When meeting a duo of computer hackers for the very first time, we imagine hearing the words "We want to convince you that we can hurt you – without hurting you," is bound to release the hounds of anxiety upon your mental makeup. At least, it would ours. And it's those words, uttered by Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek to Forbes staff reporter Andy Greenberg, that introduce us to the reality that modern-day cars can indeed be hacked.

The next frightening step down the rabbit hole, which is outlined in the video below, involves entering into a Toyota Prius that looks like a science project gone wrong – missing dash, wires hanging down and a laptop computer hiding in the back seat. It's kind of like being a human marionette puppet with the strings held high above by Dr. Frankenstein's tech-geeky grandson. In other words, "Are you guys both buckled up?" is no longer a friendly safety-minded reminder, it's a scared-for-my-life requirement.

See how these two hackers earned a bunch of money from the US government trying to hack into a couple of cars in the video below. And keep your tinfoil hats close by.

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