Just one year ago, many in the auto industry were starting to question the commercial viability of the Nissan Leaf electric vehicle. Sales lagged far behind projections, causing many to wonder if Nissan wasted time, energy and money to be early to market with a car that no one wanted. Nissan Struggling To Keep Up With Leaf Demand
Just one year ago, many in the auto industry were starting to question the commercial viability of the Nissan Leaf electric vehicle. Sales lagged far behind projections, causing many to wonder if Nissan wasted time, energy and money to be early to market with a car that no one wanted.

According to a new report from Automotive News, however, Nissan is currently struggling to produce enough of the EVs to meet demand, thanks, in part, to a surge in interest in some unconventional places.

Buying an EV has become a practical thing to do.
The Leaf has met heavy demand in a few surprising markets. While conventional thinking is that EVs are most popular in West Coast cities like San Francisco, Los Angeles and Seattle--which is true, to a certain extent--the Leaf has become quite a hit in Dallas, St. Louis, Atlanta, Chicago and Raleigh.

Because people in these Midwest and Southern markets generally have shorter commutes than their West Coast counterparts, have places to charge overnight and have become victim to higher gas prices, buying an EV has become a practical thing to do.

Of course, we can't discount the fact that the Leaf is now much cheaper than ever. A new trim line introduced earlier this year, the S, cut the base sticker price of the car down to $28,800. And that doesn't even include a $7,500 tax credit from the federal government. When all is said and done, buyers can get into a LEAF for around $21,000. That's pretty enticing, no matter where you are.

[Source: Automotive News]

TRANSLOGIC 17: Nissan Leaf


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