Tasers, while technically non-lethal devices, are not to be messed with. Just ask a police officer that's been tased in the name of training. Besides the crippling pain brought on by the electric shock, tasers can induce a number of heart conditions, up to and including heart attacks, while a 2008 study by Amnesty International determined that 334 deaths had been caused by tasers from 2001 to 2008 in the US alone. Like we said, it's not a toy.

Which makes the plight of Bradley Jones so awful. Over a nine-month period, Jones was snuck up on and tased by his co-workers at Fred Fincher Motors in Houston over two dozen times. To make matters worse, it was videotaped and posted on YouTube, purportedly by the dealership's owner, Sam Harless.

Jones is no longer with Fincher Motors and has, not surprisingly, lawyered up. He's filed suit against Harless and his wife, Texas State Representative Patricia Harless, who was part owner of the dealership. Jones has also singled out two other co-workers in his suit. He accuses the four of assault and battery and failure to provide a safe work place.

With the evidence shown on this news clip, we think he may have a pretty sound case. Scroll down for the full video from KHOU Houston.


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 736 Comments
      Technoir
      • 1 Year Ago
      A crime against this employee has been committed, it's crystal clear and the evidence is there to prove it. The employees who did this, and the manager, must be incredibly stupid men for not only doing this, but then posting it online. I hope they pay for their idiocy and cruelty.
      ammca66564
      • 1 Year Ago
      If the idiot owner who calls this frivolous would like to prove the point by being personally, repeatedly tasered on camera, I'd be glad to watch on YouTube.
      olan5tops
      • 1 Year Ago
      That is one of the worst cases of life-threatening bullying I've seen. If that man had had a pace maker or insulin pump, which keep people strong and healthy, he could have died. Adults bully each other too at times, and it needs to stop.
        Richard
        • 1 Year Ago
        @olan5tops
        And borders on assault.
        silverraven06
        • 1 Year Ago
        @olan5tops
        Had it been up in Ak it would've been assault, I hope he wins, that is no way to treat an employee.
      rkeeeballs
      • 1 Year Ago
      .....Myself, after two, no more than three times.......there would be a Louisville Slugger next to my desk.....yup.
      Mark Forister
      • 1 Year Ago
      He should press criminal assault charges against each person who tasered him, and for each time they tasered him.
      Velocity105
      • 1 Year Ago
      Doesn't look like they wanted him working there. What kind of monsters not only taser a guy but keep the taser against his body for at least 5 seconds? He was screaming in agony in the second half of the video. I hope he closes the dealership in bankruptcy with his award and the 3 named in the suit go to jail for assault with a deadly weapon. How disturbing that anyone would do this.
      chromal
      • 1 Year Ago
      Goes to show, some people never develop beyond their emotionally stunted 11-year-old-bully selves. Shame this guy was subjected to that. Shame that it wasn't handled appropriately by the employer. Appropriate that they now may owe him a lot.
        Bill
        • 1 Year Ago
        @chromal
        Yep. These are the guys for whom high school was the pinnacle of their life. They never leave their home town, wear their varsity football jackets into their 30's, and then go to work at the local car dealership or sell real estate.
        JD444
        • 1 Year Ago
        @chromal
        Go to the mall and look at the fathers and sons. Most fathers are dressed like their kids. They look like wannabe rappers, or an overweight and short basketball player, or a wannabe Scarface thug. The actual fathers can't grow up. How can they raise childeren.
          SquareFour
          • 1 Year Ago
          @JD444
          Yep, exactly. People sometimes like to poke fun at hunters, and even fishers, as "rednecks," but there's a ritualistic tradition there passed down from father figure to son that's so much more valuable than showing your kid how to be a conspicuous consumer. In most cases it builds an understanding in the child of the most important, and often difficult, fact of life: life eats life. Food doesn't really come from some magical world where it's delivered prepackaged and sanitized. Behind all of that, something has to die. Whether it's fauna or flora, something has to die. That simple realization leads to another, we too will one day die. Sure, we all know that, but we don't fully realize it until we see it. Farming/ranching teaches the same thing. Anyway, lessons like the one above force us psychologically into adulthood. There's also self-sufficiency involved there. Learning to fend for yourself in a very real way. Learning how to fix/build things also teaches that, and it gives you confidence in your own abilities which prepares you for the competitive nature of the modern world of business, as well as instilling the true value of money and a good idea of the difference between enjoyment and waste. Playing organized sports can teach you some of this, but when all is said and done, it's still just playing a game. It doesn't have quite the psychological impact as hunting, farming, ranching, repairing or building.
          SquareFour
          • 1 Year Ago
          @JD444
          Carpinions, You actually missed my "point" entirely. I'm talking about "knowing" in a psychological way. We all want to say we know this and we know that, but the person who thinks/says they know, doesn't know. The hunting was just an example of how we learn to know certain things without thought--it's a difficult concept, so don't worry too much if you don't get it--and wasn't a recommendation we should all hunt with our kids. There's also fishing, farming/ranching, gardening, etc. As I pointed out, there are other ways to teach boys (and girls) these same things. And yes, people who hunt have been doing stupid immature things for eons, but there are numerous reasons for that, and it would be a gross generalization to say all hunters are that way. Learning to hunt/fish/farm (grow things) are just part of the equation. There are plenty of other things necessary to forming an adult male, but gaining that deep realization that life eats life is a very important part of it. And the state of modern American males certainly does point to a definite problem with boys not fully maturing into men. BTW, you have no idea what "troglodytic" means.
          Carpinions
          • 1 Year Ago
          @JD444
          I think you're criticizing how they dress, not that the kids look like the parents. They did decades ago too, the attire was just different.
          Carpinions
          • 1 Year Ago
          @JD444
          SquareFour, plenty of men doing manly things have played practical jokes on each other and gotten themselves maimed or killed WITH the coming-of-age experiences behind them. Even in first grade I knew where the chicken on my plate came from, as will my kids. I didn't need to see someone wring a bird's neck, let alone do it myself, to figure it out. Your point is a rather troglodytic one that assumes every boy must necessarily go through those things to become a properly prepared adult. It frankly isn't true. We haven't lived in an agrarian, hunter-gatherer society for quite some time, and that's a good thing.
        SquareFour
        • 1 Year Ago
        @chromal
        My thoughts as well. There's a real problem in the U.S. with men who've never really graduated to adulthood. From the declining rate of men going to college, to the increasing amount of men over 25 living with their parents to the somewhat recent phenomenon of men collecting toys from their childhood (apparently men are beginning to become the main customers of action figures like G.I. Joe, Transformers and Star Wars). Joseph Campbell called this 40-50 years ago when he realized modern society had lost the rituals needed to let a boy know he's now a man, sometimes literally transforming a boy into a man. He talked about how nature handles the transition form girlhood to womanhood through menstruation, but beyond growing hair in surprising places, that doesn't really happen for boys. There has to be a psychological transformation combined with the physical. Many cultures used to have ceremonies where boys were taken away from their mothers by the men of the community and taught what it means to be a man. Hell, as late as the early 20th century, boys had to graduate from short pants to long. Nowadays, if we're lucky, our fathers give us a helping hand into manhood, and hopefully it goes beyond some lame attempt at a "birds and bees" chat. My dad taught me how to shave, how to build things, how to be self-sufficient and how to bear the burden of being a provider. He even taught me how to drink (ie, know when to quit, don't let it cloud your judgement). These were all lessons that transformed me psychologically. With each lesson, I changed. Many boys now don't even get the shaving lessons, let alone the other stuff.
      jf.bouchard
      • 1 Year Ago
      Do to others as you would have them do to you. His colleagues forgot the golden rule and it led to this mess.
      SquareFour
      • 1 Year Ago
      The people asking why this guy didn't just quit aren't putting themselves in his shoes. In a down economy, with a scarcity of jobs, and a family to provide for, you suddenly find yourself hanging onto what you have...even if that's a horrible job. I honestly can't say what I would've done in his position. I'd like to say I'd film it myself, call the police and press charges...but I can't be sure of that. The idea of being being homeless/letting down your family can cause you to endure some nasty stuff. As for these turds, I hope the two sales-jerks serve some jail time, the owner goes bankrupt paying a hefty dollar amount in damages, has to sell the business to someone more ethically-minded so jobs are preserved and his wife's political career is ruined.
        • 1 Year Ago
        @SquareFour
        [blocked]
          Eduardo Maal
          • 1 Year Ago
          You have no idea what its like to be tased. Look for videos online. Anyway, the law is clear; there's a statute of limitations of 2 years if I'm not mistaken. And you can't KNOW its purely sour grapes, you don't even know the guy.
          captainpaintball
          • 1 Year Ago
          The "smiling cop" was not there for all of the stun gun incidents, I am certain. Most people's reaction to seeing it for the first and only time would be nervous laughter of some sort, and not know the whole history of these incidents. The victim does not seem like the kind of person who would be willing to cause a scene when customers are around, let alone be able to fend off 3-5 people at a time if he was to escalate it to punches--after being stunned, no less! I'm sure your boyfriend could, (and you most certainly could, at the least, grab your balls and whip them out) but not everyone is made of the same stuff as you guys.
      Kimberly
      • 1 Year Ago
      He seems to be now experiencing Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. People need to be held accountable for their actions!
      msharvie
      • 1 Year Ago
      If anyone needs to be sued, its these four people. Shoot for the moon Mr. Jones and set an example for any future pranksters.
      aec328
      • 1 Year Ago
      2 Dozen times? I would have called the police and hired a personal injury attorney after the first attack. Why did it take a termination for him to take action? Bet these men were bullies in school as well.
    • Load More Comments
    Advertisement
    2014 Jeep Cherokee
    MSRP: $22,995 - $30,095
    2015 Mercedes-Benz E-Class
    MSRP: $51,800 - $103,200
    2014 Chevrolet Cruze
    MSRP: $17,520 - $24,985