General Motors' Cadillac division has always prided itself on its super-quiet cars, so the General's promotion of its "ultrasonic" welding technique for the upcoming ELR extended-range plug-in may or may not make sense, depending on how you define the term. In this case, GM says the ultrasonic welding allows machines to put together metal electrode tabs on the car's 16.5-kWh lithium-ion battery pack through rapid motion that creates heat through friction. Most importantly, it eliminates the need to get temperatures up to metal-melting point to do the job. Yes, that's the extremely simplified version of the process, which has been used for a while in the medical and aerospace and if also employed on the Chevrolet Volt.

Either way, GM is looking for some good advance buzz for the ELR. The car has a 435-pound battery that provides as many as 35 miles of electric-only range. The first production model rolled of the automaker's Michigan assembly line (for testing purposes, mind you) in May on the way for the ELR to start sales early next year. Read Caddy's press release below.
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Cadillac ELR Goes Ultrasonic in Pursuit of High Quality
Welding and monitoring process supports eight-year/100,000-mile warranty

2013-08-02

DETROIT – Ultrasonic welding, a high-tech manufacturing process used in the aerospace and medical industries, is helping ensure high quality for the new Cadillac ELR extended-range electric luxury coupe that goes on sale in North America in early 2014.

Ultrasonic welding's key advantage is exceptional and predictable quality and performance from one battery pack to the next. Every ELR battery, for example, has close to 200 ultrasonic welds. Each is required to meet stringent quality requirements, enabling Cadillac to offer an eight-year/100,000-mile battery system warranty.

Short cycle times, low capital costs and manufacturing flexibility through the use of automation are other advantages of ultrasonic welding.

"Ultrasonic welding is a far superior joining technology in applications where it can be deployed," said Jay Baron, president and CEO of the Center for Automotive Research in Ann Arbor, Mich. "Cadillac's innovative process will produce batteries with superior quality compared with traditional methods – and do it more efficiently. This is one example of technology development that is becoming pervasive in today's world class vehicles."

General Motors' Brownstown Battery Assembly plant near Detroit, uses ultrasonic welding to join metal electrode tabs on ELR's advanced 16.5-kWh lithium-ion battery system, and does it with a proprietary quality monitoring process. Brownstown uses an automated system to execute millions of these welds each year.

Ultrasonic welding uses specialized tools called an anvil and horn to apply rapid mechanical vibrations to the battery's copper and aluminum electrodes. This creates heat through friction, resulting in a weld that does not require melting-point temperatures or joining material such as adhesives, soldering or fasteners.

An integrated camera vision system is used to shoot a reference image of the weld area prior to the operation to achieve pinpoint accuracy. Quality operators check electrode tabs before and after welding, and the system monitors dozens of signal processing features during each weld.

The battery-specific welding process is a result of collaboration among General Motors' Manufacturing Systems Research Lab and Advanced Propulsion Center and the Brownstown plant. GM first applied the process on the award-winning Chevrolet Volt – its groundbreaking extended-range electric vehicle – and further refined it for ELR.

"This effort is an outstanding example of teamwork between research and manufacturing engineering," said Catherine Clegg, GM vice president of Global Manufacturing Engineering. "It has helped integrate the use of highly technical, complex technology into a sustainable manufacturing process, which means we can consistently deliver high-quality batteries to our customers for the Cadillac ELR."

The ELR's T-shaped battery pack is located along the centerline of the vehicle, between the front and rear wheels for optimal weight distribution. The 5.5-foot-long (1.6 m), 435-pound (198 kg) pack supplies energy to an advanced electric drive unit capable of 295 lb-ft of instant torque (400 Nm) to propel the vehicle. Using only the energy stored in the battery, the ELR will deliver a GM-estimated range of about 35 miles (56 km) of pure electric driving, depending on terrain, driving techniques and temperature.

Charging the ELR's battery can be done with a 120V electrical outlet or a dedicated 240V charging station. The vehicle can be completely recharged in about 4.5 hours using a 240V outlet, depending on the outside temperature.

The Cadillac ELR is built at GM's Detroit-Hamtramck Assembly Plant, one of the few high-volume electric vehicle manufacturing facilities based in the U.S. Its battery pack is built from cell to pack at Brownstown and shipped to Detroit-Hamtramck for assembly into the vehicle.

About Cadillac
Cadillac has been a leading luxury auto brand since 1902. Today Cadillac is growing globally, driven by an expanding product portfolio featuring dramatic design and technology. More information on Cadillac appears at www.cadillac.com. Cadillac's media website with information, images and video can be found at media.cadillac.com.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 10 Comments
      CoolWaters
      • 2 Days Ago
      BEST Looking, Smartest Cadillac to buy.
        EZEE
        • 2 Days Ago
        @CoolWaters
        But seriously...do you (or anyone) know if they have announced the price? Hopefully with the Volt having a price cut, this thing won't be scary expensive...if it hits $60K I am thinking Tesla instead...
          pag@optusnet.com.au
          • 2 Days Ago
          @EZEE
          @ EZEE WTF ! First comments start being deleted for no real reason, then appear under different names ! ( Apologies from Marcopolo)
          pag@optusnet.com.au
          • 2 Days Ago
          @EZEE
          Ezee, It's time American started respecting their premium luxury brands. Cadillac should be priced to rival the very most expensive of the European and Japanese production models. A 60k Cadillac is not a real Cadillac, just an upmarket Chevrolet ! GM should put the emulate Toyota, and put the resources behind it's Cadillac marque, (as it once did) to compete with Mercedes, BMW, Lexus (even Bentley and Rolls Royce, head on for build quality, luxury and technical excellence. You want a $60,000-70,000 car , buy a Buick ! GM should restore it's old brand names, (Oldsmobile and Pontiac) and recapture the luxury, up-spec market. Outside of California, the EV Tesla and GM's EREV Cadillac's will find different buyers. A supposed rivalry between the two marques simply won't exist . (except in the fevered imagination of ABG readers).
          PeterScott
          • 2 Days Ago
          @EZEE
          I think the Base Model S is very much a "real-world drive away config". Even if there is $10K difference between the ELR and Model S, that isn't exactly what I call breathing room. Once you get to $60K cars, people aren't stretching themselves financially to buy them (unless they are complete morons), so moving to $70K is not that big of a deal.
          kEiThZ
          • 2 Days Ago
          @EZEE
          Model S is probably closer to $75k with the tax credit in any sort of real-world drive away config. If they can get the driveaway config price with the tax credit down to about $60k, they will definitely have room to breathe till Tesla puts out Gen III. $15k buys lots of gas and maintenance.
        EZEE
        • 2 Days Ago
        @CoolWaters
        Its so smart it can do calculus and sh*t
      diffrunt
      • 2 Days Ago
      "GM is looking for some good advance buzz for the ELR. The car has a 435-pound battery that provides as many as 35 miles of electric-only range." Wow! Nothing like the latest & greatest tech for the GM "flagship" reVOLTing !
      ss1591
      • 2 Days Ago
      I have had my Volt for over a year now and drive it like I would any other car "I have never been a lead foot" and I can get 40 to 43 miles on my car when the weather is from 50 to 85 degrees. In Colorado this is about 270 days and then we get about 50 days that are colder and the rest are hotter. Even when the temperature is over 85 I can get 35 miles per charge all the time but when the temperature drops below 50 I can only get 25 miles per charge. I know when the EPA rates gas cars they over state them by 20% so it seems strange that electrics get 10% off the top when they rate them. So far I am averaging 205 miles per gallon and it would have been over 250 but my charging area was being used for two months so I didn't get full charges every day. I am going to switch to the 220 charger so I can charge it more between drives during the day, this will reduce my gas usage to the point where I will only fill up every three to four months instead of the every two that I am doing now. The only small issue that I have come from living in Colorado, when it does get cold "35 or lower" the car will use the gas engine to heat the battery and for some reason this will really drop my gas range. When I used my Volt for a vacation I averaged 37 miles per gallon and about a quarter of that was in mountain mode so the engine runs more to keep a higher charge in the batteries. In the next Volt they need to use a smaller engine that has the generator / transmission lockup in one casting, this will save a lot of weight and reduce gas usage. I read that a 3 cylinder turbo unit was being tested and almost doubled the gas millage when it was run at a constant speed of 4800 rpm, just not sure why they need a turbo unless the extra torque is needed to turn the generator. So far I would give it a 9/10 stars and will buy another one when this one is given to my son.
      Spec
      • 2 Days Ago
      I hope this Caddy meets with great success.