Motopeds motorized bicycle
  • Motopeds motorized bicycle
  • Motopeds motorized bicycle
  • Image Credit: Motopeds
  • Motopeds motorized bicycle
  • Motopeds motorized bicycle
  • Image Credit: Motopeds
  • Motopeds motorized bicycle
  • Motopeds motorized bicycle
  • Image Credit: Motopeds
Motorized bicycles have been around for a long time, but it isn't often that they're as cool as the off-road-oriented contraption called the Motoped. Looking more like a skinny dirtbike with pedals than a mountain bike or moped, Motopeds mount a 50-155cc Honda XR50/CRF50 engine and swingarm to a custom frame with downhill mountain bike suspension components and brakes.

Being able to ride quietly on the sidewalk, switch on the four-stroke Honda engine (or similar Chinese design, if you'd like to go the cheaper route), then pretend you're Ricky Carmichael for the rest of the way home sounds like great fun to us, but take note of your state's laws before you do so. In California, for example, the two main laws in the vehicle code require motorized bicycles to have automatic transmissions and less than two brake horsepower to be legal. Also take not that the Motoped is a build-it-yourself ordeal after buying the frame, though the company supplies a parts list with many options depending on price range. If you're interested, visit the company's Kickstarter for a discounted price on the frame (as long as the Kickstarter goal is met).

Whatever motor is featured in the video below is the one we want – we have a strong feeling it has more than two horsepower. Or wait for the electric motor version, which is under development, says Motopeds spokesman Joe Rajakaruna.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 43 Comments
      Lachmund
      • 1 Year Ago
      i think this is a pretty awesome idea. if i had the money to spend and wouldn't live in a city..
      bleexeo
      • 1 Year Ago
      Pretty misleading video since they are riding in California where 2hp and 30 mph max is the legal max. It's obvious they have more than 2hp and are going faster than 30 mph.
        Temple
        • 1 Year Ago
        @bleexeo
        Actually the Honda 50cc OHV engine makes exactly 2hp. Which I would suspect is what is being used peddling around. The off road ones I would think uses the 155cc engine.
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
      Ralph Waldo Emerson
      • 1 Year Ago
      As a mountain biker, road cyclist, and motorcycle rider, I find this both an interesting idea/execution, but at the same time see a very limited usefulness. I appreciate the ability to use it on the road or on the back trails, but as a commuter, I'm not sure I see much here. You can't use bike lanes (unless dragging it along with the pedals...107lbs. Ouch!), and otherwise you have no storage, no mirrors or brake lights, so it's illegal in most states to run as a "vehicle" on the street. I see this really only as a baby-motocross toy. It really is breaking the law in almost any other use. Not to say I wouldn't put one in my garage, I just don't see where to get much use out of it.
        Joseph Rajakaruna
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Ralph Waldo Emerson
        Your correct to be used in the bike lane you must pedal. But the design works so the motor and pedal can work together or one and the other. Its not a problem to turn the pedals and still get full engine assist.
      Rob J
      • 1 Year Ago
      As a "regular" mountain biker, there is so much I hate about this.
        Serge
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Rob J
        I would buy it... but not use it on MTB trails.
        savvybuyer
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Rob J
        Me too. It would absolutely ruin the hobby that I love to constantly have to worry about one of these coming up behind you on a single track, or worse, meeting one going the other way. Not to mention the damage to the trails and scaring off the wildlife that make it fun to be out in the woods. Part of the enjoyment of mountain biking is the whole human-powered machine thing. If you want to ride a motorcycle, get a freakin' motorcycle and stay off the bike trails. I will not be contributing to their kick-starter campaign.
          Dixon Ticonderoga
          • 1 Year Ago
          @savvybuyer
          @Rob J I could see using this in the same places I would use the Honda Grom. Fire roads or maybe light cross country MX rides. As a not mountain biker but occasional BMXer I can't see a situation where I would *want* to put this on a bike oriented trail. It seems like all sorts of fail for that, but it would seem more fun on smaller, MC oriented stuff. Basically the "slow car fast" fun of a 50, but with adult oriented ergos.
        travisjb
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Rob J
        could this be viable as a downhill rig? particularly in areas with no ski lift, all day long downhill
      Jr3
      • 1 Year Ago
      Lame. There's 30 seconds of actual dirt footage. Something like this would destroy normal MTB trails, a big no-no.
      BKdroid
      • 1 Year Ago
      Nice pitbike. This checks all the boxes for something that is absolutely awesome in theory, but outside the realm of reality for daily use. For commuting, most cities have regulations against ANY motorized vehicle over 50cc (or 2hp) riding in bike lanes/paths, which takes away the most fun configurations of this for offroad. And in regards to that offroad riding, this would still be 'legally' limited to trails that allow dirtbikes. Which are fewer and farther between every day. So, basically, it's not much use in either environment for which it is best suited. I love the concept, but the cyclist community will hate it (as already evidenced by comments here). It does seem like it would be pretty good fun on the trails.
        • 1 Year Ago
        @BKdroid
        [blocked]
          BKdroid
          • 1 Year Ago
          Considering the marketing video shows it being ridden on bike paths, it's not a huge jump to infer some daily use for commuting. And a few comments have been made about using it as a commuter. So, to answer your first question: Here. While in reality, regulations most likely prohibit that in a lot of places... including the very location of the video. And, like I said, it has limited use even as a toy.
      JC914
      • 1 Year Ago
      I would love to take this on my local mtb trail!
      iTsLiKeAnEgG
      • 1 Year Ago
      I think the concept is really cool but at just about $3,000.00 in parts plus the labor required to put it together (whether your own or someone elses) I don't find it very attractive. For $4,000.00 I can buy a pretty decent used motorcycle.
        • 1 Year Ago
        @iTsLiKeAnEgG
        [blocked]
        Joseph Rajakaruna
        • 1 Year Ago
        @iTsLiKeAnEgG
        The $3-4K is if you buy new parts separately. Sometimes it might be better to just get a completely built mountain bike or a used one and use it for parts. Likewise, if you shop around you can find great deals (maybe something like ebay). These factors could lower the total build cost to around $2-3K. Now, that's not a bad price. This is also a totally different experience than a motorcycle or mountain bike. The motorcycle part is an automatic transmission with the 49cc motor and you're not driving with main traffic. You're in the bike lane. The bike is only about 105lbs that makes it really easy to steer and handle. At about 100mpg it's also an economical way to commute.
          Rob J
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Joseph Rajakaruna
          "The motorcycle part is an automatic transmission with the 49cc motor and you're not driving with main traffic." Explain to me how a 49cc Honda Ruckus has to have a licensed rider, registration and ride in the street like a vehicle, but this doesn't? If more than 10 people in a city buy these, that city will ban them faster than a combination strip club/day care center. Trek (and others) will happily sell you an electric assist bike that doesn't weight 105 pounds, cost $4,000, endanger the people around you, annoy people with its exhaust noise, and finally, it is actually an ASSIST bike so you don't have dillweeds riding at 30mph in a bike lane.
        Bernard
        • 1 Year Ago
        @iTsLiKeAnEgG
        Well of course a used bike will cost less than a new one.
      Goahead
      • 1 Year Ago
      As long has an engine, you can never consider it a mountain bike category. With bikes you have to use muscles to move it. Looks like an ultralight dirt bike.
      sowman
      • 1 Year Ago
      This is what I want for the zombie apocalypse :) I seriously wish I had this when I was riding my bike to work everyday.
      AnOld BlackMarble
      • 1 Year Ago
      Looks like a mosquito.
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