• ETC
  • Jul 31st 2013 at 2:29PM
  • 26
Three-dimensional printing is being touted as the Next Big Thing, although at present the products have been on the smaller end. An ambitious man in New Zealand isn't letting that stop him, though. Engadget came up with the original story, and the subject is something we can totally get behind: a 1961 Aston Martin DB4.

Ivan Sentch, a programmer from Auckland, is printing the British GT. Using a Nissan Skyline GTS25T as a donor car, Sentch is going to print the Aston's body with a $499 solidoodle home 3D printer. He's kept a blog of the project since February, although he actually started printing in December of 2012. The posts offer intricate details on the process, including some of the unique problems being experienced. They make for a fascinating read, even if you aren't all that familiar with the subject matter.

As of his last post on July 26, Sentch has 72 percent of the body printed, while a prior post indicates that 52 percent of the car is assembled. Head on over to Sentch's blog for a full rundown of the progress on this intriguing project.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 26 Comments
      Matt
      • 2 Years Ago
      That FFF machine has a maximum part dimension of 8"x8"x8". I bet he spends a lot of time gluing 8" parts together!
        Poe
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Matt
        That explains the construction of the hood in the pic.
      SloopJohnB
      • 2 Years Ago
      We're. Gonna. Need. A. Bigger. Printer.
      turbomonkey2k
      • 2 Years Ago
      The article above actually gets it wrong. The body of the car isn't being 3D printed. Here's what's actually going on here: He's using the 3D printer to make a plug of the cars body which will then be used to create a mold which will in turn be used to cast the replica body of the car in fiberglass. The 3D printer is facilitating the process but it isn't actually printing the car.
      Street King
      • 2 Years Ago
      So you're saying that basically in a few years I'll be able to pirate a 70 AAR Cuda? Awesome.
        SloopJohnB
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Street King
        It's not pirate unless you do it for profit....generally fair use doctrine applies for your own use. If you want to scan a fender/part for a 70AAR Cuda knock yourself out.
      Julio B
      • 2 Years Ago
      Well, I will say it. I am very jealous of this guys skills. The closest I can get is ordering aftermarket parts for my 2012 Wrangler and installing them myself... At the end, he will be the only one driving a super sexy DB4 replica. For all the ones that care to read the blog, he already drives a Ferrari 250 GTO replica with a Nissan Skyline Turbo engine which he'll replace with a BMW V12 too. So, Tron explosion is extremely unlikely.
      HE
      • 2 Years Ago
      "You wouldn't download a car." We're getting there.
        SloopJohnB
        • 2 Years Ago
        @HE
        I'm holding out for 'Earl Grey tea, Wedgewood cup and saucer, temperature 202F."
      dimcorner
      • 2 Years Ago
      So if the car hits something, will it look like Tron and have little square bits flying all over?
        speedracerx808
        • 2 Years Ago
        @dimcorner
        Article is severely lacking. He is going to create a mold out of the 3d printed body to create a fiberglass shell. So Tron explosion unfortunately.
      rebman70
      • 2 Years Ago
      Could someone 3D print me a Salma Hayek or Marissa Miller for,.....uh...research?
      kuntknife
      • 2 Years Ago
      And now, because of this article, he's going to get a cease and desist.
      flammablewater
      • 2 Years Ago
      I believe there are designs for a 3d printable upgrade for the Makerbot that adds a conveyor belt system allowing for essentially an infinite length to one side. Could be a very useful addition here.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        RodRAEG
        • 2 Years Ago
        You can either scan or create something in CAD. As long as you can convert it into an stl file, you're good. Typical materials are either thermoset or thermosplastic for polymers, or various metal alloys of steel, aluminum, and titanium. For the solidoodle that the guy's using, material is fed from a spool and sent through a heated extruder. It's very much like printing with an automated glue gun, building the part up layer by layer. The main methods currently used is powder-based laser sintering, and liquid-based UV hardening. Some other ones exist as well, such as layer-by-layer fusion via ultrasonic welding, laser deposition, and some others.
        SloopJohnB
        • 2 Years Ago
        google 3D printing. More than you ever wanted to know.
      SloopJohnB
      • 2 Years Ago
      Interesting...suppose he printed it in aluminum or even titanium.
        RetrogradE
        • 2 Years Ago
        @SloopJohnB
        Interesting. . .suppose your wife liked real meat or tofu.
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