It was only a matter of time before law enforcement agencies would realize the potential of driver-assist technology for use in their Ford Police Interceptors, and, now that they have, those back-up cameras and radar systems won't be used just for parking, but for security, as well.

The surveillance mode system works when the camera or radar detects movement from behind the vehicle, and if it does when it's activated, an alarm will alert the officer inside the car, the driver's side window will roll up and the doors will lock, protecting the officer from an unwanted intrusion. The officer, of course, has the option to turn surveillance mode off, mainly in urban areas where pedestrians would constantly set the alarm off, and it can only be activated when the police car is in park.

Randy Freiburger, Ford's police and ambulance fleet supervisor, came up with the patent-pending idea when researching the needs of police officers and riding along with them, during which time he realized officers would be safer with an extra set of eyes watching the area behind their cars, especially at night or when they're completing paperwork, using the in-car computer or handling a radar gun. "Unfortunately, there are people with bad intentions who sneak up on police officers," he says.

Ford and Intermotive Inc. are developing the surveillance mode system together, and it can be installed at Crown, the facility near Ford's plant in Chicago where police car accessories are installed, or it can be upfitted locally by working directly with Intermotive. We're glad police officers have an extra layer of protection courtesy of everyday automobile technologies - it's a rough world out there! Scroll down to glean more details in the press release.
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New Technology for Ford Police Interceptor Uses Radar, Backup Camera to Alert, Protect Law Enforcement Officers

- Surveillance mode technology for Ford Police Interceptor introduced to warn and help protect law enforcement officers from unexpected approaches to their vehicle from the rear

- Using existing driver-assist technologies to detect a person approaching Ford Police Interceptor from behind, the system automatically sounds a chime, rolls up the driver's side window and locks all doors


DEARBORN, Mich., July 19, 2013 – A new technology available for Ford Police Interceptor will provide an additional measure of security for law enforcement officers by mitigating their risk of being snuck up on from the rear while working in their vehicles, especially at night.

The new surveillance mode technology works by using existing Ford driver-assist technologies – a backup camera, cross-traffic alert and reverse park assist – to give police officers added situational awareness and a first line of defense from potential assailants.

When an officer activates the system with the vehicle in park, the backup camera, combined with sensors that detect blind spots and parking obstacles, continually monitors the area to the rear of the vehicle. Surveillance mode can be turned off in situations such as curbside urban settings where pedestrians would constantly set the alarm off.

The patent-pending idea is the brainchild of Randy Freiburger, Ford police and ambulance fleet supervisor. Freiburger spent many hours riding along with police officers and saw firsthand the dangers officers face in the course of routine patrols and investigations.

"I can tell you from personal experience at night that officer security is a critical concern," says Freiburger. "Unfortunately, there are people with bad intentions who sneak up on police officers. This system builds upon the Ford Police Interceptor DNA that puts safety and security at the top of the list."

Officers have to write reports, monitor an in-car computer or radar gun, and perform other tasks while sitting in their vehicle. Surveillance mode gives them an extra set of eyes to help guard against threats – especially at night when visibility is compromised.

Ford collaborated with Intermotive Inc. of Auburn, Calif., which developed and will sell the surveillance mode system along with several other innovative law enforcement products. The system can be installed at Crown, the facility near Ford's Chicago Assembly Plant where lights and other accessories are added, or at local upfitters by working directly with Intermotive.

Surveillance mode is available for the 2014 Ford Police Interceptor sedan and utility vehicle.

For more information on Ford Police Interceptor, visit the Ford Police Interceptor site.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 21 Comments
      Dean
      • 1 Year Ago
      Looks like interesting technology. On another note, I know there are lots of you out there lamenting the loss of the Crown Vic, but it looks like the Police Interceptors are quickly gaining acceptance (at least in the DC area). They may not have the RWD, or handling (or lack thereof?), but last I checked, what they do have will keep up with a majority of what's on the roads (police aren't always chasing high-powered sports cars, or sport bikes). Last I checked, you still can't outrun the radio, or helicopters.
        scooter
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Dean
        The Taurus Interceptors will run rings aroudn the Vic and beat it in acceleration with either engine option
        John
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Dean
        The new Ford Intercepter handles better, brakes better and is faster with a great AWD system that easily trumps the CV in inclimate weather. Although it is a huge change from the crown vic. I still prefer the chargers myself but the hood is a lot higher (than the CV) and leads to reduced visibility at times.
        Dean
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Dean
        I stand corrected.
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
      M5_4_life
      • 1 Year Ago
      If anything, it's civilians that need more protection from these thugs!
        Shoosh Yu Tu
        • 1 Year Ago
        @M5_4_life
        You are referring to the South African scenario, right? If so you are spot on they are out of control.
      JaredN
      • 1 Year Ago
      A system like this might have saved the life of MIT police officer Sean Collier, RIP.
        Peter_G
        • 1 Year Ago
        @JaredN
        50/50. One report I read said they creped up behind him and opened fire. I don't think squad cars use bullet proof glass and this sensor would have only worked if they got in range of it before opening fire. Sad either way though.
          JaredN
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Peter_G
          Peter: Any warning would have been better than none.
      daewootech
      • 1 Year Ago
      Is this really that much of a problem? when have you ever heard of someone sneaking up to a police officer to jack his car, or jump in for a ride, "this isn't grand theft auto baby".... Seriously, does it also detect skin color and lock your doors for you when profiled people walk by? I would imagine someone who is trained to pay attention to their surrounds would be paying attention to thier surroundings? Also, do they normally park in shady remote locations to "finish paperwork" and "use the computer"(pr0n...)?
        • 1 Year Ago
        @daewootech
        [blocked]
          clquake
          • 1 Year Ago
          There are requirements for police officers. 120lb females are unlikely to be able to fulfill them.
        merlot066
        • 1 Year Ago
        @daewootech
        Alright, let's settle down a bit. There is a clear benefit to be had from this system and it is very simple to implement with the systems already in place on these cars.
      jay4e
      • 1 Year Ago
      Interesting, idea... im just curious how many cops are now going to lock themselves out of their cars....
        frost54661
        • 1 Year Ago
        @jay4e
        How? The drivers side window only is up. Passenger side window is down.
      clquake
      • 1 Year Ago
      So what happens when the officer gets out and walks behind the car with the keys still in the car?
        quintquintr
        • 1 Year Ago
        @clquake
        Good question. I would suppose that these the Police Interceptor Tauruses come equipped with the coded entry keypad on the door, so officers could just enter the code to regain entry to their cars. Or maybe there's a weight sensor in the driver's seat to prevent that from occurring.
        Randy
        • 1 Year Ago
        @clquake
        Patent the solution and you'll make a buck friend.
      Rich
      • 1 Year Ago
      My cops around my area have a free-solution... gather 5-15 squad cars in the Starbucks parking lot and chit chat.
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