Tesla continues to impress, with high demand pushing the small, California-based company well beyond its initial projections of 400 Model S EVs per week. According to Tesla CEO Elon Musk, "We're above 400 a week at the current manpower, and not trivially above it." If things continue at the current pace, Tesla's Fremont, California factory, former home of the General Motors/Toyota NUMMI facility, will be pumping out 800 cars per week by late 2014.

That number will eventually come to include the Model X SUV and a smaller, more affordable alternative to the Model S. There's even chatter of a compact SUV, according to a story from Bloomberg.

Even if Tesla produces 800 cars per week for an entire year, the company hasn't even approached the maximum capacity of its Fremont factory. The NUMMI facility was producing 500,000 units per year during its glory days. And while that number is still far off for Tesla, Musk claims it'll happen eventually. "We going to have every kind of car you could possibly imagine. If it moves, we'll make it."

What do you think? Is Tesla expanding too quickly, or not fast enough? Sound off in the comments.


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  • 179 Comments
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
        m_2012
        • 1 Year Ago
        Gen III car is what you are thinking of. Little more than a year away.
      Scooter
      • 1 Year Ago
      I think "average joes" still have a problem with the pricing, but it represents a significant change in the industry. Elon Musk simply isn't going to wait around for changes to occur, he's actively making the changes himself. Remember the Prius was quite pricey in its infancy days, now its creation has lead to a significant direction change in the industry which we can all benefit from. You will see the most normal car, one of the best offerings in premium luxury, the Model S, bringing a permanent change to the industry. It's going to start a wave of EV's that look "normal", feel regular inside and out, yet bring stellar performance to the table.
        raktmn
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Scooter
        "average joes" don't buy brand new cars at all. The median household income for US new car buyers is close to 70K per year. 50% higher than the median income of those "average joes" you talk about. Joe Average buys used gas cars, and will buy used EV's too.
        ChrisH
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Scooter
        it is a car for one percenters Technically I could afford a 70k car, I am just not stupid enough to pay that for something with wheels
          Rob Mahrt
          • 1 Year Ago
          @ChrisH
          Oh, and their production goal of 20k units is equal to .005% of the population per year. So, they should be okay.
          Rob Mahrt
          • 1 Year Ago
          @ChrisH
          If you are an individual (unmarried) that makes $100k, you can afford to buy this car if you so choose. That is 4% of the single filers in the country. So technically, this car is for the 4 percenters.
          Bernard
          • 1 Year Ago
          @ChrisH
          I know a Tesla owner and he is not a millionaire. I could get one if I traded in my G coupe, not that I have any plans to give up my only sports car any time soon.
          jpadow
          • 1 Year Ago
          @ChrisH
          "I am just not stupid enough to pay that for something with wheels" Really? I'd pay at least that much for a motor home. actually way more.
          BraveLil'Toaster
          • 1 Year Ago
          @ChrisH
          Considering the number of cars they've already sold, this is a load of Bolshevik.
          Marcopolo
          • 1 Year Ago
          @ChrisH
          @ ChrisH " I am just not stupid enough to pay that for something with wheels" Your principles come cheap !
      Greg
      • 1 Year Ago
      Tesla must not outproduce its demand. Sure, right now it has more demand than production, but once they satisfy the 'early adopters,' will there be enough buyers left to maintain them? If not, they need to be patient. However, new models would be the best thing for creating new demand. I'm personally very eager to see a small, 3-series competitor. If they can actually hit the $30k price target, I'm going to be all over it.
        ElectricAvenue
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Greg
        How many years of production will it take before buyers are no longer considered "early adopters"? If you don't have to wait more than a couple of months from order to delivery, and there's already been 15,000 or so delivered, can you really be considered an early adopter?
        raktmn
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Greg
        Earlier this spring we hit 100,000 EV sales in the US. We are past early adopters already.
          axiomatik
          • 1 Year Ago
          @raktmn
          We haven't passed the early-adopter phase yet. Cars are not like consumer electronics. Most people don't just run out and buy a car, like they might a new tablet. Some people did, and some people happened to be already in the market for a new car when the Tesla became available. The vast majority of the market is still "wait and see" concerning EVs. Once those "wait and seers" start buying, that is when we have passed the early adopter phase.
      Spec
      • 1 Year Ago
      That is great. But I think what they really need to work on is making sure they have enough customers for all those cars. So far so good. And I think the cars that have been shipped are impressing people and gaining more fans. But they really need to keep stealing marketshare from Audi, Cadillac, BMW, Benz, Lexus, Acura, and other luxury brands to keep going. I doubt those companies stand still.
        skierpage
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Spec
        Apart from Cadillac and Lexus, those other companies *have* effectively stood still. They offer subpar hybrid versions of their luxury cars, they've engaged in a horsepower war divorced from what most people want, and not one of them is selling a luxury sedan that that can plug in nor do they have one scheduled for production, let alone a fully-electric Model S competitor. Audi and Benz thought they could dip a toe in the water with expensive niche sports cars that barely surpass the discontinued Tesla Roadster, while the Model S is a direct assault on their main business. The BMW i3 may yet be a hit, we'll see. But everyone else is four or more years away from making a full-electric sedan and they don't sound like they're planning a dedicated model that will optimize for battery layout. Most importantly none has arranged the production or purchase of literally tens of millions of pounds of batteries that a volume electric car requires.
        Dean Hammond
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Spec
        bingo,my thoughts exactly...its not like the market will remain dormant.....
        Rob Mahrt
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Spec
        I would think this "late 2014" number would include 400/week model Xs, but perhaps not. If it does, this should help support your statement though. Another vehicle, at a lower price than the X, in a different segment, should help eat into marketshare.
      Scooter
      • 1 Year Ago
      Love the Model S although around 1000~1300+ a month in payments, its still looking like a car best suited for individuals or households with over $125,000 take home annual pay. With regards to the under $40,000 model, I seriously have my doubts it will be priced under $40,000. While the Tesla S is a great car, its weighed down in pricing with too many premium comforts and materials. I was thinking for a while by the time they introduce the cheaper model, I would be considering buying one. Although my fear is that the car will be "too premium". Many of the basic elements of the Model S are simply too pricey. I think by the time it enters production we may have better alternatives.
        Rob Mahrt
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Scooter
        The lowest level of the car will probably fall in the 40s, but yes, the higher performance, longer range, and all options would probably be in the 50s or 60s. On par with the BMW 3 sries is the goal. Go build one on BMW.com and you can see there is a huge range of cost from top of the line to bottom of the line. So it all depends on your needs and wants. Do you need a full panoramic roof, premium air suspension and audio system, etc. The options are where they make their money and where the price goes way up.
        raktmn
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Scooter
        Depending upon your personal situation, the true net cost can be much less than 1,000-1,300 a month. Especially if you own your own business. You can play with the variables for your own situation here (YMMV): http://www.teslamotors.com/true-cost-of-ownership
      Griffen W
      • 1 Year Ago
      Tesla HAS to expand rapidly. Right now they are a small fish in a REALLY big pond. They're competing, and rather succesfully it seems for now, in a market where there are some leviathans (GM, the VAG, Toyota, etc) whose R&D budgets probably are as big as Tesla's entire operating costs.. Tesla right now is a rather small company compared to the others and can react much quicker, and much more focused, to changes in the market. They HAVE to get a foot in the door in as many segments as they can because once one of the established makes fills it it I think it will be incredibly hard for Tesla to challenge them.
      Ron
      • 1 Year Ago
      I am shocked there are that many stupid people with that kind of money. ...
        Noah
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Ron
        So, Ron... Why exactly are they stupid?
        JaredN
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Ron
        Every review that I've read of the Model S says it is a great car. And those reviews don't qualify it as "it is a great electric car", but that it is a great car, period. The Model S is very roomy. It is very, very fast (supercar acceleration). It handles and rides well. It is very quiet. There are a couple Model Ss that park in the garage at my office. They are flat out beautiful cars, IMO. I don't need a car that big and I can't afford a Model S. But if they come out with a smaller car at a lower price (say $35k), I would consider buying one as my commuter car. Then I could leave my pig of an SUV at home during the week. I was a huge naysayer at the beginning of Tesla. With all of the delays of the Roadster and the fact that it was essentially a Lotus kitcar, I predicted that the Model S would never be built in any numbers and that there was no way they could build it for less than the Roadster. Well, I was wrong. Completely wrong. The Model S is a real car and a very fine one at that. No, it isn't very useful for long road trips at the moment. But for many people, that won't be a huge issue.
          banzairx7
          • 1 Year Ago
          @JaredN
          The sport does it in 3.9 seconds. I'd call that super car.
          paulwesterberg
          • 1 Year Ago
          @JaredN
          Motor Trend tested the performance model and found that it could do 0-60 in 3.9 seconds which is definitely high end sports car territory. What is the threshold for supercar performance? 3.5s? Also I bet that Tesla's single gear transmission makes very quick launches much easier for a non-professional driver to accomplish. http://www.motortrend.com/roadtests/alternative/1208_2012_tesla_model_s_test_and_range_verification/
          raktmn
          • 1 Year Ago
          @JaredN
          marcma -- 5.5 second 0-60 times become "supercar acceleration" when you buy the Performance package, and the acceleration drops to sub-4 second times. It becomes "supercar acceleration" when it repeatedly and consistently blows BMW M5's out of the water from 0-60. And from 0-100 for that matter.
          Caught At The Curb
          • 1 Year Ago
          @JaredN
          To marcma153 --> The regular 85 and the 60 do 0-60 in 5.5 seconds. The P85 (which account for most of the sales) does 0-60 in 4.0 seconds. The new P85+ may be even faster. That's pretty much getting into supercar territory.
          marcma153
          • 1 Year Ago
          @JaredN
          When did a 5.5 second 0-60 time become "supercar acceleration"?
        Dmitriy Markelov
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Ron
        None clench that title as dearly as you Ron.
      Street King
      • 1 Year Ago
      Anyone that thinks this thing can sustain production like that is seriously asking for it. The stock is artificially inflated and so is the production. The point when these start piling up and languishing is SOON, and will happen before they even finish getting it ready for 800 / week production. Right now they are filling "greenie" orders, and I got news for you, there aren't many of them with 80K to pop on this car. Any production besides the pent up "greenie buyers" is just dealer stock ramp up. Down vote me, but you know its the truth.
        Kern8471
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Street King
        ^"Right now they are filling "greenie" orders" In regards to what Model S drivers drover previously, "...Throughout the day I didn’t meet one person who’d been driving a green car or showed any blatant support for polar bears, the ozone or Al Gore. A Mercedes G wagon, 15 year-old Camry, C63 AMG and a BMW 750 Li - just a handful of the cars previously driven by Model S owners." - Juan Barnet http://oppositelock.jalopnik.com/tesla-and-the-chasm-a-day-with-a-group-of-model-s-own-747762917
        icon149
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Street King
        dealer stock build up? you are simply stupid or ignorant or both, either way don't comment. They have no dealers. they are all direct to customer sales, and they have a huge back log and haven't even started selling internationally (apart from a few here and there). The cars are fantastic in every regard except 1, and that is the limited infrastructure and "slow" recharge rate which they are addressing.
          Dean Hammond
          • 1 Year Ago
          @icon149
          I agree with the first poster, but lets re-word....inventory build up.....IF that indeed happens, GASP....incentives to move aged inventory....and Im not so sure theres a huge back log, thats what is being relayed perhaps as PR....regardless, you take away \"limited\" supply, the game changes....and agreed, they are indeed a fantastic car....cudos to Musk, I wonder how they would be doing wityhout him at the helm....
        raktmn
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Street King
        Street King -- I downvoted per your request. Not only do you not have any proof that Tesla can't sustain 800 / week production, you have failed to address the other problem of your argument. Who cares if they bump up production to 800 / week for the Model S to meet pent-up demand, and then have it taper off over time? By the time it tapers off, Tesla will be so busy selling Model X's, and getting GEN III lower price sedans to market, and 2nd generation Roadsters based upon the GEN III chassis, that it just won't matter. That's like claiming that BMW as a company would be a failure if 7-Series sales tapered off. That would be absurd. Oh, by the way, BMW 7-Series sales have been tapering off in the US for years. Down from 22K units a year 2 decades ago, to half that number (11K units) in 2012. And the Model S is now outselling the BMW 7-Series. Taking your logic to it's natural conclusion, BMW must be doomed, right? You aren't thinking this through.
          Dean Hammond
          • 1 Year Ago
          @raktmn
          one HUGE thing everyone seems to gloss over.....what exactly happens if a MAJOR player comes in with a similar product ( hell, just for $hits and giggles...a BETTER product ) for substantially less, if you dont think they are watching Teslas progress you are dreaming...foe all we know someone is sitting back letting Tesla do all the leg work regarding public acceptance, and once a business case can be made, swoop in and POOF! Elon sells his company......
          raktmn
          • 1 Year Ago
          @raktmn
          Street Dingaling, For every person who owns a 100K dollar luxury car and lives where they can't charge, there are 10's of thousands of people who do have a garage and a place to charge. That is an absurd argument. It is like claiming that the Ford F150 can never be a market success because a king cab long bed truck is too big to park in New York City. FYI - The F150 is America's best selling vehicle of any category going back decades.
          raktmn
          • 1 Year Ago
          @raktmn
          Dean, Electric and PHEV vehicle are currently improving in cost and capabilities at a fairly quick pace. If there is a point in time somewhere in the future where the Fuel Cell becomes competitive with future EV technology, the loser will be gas cars. With at least 2 better choices, gas cars will lose market share to both future EV's and future Fuel Cell vehicles. Just like BMW, Mercedes, Lexus, etc have just lost market share to Model S sales in the last quarter.
          m_2012
          • 1 Year Ago
          @raktmn
          Fuel cells are marketing. Don't get lost on that train.
          Dean Hammond
          • 1 Year Ago
          @raktmn
          m-2012...fuel cells are marketing...think back a few years...EVs were as well......
          Dean Hammond
          • 1 Year Ago
          @raktmn
          lot of speculation there raktmn, I dont doubt some of it will happen, but the car market is extremely fickle to say the least.....what happens when Fuel Cell technology hits the market?...does EV become irrelevent?....
        Spec
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Street King
        It is not "greenies" that are buying Teslas. It is rich people that can afford the hottest luxury car on the market right now. Tesla is not sold as a 'green' car. It is sold as a GREAT car.
        JayH
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Street King
        I read the same thing when the 500 first got to america and it's still selling like hot cakes, breaking records month after month....
          m_2012
          • 1 Year Ago
          @JayH
          Who requires a 3 phase charging station? You can charge the Tesla with an extension cord or a Supercharger or anything in between. Quote being so ignorant and read up before you speak. Most people have sufficient power in their house to charge the Tesla or any other electric at quite a fast rate, cheaply and much easier than going to the gas station.
          Street King
          • 1 Year Ago
          @JayH
          It costs $15,000 and doesn't require you to own a driveway with a 3-phase charge station. Little bit different...
          jkirkebo
          • 1 Year Ago
          @JayH
          Tesla doesn't support 3-phase charging in the US. That is reserved for Europe, where we usually have 400V 3-phase service at home.
        m_2012
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Street King
        Thats EXACTLY what all the people that shorted the stock said. If you feel that way, please short some more stock. My Tesla stock thanks you.
        mawhalen53
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Street King
        Do you have any facts to bolster your argument?
      kontroll
      • 1 Year Ago
      it is mind boggling that you can buy a basic Tesla for around the same price as a POS hunday equus....how on earth can a moron with this much money choose a korean POS over the most sophisticated piece of engineering on the planet??? It's mind boggling the stupidity of some individuals...only in AMERICA!!!
        • 1 Year Ago
        @kontroll
        [blocked]
          CoolWaters
          • 1 Year Ago
          It's just the Tesla is 1000% better.
          CoolWaters
          • 1 Year Ago
          It could be rich people with low self esteem buy the Hyundai.
        Marcopolo
        • 1 Year Ago
        @kontroll
        @ kontroll It's an old thing, but intolerant, abusive comments like yours, can taint even a product as brilliant as the Tesla model S.
          kontroll
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Marcopolo
          what i say or don't say has nothing to do with the brilliance of the Tesla engineering...nothing can taint the Tesla S., however i do admit that I am intolerant with stupid people who buy asian krap at the expense of such beautiful and well engineered product such as the Tesla for the same amount of money...
      mcallen
      • 1 Year Ago
      Go, Tesla, go! Here in Austin, there are at least 100 of them in the wild. Still turns my head every time I see one.
        GR
        • 1 Year Ago
        @mcallen
        Anytime I see one in a parking lot, I usually go out of my way to walk past them and walk very slowly as I do. :-)
        banzairx7
        • 1 Year Ago
        @mcallen
        Saw one on Burnet yesterday myself. Great looking car. If they could get some supercharger infrastructure out here they would be a lot easier sell to us texans. It's so damn far from city to city here.
      Brian
      • 1 Year Ago
      Elon Musk's motivation and drive is seriously inspiring.
      Tom
      • 1 Year Ago
      Are you guys kinding. Me it is common knowledge that anytime a company grows too fast Quality is the first thing to go. But I guess most of you have no common knowledge. It doesnt matter what your math equation states about Current production verses Factory abilities to grow versrs skilled workers or whatever. There's a chance everything will be fine. But look at Toyota While Toyota is still an ok car. As soon as they overtook GM as the worlds largest Auto Manufacture a few years ago recall went up and quality went down. A Toyota of today is no where near as good as a Toyota of 10yrs ago. There's book smarts and street smarts(common sense) just cause you can write a mathmatical equation proving me wrong. Doesnt mean you have common sense to see the big picture. And doesn't mean I'm wrong. Doesnt mean I'm right. Just my take on it
        Tom
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Tom
        This was supposed to be a reply to a comment I made earlier about Quality going down as Production went up. Somehow it was posted as a new post.
        raktmn
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Tom
        Tom, your first failed assumption is that Tesla doesn't have well trained very skilled workers available to hire. Quite the opposite is true. Tesla has attracted best of the best employees from across the nation, along with having a huge pool of former NUMMI employees to pick and choose from. If you don't know about NUMMI, go search the NPR archives for their story on this plant, and how well their work force was operating prior to closure. Your other false assumption is thinking that going from 400 to 800 is a huge deal just because it doubles production. Well, Tesla has successfully doubled production about a dozen times over the last year, while INCREASING quality with each successive doubling of production. There goes that layman's theory.....
          raktmn
          • 1 Year Ago
          @raktmn
          Tom, Growing too fast? The story is about going from 400 to 800 units by late 2014. We're talking roughly 18 months from now. Tom, If you are going to Troll, you have to at least read the title of the story. Stop being a troll.
          Tom
          • 1 Year Ago
          @raktmn
          My fisy assumption is that Tesla is a manufacture. Can we all agree on that. And regardless of if one has skilled workers or not. Or what the buildings production capacity is. Its common knowledge that there is a such thing as Growing too fast. Sometimes when that happens QUALITY goes down. Again I also said I could be wrong....And apparently you don't know the difference between laymans terms and common sense.......Now after all that.Guess we will see.
          archos
          • 1 Year Ago
          @raktmn
          There's no law as "Growing too fast". Quality just doesn't miraculously decline simply because production goes it. It only happens when: (a) new workers added too fast to be properly trained, and (b) cheaper materials replace higher quality materials to buffer higher production costs. Neither is the case with Tesla and unless you have some proof to show it is, shut up.
        m_2012
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Tom
        Put your money where your mouth is and bet against them. Its going to be my theme for the day. You are talking GM and Toyota. The only thing Tesla has in common with them is they both build a product with 4 tires. Thats it. They were able to take the GM/Toyota plant (that GM said was worthless) and turn it into the most state-of-the plant in less time than it took GM to destroy the place previously.
          Tom
          • 1 Year Ago
          @m_2012
          You jack wagon I'm talking about all companies that produce any kind of goods. I was usuing Toyota as an example. You are one of the ones I was talking about who have no concept on reality. And for the record I'm not saying it will definitely happend I'm just saying its a good possibility
        SLT
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Tom
        Probably the same Tom from myspace
          Tom
          • 1 Year Ago
          @SLT
          How did you know?....
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