China has a well documented problem with air pollution, with some studies estimating the country's air pollution takes half a decade off its citizens' life expectancies. The People's Republic is the largest producer of greenhouse gases on the planet, thanks to its huge demand for two very dirty things – power and cars.

Now, as what seems like a knee-jerk reaction to the severe pollution problems, the government is implementing regulations to limit auto sales in eight of the dirtiest cities. If implemented, the new purchasing rules could potentially result in a two-percent drop in nationwide sales. Needless to say, that'd be bad for the economy. These measures follow a pollution tax instituted in Beijing just over a month ago.

Despite its rampant growth, a slowing economy is a legitimate concern in China. Vehicle sales may be up 14 percent in 2013, but dealers have been offering ever higher discounts, according to a story on Bloomberg. Fears of a "cash crunch" have gripped the country, as borrowing rates between banks skyrocketed in June, making financing more difficult for potential car buyers.

The China Association of Automobile Manufacturers is also opposing the regulations on more practical grounds, arguing that they "go against efforts to boost consumption, [deprive] people of the equal right to own a car and don't do much to ease traffic jams," according to CAAM spokesman Shi Jianhua.


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 64 Comments
      Jeremy
      • 1 Year Ago
      That not good for manufactures who sell more in China than anywhere else and are putting a lot of investments in the that country
      Rampant
      • 1 Year Ago
      Yes - because the problem is the cars! I wouldn't have anything to do with the massive amounts of factories and power plants.
      IBx27
      • 1 Year Ago
      Hahaha, someone said equal rights in china, that's the best joke I've heard all year!
      bubba_roe
      • 1 Year Ago
      Oh come on guys, humans cant possibly effect the enviroment, Rush Limbaugh says so.
        m3laszlo
        • 1 Year Ago
        @bubba_roe
        Oh come on guys, Communism can't possibly affect the environment, Rush Limbaugh would end up saying See I Told You So.
          Spec
          • 1 Year Ago
          @m3laszlo
          I don't understand m3laszlo's statement.
          Dave
          • 1 Year Ago
          @m3laszlo
          I just upvoted both of you. I'm not sure what that says about by politics.
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
      budwsr25
      • 1 Year Ago
      When did this site become autoAsia? China needs to send it's citizens to driving school before they allow them to drive or buy a car.. There is a website the shows pictures of wreaked cars and most of the updates this past year have been wreaked cars in china.
        raktmn
        • 1 Year Ago
        @budwsr25
        budwsr25: Taking the wise out of budweiser since 1925. Very apt name.
      Kuro Houou
      • 1 Year Ago
      With all their money apparently you would think they would try to invest in more efficient cars or electric cars.
        raktmn
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Kuro Houou
        China has a huge and quickly growing gap between the have's and the have-not's. All that money is concentrating in the hands of a small minority. If you are suggesting that the folks who made a whole lot of money on making products and running companies that caused this pollution, should pay to clean it up, that is probably a good idea. But like all good capitalists, they've successfully privatized the profits to themselves, while socializing the pollution to everyone else. And they aren't about to cut into their own profits to pay for their own pollution.
          johnbravo6
          • 1 Year Ago
          @raktmn
          That's specifically fascism, not capitalism.
      Levine Levine
      • 1 Year Ago
      China's air pollution comes from burning coal, both used at the consumer level and at the power generation plants. China's air pollution gets worst in winter months as consumers resort to personal heaters burning cubes of coal rather than using the more expensive but cleaner electrical heater. China doesn't have as much vehicles as USA but vehicles do add to air pollution, nevertheless.
        Spec
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Levine Levine
        Coal is the biggie but it is certainly not the only contributor. And don't be fooled, they now sell far more cars in China each year than are sold in the USA each year.
          Bryan Rex
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Spec
          Cars create very little greenhouse gasses compared to the coal.. i don't know the exact ratio, but I would not be surprised to see coal burning to cars pollution at a 1000:1 ratio.
          Sir Duke
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Spec
          Chinese buying more cars than Americans is a recent phenomenon, there are still waaaaaay more cars in the US than china. They'll have to out-shop us for about 35 - 40 more years to catch up.
      raktmn
      • 1 Year Ago
      " If implemented, the new purchasing rules could potentially result in a two-percent drop in nationwide sales. Needless to say, that'd be bad for the economy." Of course all the health problems throughout worker's entire lives across every industry is also bad for the economy. As are the premature deaths half a decade before they should happen. The win-win solution is to replace that 2% of car sales with cars that emit zero emissions while driving around town. Then at the same time you get that manufacturing back, and you reduce the health costs and you get back the employee productivity that had been lost due to those health problems. Pay for the extra cost of the zero emissions cars using some of those savings, and by having anyone who is still polluting pay for their pollution.
        GasMan
        • 1 Year Ago
        @raktmn
        Actually people dying shortly after their productive years is good for the economy. It just sucks as public policy.
          brotherkenny4
          • 1 Year Ago
          @GasMan
          Actually, this means not that people live to be 65 instead of 70, but rather that more people die of cancer at a younger age. Possibly in their 30s or 40s. It's kind of like the misnomer commonly accepted in the US about life span. We know that our average life expectancy has been getting longer right? Well, it's because of health and vacinations improvements for childrem mostly. Fewer children die and so our average goes up. However, people who make it to old age all last about the same as they used to. Believe me, if governments could time your death to the point at which you become a non-contributer they would love that.
          Bryan Rex
          • 1 Year Ago
          @GasMan
          brotherkenny4, you are totally factually wrong. Average lifespans are getting much longer... the only thing that isn't changing is the oldest humans remain a constant age. In otherwords, our advances in science haven't created a 150 yr old yet..
      Christopher Smith
      • 1 Year Ago
      God forbid they limit the have the manufacturers limit the emissions the cars sold can release. There are 1 Billion people there. Telling them they can't buy cars in certain cities is beyond stupid and totalitarian. Just like saying they can't reproduce. People need to reproduce and they need cars. America sells the same amount of cars, and we don't have this problem, except in LA. Figure it out, and stop being a toolbag!
        Sir Duke
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Christopher Smith
        Christopher ma brutha: The answer to everything is not just apply the American standard. China has more than three times the amount of people as America does. They still don't have half the infrastructure. Even though they are building at break-neck speed, its the cities that are being overrun. Chinese are leaving the farms and moving to the cities in droves. Public transportation systems is and should be their top priority. That's the thing about dictatorships though, for good or for bad, they can actually do something about what ails them. If this what they have to do until they figure things out, so be it.
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
        ihyln
        • 1 Year Ago
        China should be a republican paradise with so much free market capitalism going on!
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
    • Load More Comments