Key to production of any kind is efficiency - the ability to achieve maximum productivity with minimal effort or waste. Toyota has become a master of efficiency, with streamlined manufacturing operations around the world. In fact, the Japanese brand has become so well known for efficient operations that it now offers consulting services for organizations and companies outside the auto industry.

It also offers the same consulting for non-profits, free of charge. The New York Times took an in-depth look at the transformative impact that Toyota's engineers had on the city's charities, including The Food Bank, the country's largest anti-hunger charity. The auto manufacturer helped revolutionize the way these organizations served the community, showing that there's more to corporate philanthropy than just donating money.

Head on over to the Times' website and give the story a read.


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  • 33 Comments
      bK
      • 2 Years Ago
      Great idea, kind of like the saying "if you give a man a fish...." These food banks and anti-hunger charities across the country have the worst productivity from my tiny volunteering experience.
      engr00
      • 2 Years Ago
      Their plants may be efficient but their engineer sure is not, they waste more time than Ive ever seen, and sit in one of their meeting where they discuss something simple for an hour. Unreal.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @engr00
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          • 2 Years Ago
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      answerinmachine3
      • 2 Years Ago
      It's great that toyota is donating their engineers, but did they have to donate all 3 of the female engineers that work there?
      Dave
      • 2 Years Ago
      How many hours of community service was she sentenced to serve?
      Nick Allain
      • 2 Years Ago
      This is a hilarious tax write-off. By sending engineers, they can write off a day's salary for some of their highest paid employees!
        knightrider_6
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Nick Allain
        Even if Toyota could get a tax deduction for this, it is still better than say Apple or Google evading taxes using offshore accounts.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Nick Allain
        [blocked]
      AP1_S2K
      • 2 Years Ago
      Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day; teach a man to fish and he'll eat forever.
        bonehead
        • 2 Years Ago
        @AP1_S2K
        Give a man a fire and he'll be warm for the night. Set a man on fire and he'll be warm for the rest of his life.
      Patrick
      • 2 Years Ago
      Well played Toyota....well played.
      • 2 Years Ago
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      David
      • 2 Years Ago
      The picture of the child in the background is scaring me.
      justgoawaymad
      • 2 Years Ago
      This cracks me up....everyone thinks Toyota is some kind of efficiency god. Do ANY of you have any idea where they got their principals from? anyone? bueler? Well it wasnt HAL, it was IBM
        icemilkcoffee
        • 2 Years Ago
        @justgoawaymad
        Actually they got it from Edward Deming. And Statistical Process Control itself came out of Bell Labs. Not sure where you got IBM from.
      RetrogradE
      • 2 Years Ago
      The button on her jacket is about to pop off and hit someone in the eye. Toyota might have and OSHA problem on their hands.
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