• Jul 29, 2013
Egg cookery is slow cookery, or so says my Mom. Apparently it shares this trait with in-wheel electric motor cookery. We first told you about a certain in-wheel motor under development back in 2010 which, at the time, had been already been in the frying pan for three years. Fast forward to now and voilà! It's done. At least, close enough to be put on display for the first time in public.

Evans Electric has chosen Meguiar's MotorEx – Australia's largest automotive enthusiast event – as the venue in which to lift the lid on what it's been up to all these years: a 75-kW (100.6 horsepower) axial flux 3-phase AC induction wheel motor boasting 625 Nm (460.9 pound-feet) of torque. And that's just the nominal output. They peak at double that rating.

If one were to stick a couple pair on, say, a Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution III as Evans has (pictured), then one could experience acceleration the likes of which would wreak havoc with one's physiology. That is to say, put your heart in your mouth, if not intimately acquaint your belly button with your back bone.

But this recipe is not just about raw power. It's also about increasing efficiency and a certain amount of added refinement in handling. No gearbox means less friction whilst gaining speed and more energy making its way back into the battery under regenerative braking. Highly controllable wheels means that torque vectoring, active brake bias, stability and traction control (among other things), are all manageable through software.

Though the company has developed power electronics, done lots of validation testing and had talks about moving from the proof-of-concept to the commercial-product-development stage, the pudding has yet to be tasted. We are hopeful though. The spoons are said to come out in a few short months when the monster-motor shod EVO takes to the track. For more details, scroll below for the official press release.
Show full PR text
Evans Electric Unveils AWD In-Wheel Motor powered electric car

SYDNEY – Australia based start-up company Evans Electric have unveiled an All Wheel Drive In-
Wheel Motor powered Lancer Evo 3 during Meguiar's MotorEx at Sydney Olympic Park

The 4 door sedan with World Rally Championship pedigree features a direct drive, disc type electric motor in each of it's 19" wheels. Each Axial Flux 3 phase AC Induction wheel motor has a nominal output of 75 kw and 625 Nm of torque with a peak output of 150 kw and 1,250 Nm giving the vehicle a total peak output of 600 kw (800 hp) and 5,000 Nm.*

Direct drive wheel motors eliminate mechanical transmission losses allowing up to 85% of a
vehicle's kinetic energy to be recoverable during braking. Maximising brake regeneration lowers a vehicles over-all energy consumption potentially leading to more range per kWh of battery capacity or the use of a smaller battery pack for similar range. As the battery is the single most expensive component in an EV this could lead to lower cost electric cars.

The Evans Electric in-wheel motors enable non-contact electromagnetic braking, replacing
hydraulic friction brake systems which are 99% redundant in current generation electric/hybrid
vehicles. Using only the wheel motors, the car can brake at greater than 1G.

Evans Electric hold a patent for a vehicle drive system using wheel motors for propulsion and
braking, the most impressive feature of which is that safety and vehicle dynamics features such as ABS, stability control, traction control, brake steer, active brake bias, torque vectoring, intelligent cruise control, emergency brake assist and collision avoidance all become customisable and upgradable software functions.

When these systems are combined with wheel motors they allow a new level of performance based
active yaw control that unlike most current stability control systems (which only activate in an emergency situation) are active at all times, dynamically fine tuning understeer and oversteer to enhance cornering speed and safety.

After an extensive period of wheel motor validation testing and power electronics development the company has met with several automotive Tier 1 suppliers to discuss collaboration &/or licensing to move the project from proof of concept to commercial product development. Final preparations are under way with track testing expected to commence by the time the Bathurst 1000 rolls around in October.

*While the torque figure could at first glance appear fantastic, standard automotive industry practice only quotes torque at the flywheel not at the wheels. As an example the Tesla Model S Performance has a quoted peak motor torque of 600 Nm. With a single speed reduction gear ratio of 9.73:1 that equates to a total of 5,838 Nm (minus gearing losses) at the wheels. The Evans Electric motors are direct drive, so the rotor turns at the same speed as the wheel. Instead of mechanical reduction gearing, they are electrically geared using an 8 pole stator winding configuration.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 22 Comments
      paulwesterberg
      • 1 Year Ago
      [–]paulwesterberg 1 point 48 milliseconds ago Direct drive has the most potential to revolutionize vehicles as we know them. No need for a huge engine compartment. Place the batteries in the car for best weight distribution and design the vehicle body for best aerodynamics and handling. Anti-Lock brakes, traction control, torque vectoring, regenerative braking are all easy to do and more responsive than mechanically linked systems.
        skierpage
        • 1 Year Ago
        @paulwesterberg
        You get all those benefits with in-board motors connected to the wheels, without the unsprung weight and durability problems of in-wheel motors. The Tesla Model S chassis does almost everything you say but has their compact high-power motor+controller+reduction gear powering both rear wheels. It's not as flexible as torque vectoring for each wheel, but traction control and per-wheel braking gets you close.
          otiswild
          • 1 Year Ago
          @skierpage
          If the motors are compact enough to fit within a wheel, then they're compact enough to fit 2 of them inboard back to back and still have some space saved..
      2 wheeled menace
      • 1 Year Ago
      I wish them the best of luck, but.. I think that just as with friction driven bicycles, they will find that this path is a dead end.
      Marco Polo
      • 1 Year Ago
      I hate to say anything derogatory about any start up company developing EV technology, however at first glance Evans Electric would appear to be more about attracting gullible investors than any genuine product. A quick search of the Australian Stock Exchange records reveals no listed public company as Evens Electric Limited. In Australia only public companies can use the term "Limited" , thereby ensuring that they have issued investors with an approved prospectus. Private companies are required to attach the suffix Pty Ltd, indicating that they are forbidden to offer a proscribed interest to the public. So, with this rather ominous misrepresentation, Evens Electric's claims need more than usual scrutiny. Over the last 6 years this enterprise has held a lot of press conferences, 'almost ready' technology launches and keeps on recruiting investment, with endless promises of 'just around the corner' breakthrough developments. Sometimes it's difficult to decipher whether these enterprises are outright scams, delusional, or a combination of both. Usually, once exposed, I either get a flood of indignant responses, from those associated with the enterprise (always without any verifiable technical information) followed by the disappearance of the enterprise. I have no idea as to the sincerity of the individuals behind Evans Electric, but after viewing the website the term 'vapourware' springs to mind. I would be gratified to be proven wrong and invite Evans Electric , and Domenick Yoney, to seize this opportunity to establish Evans Electric's bon-a-fides, in an open and transparent manner.
        EV News
        • 10 Months Ago
        @Marco Polo
        What an AMAZINGLY ignorant comment! The company's ACN (122508016) is clearly listed on their web-site. If you learnt how to 'spell' correctly you might be more credible! Piss pour effort for a former Sydney teacher!
          • 5 Months Ago
          @EV News
          Read the comment again. The company is not listed as a public company as suggested on the website. Oh, and it's piss poor*.
        DarylMc
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Marco Polo
        Since it is being developed in Australia I would like it to be otherwise but I fear everything you just said is probably true. To me there are a couple of interesting aspects of their wheel motor and the way they are approaching it. One is doing way with brakes by having very powerful motors (a rather elegant solution). The other is the use of an induction motor rather than permanent magnets in a wheel motor. Both of these things would be very appealing for a wheel motor but in the absence of any specifications for weight and efficiency I would give them little credibility.
      Captain Stu
      • 1 Year Ago
      Genius! Cool that they put it on an Evo. Performance on-demand is a good idea. (Unsprung weight, not so much though)
        paulwesterberg
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Captain Stu
        > Using only the wheel motors, the car can brake at greater than 1G. So they can ditch the heavy steel disc rotors which helps to keep wheel weight reasonable.
      Joeviocoe
      • 1 Year Ago
      Very nice. But I am not sure that the Rally Car Racing chops of the EVO is improved overall if you add so much unsprung weight. It seems like the advantages of torque and true independent all-wheel drive... gets negated if wheels are so heavy.
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Joeviocoe
        But since this isn't a race car...
        Domenick
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Joeviocoe
        We don't know the weight of the motors yet, so it's hard to say exactly to what degree unsprung weight might be increased. The original prototypes certainly seemed rather light. (http://youtu.be/rnJz0RtdTiE) The effect of any increased weight can also be somewhat ameliorated by using lighter components, such as rims, control arms, etc. In speaking with the Catavolt Racing team, who use a dual-hub motor from EnerTrac, it seemed that suspension tweaking pretty much overcame any unsprung weight issues in that application. Regardless, I look forward to seeing results of physical road testing.
        Joeviocoe
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Joeviocoe
        I look forward to the tests too. Thanks.
      lad
      • 1 Year Ago
      The real problem with hub motors is not unsprung weight or even contamination. The problem is bearing wear because the motor bearings, which now also become the wheel bearings, must carry the weight of the car and the suspension punishment while maintaining the absolutely critical gap, measured in thousands of an inch, between the motor rotor and stator. If the gap opens, the torque of the motor is reduced and if the gap is opened enough, the rotor crashes against the stator... Bing, Bang Pow!
        • 1 Year Ago
        @lad
        As DarylMc said since it's axial flux the bearing wear wouldn't effect the air gap. Though the stator/rotor discs would get slightly misaligned. Whatever that means. I doubt it results in anything remotely significant performance wise at the expected sub-mm magnitude.
        Nicholas (Kompulsa)
        • 1 Year Ago
        @lad
        Why not equip it with conventional wheel bearings then? (separate from the motor's bearings) Or did they already?
        2 wheeled menace
        • 1 Year Ago
        @lad
        I made an error in my post in the first paragraph. i meant to say 'never so narrow'
        2 wheeled menace
        • 1 Year Ago
        @lad
        Hm, i have disassembled many hub motors and the gap between the stator and the magnets is never so large that even the most absolutely trashed set of bearings i've seen has ever hurt the stator/magnets. You can make bearings strong enough to last the life of the vehicle. The front end of my 1996 Nissan has 244k on it's original wheel bearings. I have also seen people in the ebike community run hub motors for 5+ years and never experience the failure mode you describe. They typically die due to water ingress.
      Stacy
      • 1 Year Ago
      Love to see this post. http://www.travelcountries.org/
      DarylMc
      • 1 Year Ago
      Hi 2WM Unlike the bike hub motors, these are axial motors with the air gap at 90 degrees to the axle. I don't think it is insurmountable but I'm sure you can see that a small amount of play is more likely to cause problems in this design. I was once fortunate enough to view a disassembled CSIRO solar racer wheel motor if you have ever heard of them. It did indeed have some scratching on the epoxy encapsulated stator from contact with the magnets.
      • 1 Year Ago
      Me thinks you were hungry when you wrote this one.
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