Addressing the safety concerns of its customers, BMW Motorrad is co-developing a rider suit with Dainese to feature something that's much more common in automobiles: airbags.
Starting with Dainese's D-air Protect System, which is made up of inflatable protectors that deploy in 15 milliseconds, the two companies will integrate the technology into a BMW Motorrad brand, one-piece racing suit, the DoubleR RaceAir. Later a different, street-oriented airbag system that can be retrofitted to bikes will be offered to Beemer riders.

The DoubleR RaceAir is expected to be presented at the EICMA motorcycle show in Milan in November, after all required crash testing has been completed.

In addition to the new racing suit, BMW Motorrad and Dainese have agreed to long-term cooperation to develop more safety gear.

Having proper safety gear equipped while riding a motorcycle is crucial, but the rider is the most important piece of the safety puzzle, so ride safely! Scroll down for the press release and to watch a video of the D-air airbag system in action.



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BMW Motorrad and Dainese agree on longterm cooperation.Development of a system for improving passive protection for motorcyclists.

17.07.2013

DoubleR RaceAir with D-Air® racing protectors

Munich / Molvena. BMW Motorrad and Dainese have announced that they are to cooperate in a joint development of innovative motorcycle safety clothing for BMW Motorrad. Taking the Dainese D-Air® Protect System as its starting point, the partners will be developing motorcycle rider equipment with fully integrated inflatable protectors for BMW Motorrad.

The first product to emerge from the cooperation will be the DoubleR RaceAir one-piece leather suit with D-Air® racing protectors, designed exclusively for use on racetracks. The racing suit is scheduled to be presented at the international EICMA motorcycle show in Milan this November, once BMW Motorrad has completed all the required testing in Munich.

The next stage will be to develop the Dainese D-Air® Street System as a retrofit solution for BMW Motorrad. The system is scheduled to be launched in 2015, following successful completion of all the crash tests. BMW Motorrad customers will then be able to retrofit an innovative safety system to their motorcycles.

BMW Motorrad and Dainese are also looking into further ways of cooperating in the interest of providing further protection for motorcycle riders.

BMW Motorrad is the only motorcycle manufacturer to have developed the complete range of rider equipment ever since the 1970s - from motorcycle helmets to rider suits, boots and gloves. In doing so, high priority is attached to maximum comfort for the rider as well as minimising the potential consequences of accidents.

In addition to the NP protectors for motorcycle suits developed by BMW Motorrad as well as safety-optimised boots and gloves, the Neck Brace System introduced in 2007 also contributes to the safety system.

The ABS pioneer BMW Motorrad has always regarded motorcycling and safety as being inseparably linked and anchored in the "Safety 360°" principle. "Safety 360°" breaks down the overall concept of safe motorcycling into three facets: safety technology in the vehicle, safety deriving from rider equipment and safety through rider training

Having maintained its leading role for decades when it comes to active and passive motorcycling safety, BMW is now extending this position further through its long-term collaboration with Dainese.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 27 Comments
      G8
      • 1 Year Ago
      How about a suit that fills up with foam like the police car Sylvester Stallone drove in Demolition Man? SecureFoam, it was called. Just found a video on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RnyhkBU1yaw
      SG Newman
      • 1 Year Ago
      This is not new, and it's not BMW Dainese's idea. Alpinestars has had this technology in motorcycle racing like MotoGP for a couple years now, and after big crashes they release the data to show how it all works (a g force spike when the bike falls, another when the rider hits, etc). It has been working quite well, but this idea is not new to the companies listed in this article.
      dea5787
      • 1 Year Ago
      Was the excessive rolling around on the ground really necessary? I guess they're really trying to justify these airbags. They really didn't seem to help out all that much though. There was sooo much airbag that deployed that was never even used :-/
        ChrisDPrice
        • 1 Year Ago
        @dea5787
        Excessive rolling around? hahaha -- I'm guessing you have never fallen off a bike, or out of a vehicle at speed. What do you think happens?
          • 1 Year Ago
          @ChrisDPrice
          [blocked]
          Bobby_Sards
          • 1 Year Ago
          @ChrisDPrice
          Definitely excessive rolling around
          dea5787
          • 1 Year Ago
          @ChrisDPrice
          @ChrisDPrice, Fallen out of a vehicle? No. Fallen off a motorcycle? Plenty of times. I have the scars to prove it. Anyway, watch the video again. He rolls around more than usual in an effort to show off these airbags.
      sinistro79
      • 1 Year Ago
      Putting airbags in a rider suit is the equivalent of putting breast implants in men. Only BMW would advocate for something like this.
      H Town
      • 1 Year Ago
      D-air airbag? Can they just shorten it to D-bag? Has a certain ring to it. It's not like nobody's said "Check out that D-bag on that BMW!" before.
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
      Jesse Gurr
      • 1 Year Ago
      Oh so they use real people to crash test it? oh good.
      wat
      • 1 Year Ago
      Really interested to find out how the suit detects a crash is imminent or happening...
      Steve Mulcahy
      • 1 Year Ago
      A friend of mine was t-boned by a car, her pelvis was smashed to bits by her fuel tank. This airbag would've done nothing (luckily, she's recovered and plays rugby and boxes). My uncle died the year before I was born, his helmet struck a lamp post when he was hit by a car. Again, the airbag probably wouldn't have helped. Bikes are inherently dangerous. I am still going to go toke my msf course though, as they are also fun and are great way for drivers to be more aware when they aren't riding a bike. I know even just riding a little 50cc when I was 16-18 and getting hit off of it once made me a more aware and careful car driver.
        rboote
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Steve Mulcahy
        Sorry for the folks in your examples, but honestly, so what? Because it wouldn't have helped in that situation it somehow lessens the importance? More than one person has been killed by being trapped in a car by a malfunctioning seatbelt, it doesn't make the seatbelt a bad idea. Bikes may be inherently dangerous but I bet you're far more likely to see dangerous riding exhibited by some idiot clad in shorts and a tank top or Jeans and an HD shirt that someone in full protective gear. Why not, as a rider, improve your chances of survival/reduce chances of injury if this technology is proven to work?
        imag
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Steve Mulcahy
        Funny that you said bikes are inherently dangerous. From your stories, it sounds like *cars* are more dangerous!
          Steve Mulcahy
          • 1 Year Ago
          @imag
          Sorry, didn't phrase it right, but yeah, cars have crumple zones and all sort of safety devices. Unfortunately bikes don't have any of that. Those drivers were careless, but they neither died or went through months of recovery. As a driver, looking out for smaller objects and checking those blind spots go such a long way in saving lives and hospital trips. The problem I've always had was with bikers in shorts/tshirts or full face helmets perched on top of their heads as they ride. Our skin and bones need as much help as they can get. I guess that this suit can have some benefits, I'd just hate for people to think they're invincible while wearing them.
          imag
          • 1 Year Ago
          @imag
          I was being facetious :) I understand what you meant - it was just morbidly amusing that in all the cases you mentioned, the cars (their drivers, really) were the problem.
      Super D Spamalot
      • 1 Year Ago
      "Having proper safety gear equipped while riding a motorcycle is crucial, but the rider is the most important piece of the safety puzzle" Good 'ole Autoblog. Concerned for the safety of motorists everywhere.... Until a viral video that glorifies some dick-bag driving/riding in an excessively dangerous manner through traffic catches their eye. Gotta get that ad revenue!
      Pdexter
      • 1 Year Ago
      I really don't understand why people here are against this? If the suit looks like that, it wont ruin your oh so cool look. If this saves you one rib from braking it's already more than worth it.
      Vrrroooom
      • 1 Year Ago
      Still not convinced these are the best way to go. It seems like it will just cause you to roll instead of sliding, which is a lot safer. It may protect you from the initial impact, but once you hit the ground that tumbling is going put your limbs at risk. Also add that to a list of possible one time use items. If you have a good suit you can usually take a few slides and keep wearing it until it tears or is otherwise structurally compromised. This seems like a one time use thing. With the cost of good suits in the $1000+ range I am going to just hold off. The cost of a crash now could be more than half the cost of a track bike. $1000+ for a suit and $800+ for a helmet and then any parts you need to replace. If anything I would get the airbag vest that go over leather suits.
        masteraq
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Vrrroooom
        Sliding vs. rolling: agree that rolling is more dangerous. However, if the coefficient of friction of the airbag material is less than the coefficient of friction of leather, the airbag will be less likely to cause rolling. "The cost of a crash now could be more than half the cost of a track bike. $1000+ for a suit and $800+ for a helmet and then any parts you need to replace." Why yes! The cost of a crash can be much more than half the cost of a track bike. Much, much, more, if you know what I mean.
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