• ETC
  • Jul 28th 2013 at 9:01AM
  • 56
Mike Kluzner is a man of many talents. Not only is he the software engineer responsible for fuel system diagnostics for Ford globally, he "got his start designing laser weapon systems capable of disabling the navigation systems of enemy satellites" for the former Soviet Union. Quite a résumé, wouldn't you say?

You may be asking yourself the same question that popped into our minds upon reading about Mr. Kluzner: What do laser weapon systems have to do with Ford and its EcoBoost engines? We'll let the man answer himself. "The same process for analyzing key physical relationships works for what we do today in engine combustion, catalyst chemistry and mechanics," says Kluzner. "These are all part of Ford's software engineering expertise." Who are we to argue?

Ford also employs an engineer who previously designed software to detect damage to the heat tiles on the International Space Station, as well as one who's past work involved particle physics, says the automaker in the press release below. David Bell (pictured above right), global boost system controls engineer for Ford, describes the software running EcoBoost as "the secret sauce" that makes the technology work as the driver intends and demands.

Scroll down below to find out more, and to learn how Ford's 125 (and growing, it says) patents related to EcoBoost help keep the automaker at the forefront of engine technology.
Show full PR text
Software Emerges as 'Secret Sauce' to Ford EcoBoost Success

• Powertrain control software linchpin to Ford EcoBoost® market success
• Software engineers' eclectic experience includes particle physics, Space Shuttle safety and laser-guided defense systems
• Ford EcoBoost volumes, vehicle applications growing worldwide



DEARBORN, Mich., July 26, 2013 – Mike Kluzner's experience is considered only somewhat unusual among the ranks of Ford's in-house software engineers. Kluzner got his start designing laser weapon systems capable of disabling the navigation systems of enemy satellites.

His employer? The former Soviet Union.

Today, Kluzner designs software for onboard fuel system diagnostics on Ford vehicles sold worldwide. Kluzner holds more than 20 patents on onboard diagnostics.

"During my work for the military, I was trained very early on how to establish and maintain consistent product performance," said Kluzner, who was born Mikhail Igor Kluzner and has lived in the United States since 1990. "This became part of my engineering DNA.

"The same process for analyzing key physical relationships works for what we do today in engine combustion, catalyst chemistry and mechanics," he added. "These are all part of Ford's software engineering expertise."

Kluzner, who began his career with the company in 1996, is one of dozens of in-house powertrain control software engineers at Ford. A large part of these engineers' jobs is to continually improve and reinvent the control strategies on Ford's award-winning EcoBoost® engines.

Other engineers in the group have backgrounds that include designing software to detect damage to heat tiles on the international Space Shuttle, as well as work in particle physics.

The importance of these software engineers to the global expansion of the EcoBoost franchise is hard to overestimate. The software they are working on must manage and optimize increasingly sophisticated hardware in the EcoBoost engines to make Ford vehicles more powerful, cleaner and fuel efficient.

"No doubt, turbocharging, direct injection and cam timing hardware are key ingredients of Ford's EcoBoost recipe, but the secret sauce is the software," said David Bell, Ford global boost system controls engineer. "The hardware existed, but without our unique software and engine tuning, EcoBoost wouldn't have been as successful with consumers."

Secret sauce for EcoBoost
Ford's EcoBoost engines faced several challenges when the technology first launched in 2009. One was overcoming consumers' resistance to radically smaller engines with fewer cylinders. Another was the technical difficulty of making powerful engines while still meeting tightening emissions regulations.

Ford's team of in-house software control engineers patented software tricks that exploit hardware advances – like the turbochargers and direct fuel injection systems – like no other car company in the world. In fact, Ford has earned or has patents pending for several of its software control technologies.

The result is a new generation of smaller, more power-dense engines that deliver the fuel economy of smaller engines while minimizing or eliminating the traditional shortcomings of turbocharged engines, including turbo lag (the delay between a driver stepping on the accelerator and the engine responding with the desired power).

"Our control software has helped us deliver a combination of power, torque, driveability and efficiency like no other automaker in the world," said Bell. "Sometimes, the software helps anticipate demands for power before the driver even fully depresses the accelerator."

For example, in conditions such as an anticipated transmission shift, the software tells the engine to close the throttle slightly and leave the turbo wastegate closed to maintain boost pressure ahead of an upshift. The customer never sacrifices performance.

Demand booming
Without the software engineers' work, EcoBoost could not have succeeded in the marketplace. But by offering increased fuel economy with no zap to performance, EcoBoost has been an unqualified success. Customers are snapping up EcoBoost-equipped vehicles as fast as Ford can make them. Sales of vehicles with EcoBoost are approaching 70,000 units per month worldwide.

EcoBoost-equipped vehicles are gaining share in the U.S. market. The take rate for EcoBoost on F-150 trucks is 42 percent, on Escape it is 89 percent and on Fusion, 52 percent.

A fifth EcoBoost variant, a 1.5-liter engine, was recently introduced to meet growing demand for powerful, more efficient vehicles globally. The award-winning 1.0-liter EcoBoost, already available in Europe, will be available this fall on the 2014 Ford Fiesta.

# # #

About Ford Motor Company
Ford Motor Company, a global automotive industry leader based in Dearborn, Mich., manufactures or distributes automobiles across six continents. With about 177,000 employees and 65 plants worldwide, the company's automotive brands include Ford and Lincoln. The company provides financial services through Ford Motor Credit Company. For more information regarding Ford and its products worldwide, please visit http://corporate.ford.com.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 56 Comments
      Luke
      • 2 Years Ago
      Now if only I could get an EcoBoost with frickin' laser beams attached to the hood....
      EZEE
      • 2 Years Ago
      Great headline there Jeremy... So ford hired a soviet laser weapons expert.... I just....sigh....
      ChaosphereIX
      • 2 Years Ago
      call it turbo, ecoboost is a stupid name
        Jarda
        • 2 Years Ago
        @ChaosphereIX
        why fixing something that works and sells as hotcakes?
        Javanese
        • 2 Years Ago
        @ChaosphereIX
        my thoughts exactly. It's basically a marketing speak for turbocharged direct injection engine.
          Snark
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Javanese
          So what? Get over it.
        gtv4rudy
        • 2 Years Ago
        @ChaosphereIX
        Call it 'turbo'... thats brilliant, how did you come up with that idea?
          fast156GTA
          • 2 Years Ago
          @gtv4rudy
          Multiair (or Uniair) is an electro-hydraulic variable valve actuation technology controlling air intake (without a throttle valve) in petrol engines. It is compatible with both naturally aspirated and forced-induction engines. Multiair technology was patented by Fiat in 2002. it was launched at the 2009 Geneva Motor Show to be available in the Alfa Romeo MiTo. The new engine is produced in Termoli, Italy at the Fiat Powertrain Technologies factory. The 1.4 L Multiair engine won the "Best New Engine of 2010" award. For the Fiat 500 North American version the 1.4 L engine is produced also at the Global Engine Manufacturing Alliance in Dundee, Michigan, United States. The MultiAir valvetrain components for the North American market Fiat FIRE and Chrysler Tigershark engines are manufactured and assembled by Schaeffler Group in Cheraw, South Carolina. The Fiat TwinAir 875 cc two-cylinder engine is also using Multiair technology, it was named as Best New Engine of 2011. Technology : The basic idea, controlling intake valves, works upon the following principle: a valve tappet (cam follower), moved by a mechanical intake cam, is connected to the intake valve through a hydraulic chamber, controlled by a normally open on/off solenoid valve. The system allows optimum intake valve opening schedules. MultiAir engines will increase power (up to 10%) and torque (up to 15%), as well as considerably reduce consumption levels (up to 10%) and emissions of CO2 (up to 10%), particulates (up to 40%) and NOx (up to 60%) when compared to a traditional petrol engine. The system also provides smoother cold weather operation, more even torque delivery and no engine shake at shut-off. The Ford EcoBoost has (Twin) independent Variable Camshaft Timing, which is cheaper and by far less sophisticated. The engine block for the 3 cylinder engine is cast iron instead of aluminium for up to 50% faster warm-up, at the expense of additional weight. Dry weight Ford EcoBoost V6: 449 lbs (203 kg), I4 2.0: 328 lbs(149 kg), I4 1.6: 251 lbs (114 kg). All aluminium heads and engine blocks. I3 1.0: 213 lbs (97 kg) aluminium head and cast iron block. MultiAir is the future for valve and air control. Ford EcoBoost is cheaper technology for cheaper cars with less results. Hope you can discuss MultiAir and EcoBoost technology further now knowing what you are talking about.
          Jarda
          • 2 Years Ago
          @gtv4rudy
          @ChaosphereIX: Have you ever heard of Fiat? It's the company that owns Chrysler. Now how about TwinAir?
          Cesare
          • 2 Years Ago
          @gtv4rudy
          Because the TwinAir is a two cylinder (twin) that utilizes air (like any ICE). How basic does that get? Pretty explanatory of the equipment in discussion.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        Luke
        • 2 Years Ago
        You're talking about the best-selling brand for the last two years, and currently number one this year?
        Jarda
        • 2 Years Ago
        juanb60 got fired from FoMoCo for smoking weed during his workshift
          NissanGTR
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Jarda
          More like coke. A more profiting drug in his native country.
        • 2 Years Ago
        [blocked]
      charles
      • 2 Years Ago
      The EcoBoast doesn't have the sterling reputation Ford thinks it does.
        Indubitably
        • 2 Years Ago
        @charles
        Really? http://www.autoblog.com/2013/06/05/ford-wins-second-consecutive-engine-of-the-year-with-1-0l-ecoboo/
      John Lucas
      • 2 Years Ago
      Ecoboost is nothing more than an engine with Direct Injection/Turbo. Ford would like you to believe they have some technologically advance engine that no one esle has, but the fact remains, Ford was real late in the game with that tech..... behind VW and GM. Turbos are not really desirable for truck engines, except unless it's diesel. That's why GM never use this tech in trucks. GM now has a V8 that get's better gas mileage then the V6 Ecoboost. http://www.dailytech.com/GM+Tired+of+Fords+EcoBoost+V6+Bragging+Touts+More+Efficient+V8+for+Silverado/article30253.htm
        John
        • 2 Years Ago
        @John Lucas
        How the heck is a turbo not desirable for a truck engine? The 3.5 EB makes more torque lower down the the 6.2L v8 & gets better mileage doing it. Trucks are all about torque when it comes to moving a heavy load around. The 3.5 EB's torque starts to hit near peak numbers at 1500-2k rpm and holds it on into the 4500-5k range where the 6.2L v8 starts making those numbers at 4500rpm and falls of quickly by 5500rpm. So while the 6.2L v8 shows more power and torque is peaky and is hardly ideal for towing & hauling when compared to the 3.5 EB. http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v293/jonbar87/Ecoboostvs62vs50-HP-Torque.png Also, when comparing mileage. Keep in mind the GM engine is a fresh redesign using the latest & greatest while the 3.5EB made its show debut in 2007 with its production debut coming in 2009 in 2010 model vehicles. If you look at the leaps and bounds made in the last couple years this is quite a major difference. The real reason GM is just starting to get into the turbo game is that they don't like to be major risk takers. Trust me, I used to be a GM tech, you get used to seeing things done the same way for a lot of different vehicles for a very long time. Don't expect the EcoBoost team to rest on their laurels. There will be even more tech and advancements packed into the next gen F150 in regards to the Ecoboost. Oh, & keep in mind, while your "v8" was getting that mileage its really running as a 2.65L 4cyl.
        Jason
        • 2 Years Ago
        @John Lucas
        Yes, you are right. and BMW "Twin Power" is nothing more than turbo + variable cam timing. What's your point? Ford hit on a chord that buyers liked and they are selling and making more money on cars when they do. BMW get higher margins because their buyers like that the idea too. Good for them. Isn't America a great place?
        • 2 Years Ago
        @John Lucas
        [blocked]
      Farmerboy
      • 2 Years Ago
      If the titled story had said GM, the Ford loving right wing would had accused GM of hiring terrorist.
        Jarda
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Farmerboy
        if there is room for stupid comment Farmerboy won't let such opportunity escape
      leo
      • 2 Years Ago
      hahahha, uhhh isn't the F150 Ecobooost having all sorts of engine issues.. guess 'the secret sauce' is not working that well....
      VL00
      • 2 Years Ago
      Ecoboost = turbocharged engine. Something that people have been building for decades. There is nothing special about "Ecoboost" engines.
        merlot066
        • 2 Years Ago
        @VL00
        EcoBoost is the term given to Ford's advanced gasoline combustion engines. They all incorporate DOHC, Turbocharging, Direct Injection, TiVCT, and will all incorporate future technologies like cooled EGR, laser ignition, etc. EcoBoost is a marketing term with immense brand equity. People don't really go running around Chevy dealers demanding something with an Ecotec motor in it.
          merlot066
          • 2 Years Ago
          @merlot066
          Cooled EGR is required on Diesel engines, it isn't on gas engines as far as I know, though some engines might use it. I wasn't specifically saying those are the only two things that Ford will ever incorporate into their engines, but the point still remains that EcoBoost is synonymous with the latest technology Ford has to offer, much like InTech was for Lincoln in the 90s. An EcoBoost badge actually indicates something, what is more puzzling to me is Mazda's extensive use of the term "SkyActive"
          Rotation
          • 2 Years Ago
          @merlot066
          Cooled EGR isn't a future technology, cars have had it for a decade. As far as I know, every EcoBoost already has it. Laser ignition probably won't ever happen. If it does, it'll likely be well after EcoBoost is a faded memory.
        Rotation
        • 2 Years Ago
        @VL00
        It's turbocharging and direct injection on a gas engine. Still something that had been built for a decade. Mazda, VW and GM beat them to it.
      RonMcCord
      • 2 Years Ago
      Ford is leading American car manufactures out of the depression low quality years. Ford Escape, Fusion, Fiesta, and especially Focus and of course F150 are all top 3 type of sellers, not sure when the last time an American Manfucturer could state that. I for one love the Focus for my needs. Look forward to the new Mustang. Hopefully it does not look too retro and more modern, if it looks more similar to an Aston Martin the then a Hill Billy tacky car it will be a big win for Ford
      AcidTonic
      • 2 Years Ago
      Except nothing is innovative about how Ford tunes their cars.... They pull the MAF, run speed density. Big deal. Bet none of you knew that the Lancer Evolution in 2008 came out with a Hybrid-setup that runs both Mass Air AND Speed Density on the same ECU while crossing over between the two setups. Mass air is more accurate under steady conditions than Speed Density. Speed density is better for transient conditions where the air is oscillating which throws off the MAF readings. Never saw another car that runs both...... Car checks both MAF and MAP then decides which one is more correct. In one WOT run it may start with MAF at idle, MAP for spool, MAF for peak power, then MAP from there to redline. That's innovative stuff but everyone knows that we all hate Mitsubishi so we should ignore them and talk about Fords age old Speed Density setup on their EcoBoosts.....
        • 2 Years Ago
        @AcidTonic
        [blocked]
        • 2 Years Ago
        @AcidTonic
        [blocked]
        Jarda
        • 2 Years Ago
        @AcidTonic
        now back to car-makers that matter in 2013
      That Guy
      • 2 Years Ago
      Aside from being successful as a marketing campaign and deceiving customers, how exactly can you call Egoboost a success when there have been numerous engines before it with turbos and direct injection?
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