Larry Kosilla, the founder of the Ammo NYC line of car cleaning products, has his own show YouTube's Drive network – we saw his work before when he gave a Ferrari 288 GTO a two-day detailing job. On this episode, Kosilla gets called in to do his best with a 1966 Porsche 912, a car that was last registered in 1990 and recently found in a barn in Connecticut.

Among the expected dirt and cobwebs, the Irish Green Porsche is also covered what is assumed to be cat fur and "waste." The car is in such delicate condition, however, that Kosilla can't wash it for fear of getting more water in it than on it, so he has to steam and wipe the entire thing down before he begins the paint correction process. In addition to the thorough knowledge of his work and his ability to explain it simply, the episode is captioned with further information one of Porsche's popular but less regarded models, and how Kosilla does what he does.

You'll find a compelling 29 minute masterclass in the video below.



I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 23 Comments
      Scr
      • 1 Year Ago
      Its always great to watch somebody who is pretty much the best at what they do work on something.
      Cayman
      • 1 Year Ago
      What is so weird about a '66 model being built in late '65??? It's kind of standard and is still don't by pretty much all manufacturers today.
      chest rockwell
      • 1 Year Ago
      Very well put together and imformative video. I can\'t even begin to imagine what that must have cost to clean though!!
      Scooter
      • 1 Year Ago
      Not to be snarky or anything, but that Porsche was in amazing condition already. The leather wasn't even damaged. My grandpa kept a gorgeous classic VW Beetle on his property (outside) for so many years plants started growing inside the car. Its a real shame because the outershell is gorgeous. Restore that!
        BG
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Scooter
        I agree. That car was in amazing shape for a "barn find." Fortunately the original owner had the foresight to store it under cover.
      xersn
      • 1 Year Ago
      I never really appreciated these types of car cleaning guys... the type that doesn't put the car up on stands, take the wheels off, clean the inside of the wheels & tires, suspension, wheelhouses, etc.. Then clean the door jambs, hood / bonnet / decklid jambs, hinges, etc.. then the engine bay. There's so much residual dirt and grime that can be removed prior rather than just doing the outside surfaces.
        • 1 Year Ago
        @xersn
        [blocked]
        angelalvalois
        • 1 Year Ago
        @xersn
        Did you even watch the video? The purpose wasn't to do a concours quality detail, it was to clean the car up enough to see what was there and what the next step would be. People like you who feel you must post even though you haven't even reviewed the subject material are the bane of the internet.
          xersn
          • 1 Year Ago
          @angelalvalois
          you misread my comment... I just think it's better to clean all the jambs, or where any dirt, especially abrasive dirt is trapped or hidden, why I used the word "prior".... just blowing steam into the gaps with the hood, doors being closed etc.. doesn't clean out them well enough. By the time the exterior is clean and he hits it with a polisher that vibrates the panels, that trapped dirt can come out and get onto the pad. It's not a big deal to clean the dirt off the inside of the wheelwells, jambs, inside of the wheels, etc.. wasn't talking about a lack of effort or restoration, was just commenting on what should be cleaned first. I do like the idea of steam cleaning with pressure to get any dirt out trapped under the trim our around emblems.
        Matt
        • 1 Year Ago
        @xersn
        His services range from a wash and wax or a paint correction all the way to a concours quality finish where he spends 200+ hours on the car. He has a lot of videos and some are where he just sets up the camera and you watch him work. There are times where he will put it n stands and clean every nook and cranny.
      csrecord
      • 1 Year Ago
      That car wasn't that bad to begin with.
        Larry Kosilla
        • 1 Year Ago
        @csrecord
        hmmm....hard to say without seeing it in person. It was pretty bad. Thanks for watching!
          tegdesign
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Larry Kosilla
          Hi Larry. Love your videos! What kind of ozone machine do you like. Are there any dangers in using an ozone machine to cars, people or pets?
        Scooter
        • 1 Year Ago
        @csrecord
        Your right on, anybody with NuFinish and buffing pad could replicate the same results.
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
      Luis A. Martinez
      • 1 Year Ago
      Amazing car,amazing video,this guy is my hero......wish to find a Citroen DS and do the same,just give away my Datsun 240z proyect (need room for the Wrangler) and got some interior pieces,Crome trim and more there taking space,soon I may trow it away (not many body shop for old cars here in Florida,everybody got scare with the Datsun tin metal and was 14 years on a field too,sad but is gone now.
      RetrogradE
      • 1 Year Ago
      "resurrect the finish" is oddly worded. But that 912 is not oddly designed--it's badass.
      SFGiantsFan35
      • 1 Year Ago
      Unless I'm mistaken, that's the same garage Wayne Carini (Chasing Classic Cars/http://www.f40.com) pulled a Bugatti out of a couple of years ago... freaking awesome garage!
      BG
      • 1 Year Ago
      Interesting, indeed. I probably would have used water for the first pass around the hood and trunk (maybe not roof) even at the risk of water getting inside because water lifts and carries away dirt and slime. And good old car shampoo is an amazing product to cut through organic dirt. But I understand his reasoning. As an aside: ever notice how many cars on the road today have dark front wheels because of caked-on brake dust? The owners did not have the energy to wash off the wheels even every 6 months or so? Odd.
        Patrick
        • 1 Year Ago
        @BG
        The most amusing move is when the brake dust covered wheels get rotated and not washed =)
    • Load More Comments