General Motors is just coming off a complete redesign of the Chevrolet Silverado and GMC Sierra for 2014, but in the US fullsize truck market, there is no rest for the weary. According to Reuters, plans are already unfurling for both trucks to drop pounds from their curb weight over the next few years, but this will unlikely be able to keep pace with the 700-pound diet targeted for the next-generation Ford F-150, a truck expected to debut late next year.

The biggest weight reduction for these trucks might not be available until the next full redesign, which will likely happen around 2019, but the article says that smaller updates could shave pounds in the meantime. Two examples given include an "aluminum-intensive" version of the Silverado that could shed 250 pounds and debut around the same time as the lighter-weight, aluminum-bodied 2015 Ford, and there is also talk of reducing weight for driveline components such as axles and driveshafts. These changes are all part of an attempt to meet strict new fuel economy standards coming in 2017, targets which will get even tougher in 2025.


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      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
        stonehunte
        • 1 Year Ago
        Very few people could afford the gas for a half ton in Europe. I would cost a fortune to bring them to market in Europe and then outside of maybe fleet sales, no one would buy them.. On the contrary, I wish we could get the hilux diesel here in the US.
      Hazdaz
      • 1 Year Ago
      Its great that GM is looking into this, but it also seems like they are a little late to the party... they JUST released this new truck. Why not implement some of these weight savings before releasing a new generation. Even waiting 6 months might have been a good idea. Reworking an existing design is typically not as fruitful, nor a cheap, as it could be if given a clean slate.
      Spec
      • 1 Year Ago
      Yeah, the big 3 are making a lot of money selling these beasts in North Dakota and Texas . . . . but a lot of working people need more efficient trucks so fuel costs don't eat up all their profits.
      Rex Monaco
      • 1 Year Ago
      If your sports car is plastic then why not your trucks? It'd prevent dings and it's recyclable. Workers and greens both win. Just don't tell 'em about the manual transmission big engine option with equipment delete. They might get the wrong idea. It's really a low cost work truck for big payloads. Really.
        Dave
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Rex Monaco
        The exterior of the bed of my 99 Ford Ranger is plastic. The interior is metal. GM built entire truck beds from plastic back in 2001: http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2011/08/when-gm-couldnt-think-outside-the-box-remembering-pro-tec/
          icemilkcoffee
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Dave
          Frankly plastic truck beds make pretty good sense. You wouldn't have to worry about coating it with a liner, and you would never have to worry about rust.
      EJD1984
      • 1 Year Ago
      Get Richard Simmons to be the redesign Project Lead Engineer. :-)
      cpmanx
      • 1 Year Ago
      From the Reuters story on which this one is based: "We're going to look at all the levers we can pull - materials, aerodynamics, powertrain - to continue to improve fuel efficiency, both on an interim basis and as we go to the next-generation trucks," GM spokesman Tom Wilkinson said. The big unknown right now is whether Ford will truly realize the planned 700-pound weight savings. It will also be interesting to see how efficient the new "nano" V6 family will be. Hard to imagine a 2.9L turbo in an F-150, but apparently that is coming.
      Jason Krumvieda
      • 1 Year Ago
      When will GM bring something to the market first? They may build good trucks but they are ideas that Ford and Dodge have been running with for 3-4 years already.
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Jason Krumvieda
        [blocked]
          John
          • 1 Year Ago
          Ford Wasn't the first, just one of the most wide spread from $20k cars on up to $70k trucks. The MFT is a great system when you know how to use it. I love mine in my wifes '12 Focus but she doesn't care much for it because she's never taken the time to learn the system. I fear thats the main reason that it gets such horrible reviews. If the sales consultant would take more time to explain the system it would make all the difference.
          Carpinions
          • 1 Year Ago
          John, many times the last person a buyer wants to deal with for help is the sales guy. Half of them have no idea what they're selling for one thing. I've walked into a Nissan dealership and had one tell me an Altima 4-cyl had 250hp. On top of that, they can barely hide the fact they're trying to just get you into something to get you out the door with a sale. I've been to Big 3 dealerships where the sales guys stand like Secret Service agents waiting to pounce the second your tire turns toward their lot. Perhaps you've been luckier but the sales guy is the last person I'd go to.
      RonMcCord
      • 1 Year Ago
      Try reducing the size to 1990 levels as well while you are at it instead of each new generation getting bigger and longer
        The Wasp
        • 1 Year Ago
        @RonMcCord
        It is kind of silly that Ford, Dodge, and GM all introduced 'HD' versions of their trucks but the light duty, 1/2 ton trucks kept growing anyway.
        JaredN
        • 1 Year Ago
        @RonMcCord
        Exactly, Ron. Light duty pickups are now larger than one-ton pickups used to be. They are frickin' huge, too big to easily fit in the parking garage where I work. I'd like a pickup, but the fullsize pickups are bigger than I need and big enough to be a royal pain in the backside in places like Boston.
        Steve H
        • 1 Year Ago
        @RonMcCord
        Couldn't agree more--it's darn near impossible to reach over the side of the bed on any of the recent monstrosities.
        Brewman15
        • 1 Year Ago
        @RonMcCord
        It's a wonderful idea. I totally agree, but unfortunately, that would require a lot of Americans to go back to 1990s sizes as well. :)
        Paul P.
        • 1 Year Ago
        @RonMcCord
        1999 F150 SuperCab Long Bed 4x4: 244.3" length 79.5" width 75.1" height 30" tires max 2014 F150 Supercab Long Bed 4x4: 250.4" Length 79.2" width 75.7" height 32" tires max In overall dimensions, older half tons aren't that much smaller than newer half tons.
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
        • 1 Year Ago
        [blocked]
          Carpinions
          • 1 Year Ago
          Not only being #2, but most years outselling Ram 2:1.
          cfphelps
          • 1 Year Ago
          And some years combined Sierra + Silverado numbers pass F-150 numbers, but usually Ford groups all F-series into one lump.
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
        Chris
        • 1 Year Ago
        Right, because a Tesla can do everything a truck can. BTW, Dan Fredericksen, I'm liking your new name, particularly the "Plateau" part. It suits you much better as it basically sums up your posts on here. For those who don't know, he's been shilling for EVs on this site for years.
          John
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Chris
          The two rear seats are designed as kid seats only and due to the location & safety concerns they're 5 point harness equipped. On top of that you no longer have trunk space when the seats are in use. A truck can fit 6 adults fairly comfortably and still haul something in the bed and carry a full size trailer.
          2 wheeled menace
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Chris
          A Tesla can haul more people than a truck actually, lol.
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Chris
          [blocked]
      whofan
      • 1 Year Ago
      The Half ton trucks keep growing. My 2001 Silverado looks like a midsized truck compared to the new ones. Looking forward to the new Colorado launch. The half tons are too big.
      turboawdftw
      • 1 Year Ago
      uh yes there's a really good way to meet fuel economy standards without using expensive to build (and even more expensive to fix) aluminium body parts --- ITS CALLED A DIESEL ENGINE! a 3.0L turbo diesel will be just fine for these full size pickups...
        Sean Conrad
        • 1 Year Ago
        @turboawdftw
        Or they could just trying doing something crazy, like selling smaller trucks. I would be flabbergasted if any less than 80% of trucks sold were were never used for anything that a regular sedan or SUV couldn't do just as well.
          Matt
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Sean Conrad
          They sell what the market demands
          Ryan
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Sean Conrad
          They sell what they choose to make. Everyone was doing fine in the 80s and 90s with S-10s.
          turboawdftw
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Sean Conrad
          the do sell smaller trucks, but no body wants them. the ranger has not been updated because no body buys them. this is muricuh! where we have to buy something large "just-in-case" ... a small ranger size pickup with a diesel engine will easily give 30+ mpg.
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Sean Conrad
          [blocked]
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