We're feeling warm and fuzzy about the Nutmeg State after Connecticut leaders said it would earmark $200,000 for the purpose of getting more businesses to install electric-vehicle charging stations. The Connecticut Departments of Energy and Environmental Protection are behind the initiative, which is part of Governor Dannel Malloy's broader energy strategy. State leaders and the Department of Energy's eGallon rating say that recharging an EV in the state costs the equivalent of paying about $1.70 per gallon of gas, a price that certain political pundits will point out hasn't been seen on liquid gas pumps since about the time President Obama took office in early 2009.

As of late last month, Connecticut was home to about 80 publicly accessible charging stations, or about one per every 21,000 light-duty vehicles registered in the state. That's about on par with the US average. Connecticut joins states such as Hawaii that are trying to do their part to encourage EV adoption. The Aloha state's utilities will offer specially reduced electricity rates businesses can access when they install public charging stations. Check out the Connecticut press release below.
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DEEP and DOT Announce Details of Major Electric Vehicle Charging Initiative

Announcement comes at EVConnecticut Expo at Middlesex Community College

EDITOR'S NOTE: The EV Expo takes place today, July 9, from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. at Chapman Hall on the campus of Middlesex Community College. The announcement of the EVConnecticut Incentives program will take place during the 11:15 speaking program.

The cure for "range anxiety" in Connecticut is now in sight thanks to a new initiative from the State of Connecticut to provide financial incentives for private businesses and municipalities that are interested in installing publicly accessible electric vehicle charging stations.

Speaking at an Electric Vehicle (EV) Expo at Middlesex Community College, Commissioner Daniel C. Esty of the Connecticut Departments of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP) and Commissioner James P. Redeker of the Connecticut Department of Transportation (DOT) said the goal of the new program is to more than double the 81 publicly available charging stations in the state to 200 by the end of 2013.

Esty and Redeker said $200,000 in funding for the installation of electric vehicle charging stations will be awarded to proposals that provide the most matching funding from the project host site, are most accessible to the general public, and deploy charging stations in geographically diverse areas.

Businesses and municipalities that are interested in participating in the EV Incentives program should send an email indicating interest to EVConnecticut@ct.gov . They can also find more information by visiting the EVConnecticut website at www.ct.gov/deep/evconnecticut .

"Encouraging the use of alternative vehicles and alternative fuels is a key element of Governor Malloy's energy strategy," Commissioner Esty said. "Electric vehicles run cleaner and are less harmful to the environment, and they are also more energy efficient and on average cheaper to operate than conventional fuel vehicles. Expanding the number of charging stations available to the public will help decrease motorists' concerns about running out of power in their electric vehicles ("range anxiety") and result in increasing sales of EVs."

DOT Commissioner James P. Redeker said,"The transportation sector accounts for nearly one-third of the energy consumed in Connecticut and produces roughly 40% of the state's greenhouse emissions. The Governor's Comprehensive Energy Strategy supports the deployment of electric vehicle charging stations to help speed the transition to electric vehicles for Connecticut residents and businesses."

EVConnecticut is preparing Connecticut for a rapid and seamless integration of electric vehicles into the market by providing resources and information to owners of EVs and by expanding the availability of EV charging stations. The state is working to identify and catalogue all existing public electric vehicle charging stations open in Connecticut and will now be providing incentives to municipalities and private businesses for installation of additional charging stations.

A recent federal Department of Energy study shows that cost of operating an electric vehicle in Connecticut is around the equivalent of being able to access $1.70/gallon gasoline. By aggressively increasing the number of charging stations, the new state initiative will make it easier than ever to purchase, drive, and maintain an electric vehicle.

At today's EVConnecticut Expo, visitors will have the opportunity to:

Explore the newest EV models on the market
Meet with EV professionals and other EV enthusiasts
Have all of their EV questions answered in one place
Compare different EV charging stations
Lean about Connecticut's plans for significantly expanding the number of EV charging stations in the state

For information on additional ways Connecticut residents can make smart energy choices, visit the EnergizeCT website.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 11 Comments
      Spec
      • 1 Year Ago
      There is plenty of Sun in Connecticut. http://www.nrel.gov/gis/images/us_germany_spain/pvmap_usgermanyspain%20poster-01.jpg
      Dave
      • 1 Year Ago
      There ain't much sun in Connecticut.
      Dave
      • 1 Year Ago
      I'm commenting from Rhode Island. And I'm still waiting for someone to do the math. Because I don't believe a word of this nonsense.
      Dave
      • 1 Year Ago
      Wow. I was really close with my $20,000 estimate. This calculator came up with $21,341 before tax credits: http://www.solar-estimate.org/?page=solar-calculator It seems to be a lower square footage than I thought - only 342. However, I don't have a South-facing roof, so the installation could get real ugly, especially since a few trees would have to go.
      Dave
      • 1 Year Ago
      We're talking about $50 per month for electricity. Or $60 per month for gasoline. Almost no one is going to spend $20,000 (feel free to give me a better estimate) and give up their yard to save that. And I doubt anyone will want to put in the man-hours required to keep the panels free from snow all winter. I'd love to see Nevada and New Mexico covered in solar panels, but it just ain't happening in New England. Even with the ridiculous government subsidies.
      Dave
      • 1 Year Ago
      "State leaders and the Department of Energy's eGallon rating say that recharging an EV in the state costs the equivalent of paying about $1.70 per gallon of gas...." The average cost of residential electricity in Connecticut is 17.4 cents per kwh. http://www.eia.gov/electricity/monthly/epm_table_grapher.cfm?t=epmt_5_6_a So, you can buy a $19,000 Prius C and pay 7.25 cents per mile. (including road tax. 6 cents per mile without) Or you can buy a $29,000 Leaf and pay 5 cents per mile.
        Spec
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Dave
        Well, this is why installing your own solar PV remains one of the few great remaining deals. Lock in cheap electric rates for the next 25+ years.
          bluepongo1
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Spec
          @Dave I am in CT, there are many private, business,& churches which have solar panels ( so they can be off-grid, brown-out back-up, and/or just to save money on electricity) . Where the hell are you commenting this ignorance from?
          bluepongo1
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Spec
          @Dave Pro Tip: you only need unobstructed sun, but you can use a mirror array or junk satellite dishes painted silver to "soft focus" the sun and multiply the panels' output.... and you'll have to figure the rest out yourself. :-P
          Dave
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Spec
          "Even with the ridiculous government subsidies." More than ridiculous, according to that same calculator. The gov't pays for 2/3 of the cost. And that still brings the cost down to about $46 per month on a 30 year note. Without the subsidy, the real cost would be over twice as expensive as gasoline for a Prius.
      bluepongo1
      • 1 Year Ago
      A trivial sum in CT $, (cost of living/per capita income). @ Dave I've never seen a Nissan Leaf in CT, but I've seen a few Prius... Tesla Model S have been at EV gatherings. BTW inbetween a few rain storms it has been 80*- 90* F for weeks and will continue to be hot and sunny for quite a few more weeks.... solar is viable here. :-)