car. The price wouldn't be there unless there were people to pay it. You can't call adjusting market prices "greed." All businesses are there to make money.
      RCinAZ
      • 1 Year Ago
      I work with a big Chevy dealer in the Phoenix area that has no intention of marking up the Stingrays he's getting - he thinks like that dealer in Columbus, OH. Repeat and referral business can be huge for a dealership and they know this.
      KingTito
      • 1 Year Ago
      I am definitely not a dealer defender. Can\'t stand most of them that I have bought cars from over the years. However, the acronym MSRP means just that, suggested. You can fault a dealer for not taking a long term of view of what they are doing. You can fault them for whatever you want. However, people end up paying these premiums and, therefore, it is what the market will bear. Like has been said before, this premium will be gone very quickly. It is not as though this car is a limited production car.
      Bradford
      • 1 Year Ago
      There's a CDJR dealership right by me, and they markup their Vipers by about $30k. Honestly, it is pretty shady, but no one is being held ransom. If you don't think it is worth that extra money, then either negotiate it down or don't buy from them.
        godwhomismike
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Bradford
        When I see that, I assume are doing mark-ups across the board, but where the average consumer doesn't notice it. Like they take $500 off the sticker of the vehicle, then overcharge all of the fees, and add in one or two dealership fees costing the buyer an extra $800-$1000. So now that Dodge Dart buys just paid $300-$500 over sticker price without even realizing it.
          Feurig
          • 1 Year Ago
          @godwhomismike
          Maybe some places do what you're saying, but I can tell you there are two "fees" you're paying no matter what dealership you go to. The "doc fee" and the "pack." The pack is hidden and is put on the cost of the vehicle before the mark-up. Not even the managers know how much the car is packed. It's meant for space to account for details, gas, and perhaps lot damage. The other is the "doc fee" which is pure profit for the dealership. Every dealership has one.
      throwback
      • 1 Year Ago
      Supply and demand, simple economics. If vette buyers simply refuse to pay the markup, prices will drop. If however you HAVE to be the first on your block with a Vette be prepared to pay up. I have never paid above list price for any car (not sure if I have ever paid list price) so I would wait until year 2 or 3 if I was in the market.
        Pat
        • 1 Year Ago
        @throwback
        Same reason why gas prices go up when a sunny and warm week-end approaches!
      Chayil
      • 1 Year Ago
      About all a person can do is to tell a dealership that is excessively marking up premium cars like the Corvette that you will NEVER buy any vehicle from them in the future. There are honest dealers out there that will sell cars like this for MSRP. Back in the 1960's, you could buy any Muscle Car for what the window sticker said. In fact, you could dicker and bring the price down if you were good. Then, in the later 1970's, cars like the RX7 began to command a surcharge above the window price. I was going to buy an RX7 in 1979, but they wanted 2k over the sticker price, which was huge back then. Till this day, i refuse to buy any cars from that same family owned business of dealerships and I have told them so on many occasions. Do they care? Probably not. But, when they see me driving a new car from a competitor's dealership, they will know that many of us have long memories. I have bought cars online through Autotrader and have been very happy because I got the price I wanted.
      Peter DePriest
      • 1 Year Ago
      A few years ago my local Ford dealer got at GT500 and had a $20k markup. Even with so called high demand It sat on the lot for several months. I was definitely not in the market for it, but if I was any price gouging like that would turn me away instantly.
        waetherman
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Peter DePriest
        He probably could have sold four of them in the same time if he'd just been willing to sell at sticker price.
          MAX
          • 1 Year Ago
          @waetherman
          He couldn't get 4, it was a limited production model. Besides having this "halo" car around helped showroom traffic and customers thinking up Mustangs, et.
      Gator
      • 1 Year Ago
      Haha, I don't get people. Why not wait it out and buy it at sticker or less. You guys blame dealers for ripping people, but it's really the people who are getting ripped who are to blame. I agree dealers ******* suck, but shoppers are just as much at fault.
      BLS
      • 1 Year Ago
      There is any easy way that you can get above sticker and still look like a good guy. Just put the cars on eBay. If the customers want this Vette now then they will pay out the nose. If they are willing to wait. They can come in put a deposit down and order it with the options that they want.
        carnut0913
        • 1 Year Ago
        @BLS
        I think most dealers will go this route as it is the internet-savvy way to achieve the same goal- priced for market demand. Marking it up to minimize demand is the old way. Package this with a charity donation of x% above MSRP and the dealer would all of a sudden be a hit and still make a huge profit
      Jacel
      • 1 Year Ago
      The GTO was DOA because of the gouging of dealers and short quantities. The good thing about the c7 is that chevy is going to produce this thing in high high numbers.
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Jacel
        [blocked]
      Curtimack
      • 1 Year Ago
      Manufacturers should be able to limit this from happening. Just one more instance where an individual GREEDY DEALER can give the brand a bad name!
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
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