Just as the words "Chevron," "Shell" and "Arco" can engender a sigh of relief when spotted by a gas-starved driver with an empty tank, the name "Nissan" will be cause for joy for some of their battery-electric-vehicle driving counterparts. The Japanese automaker is making it easier to charge up its all-electric Leaf quickly by adding DC fast chargers to many of its US dealerships. Specifically, Nissan will add more than 100 stations in 21 metropolitan areas and says those chargers can provide enough charge in the Leaf for 80 percent battery capacity in about a half hour.

So far, Nissan's pilot program for quick-charging stations along the US West Coast has resulted in an average of almost five charges per day, and those numbers are on the rise. Some dealers, such as Nissan of Downtown Los Angeles, are giving out an average of 10 charges a day with their stations, which use the CHAdeMO standard and are made by AeroVironment.

In May, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) rated the 2013 Leaf's fuel efficiency at 115 miles per gallon-equivalent (MPGe), up from 99 MPGe, and that the car's single-charge range also increased. Nissan is looking to keep the sales momentum going for what so far's been good year for the Leaf. Through June, Leaf sales had more than tripled from a year earlier to 9,839 units. Check out Nissan's press release below.
Show full PR text
Nissan To Add Electric Vehicle Quick Charging At More Than 100 U.S. LEAF-Certified Dealerships

Quick charge units can recharge Nissan LEAF to 80 percent in about 30 minutes

NASHVILLE, Tenn., July 8, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- In an effort to speed the expansion of electric vehicle charging and build consumer awareness of the capability of the all-electric Nissan LEAF, Nissan will support installation of more than 100 DC quick chargers at LEAF-certified dealers in 21 key markets nationwide.

The units, which use the CHAdeMO standard, can charge the vehicle from depleted to about 80 percent in about 30 minutes.

Brendan Jones, director of Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Strategy, Nissan said: "Nissan is undertaking a proactive, multi-pronged approach to expand charging infrastructure to enhance awareness of electric cars like the LEAF and instill range confidence in potential customers. We know that available charging infrastructure opens the doors for more Nissan LEAF sales."

This quick charging initiative follows a 24-dealer pilot program, which Nissan rolled out at dealerships in the markets of San Francisco, Los Angeles, San Diego, Sacramento and Seattle. During the pilot, Nissan has been able to study the frequency of use for the chargers and the impact that charging has on the dealer's operations.

"We are located at the intersection of two of the country's busiest freeways, so having a quick charger available for the thousands of commuters who drive by us every day is a boon for business," said Richard Luengo, general manager, Nissan of Downtown Los Angeles, which is averaging about 10 charging sessions per day at its quick charger. "There is a steady stream of folks using the charger, and we've generated significant good will in the LEAF community. Over the past four months, our dealership has seen a marked improvement in sales, and some of that is clearly attributable to the new quick charger."

So far, the active chargers in the program have been popular. Since the pilot began, about 5,600 charging sessions have taken place, with each location averaging about 4.5 sessions per day. That figure has been steadily on the rise as awareness has increased. Over the period of June 21-July 1, the number of charging sessions increased about 12.5 percent compared to the previous two-week period.

Installation of new chargers will begin in east coast markets, starting this summer. By April 1, 2014, Nissan expects to have quick chargers installed and operational at 100 additional dealerships.

Nissan's charging partner AeroVironment will supply the quick chargers and will provide installation services for nearly all of the new quick charging units.

About Nissan North America
In North America, Nissan's operations include automotive styling, engineering, consumer and corporate financing, sales and marketing, distribution and manufacturing. Nissan is dedicated to improving the environment under the Nissan Green Program and has been recognized as an ENERGY STAR® Partner of the Year in 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013 by the U.S Environmental Protection Agency. More information on Nissan in North America and the complete line of Nissan and Infiniti vehicles can be found online at www.NissanUSA.com and www.InfinitiUSA.com, or visit the Americas media sites NissanNews.com and InfinitiNews.com.

About Nissan Motor Co.
Nissan Motor Co., Ltd., Japan's second-largest automotive company, is headquartered in Yokohama, Japan, and is part of the Renault-Nissan Alliance. Operating with more than 267,000 employees globally, Nissan sold more than 4.9 million vehicles and generated revenue of 9.6 trillion yen (USD 116.16 billion) in fiscal 2012. Nissan delivers a comprehensive range of over 60 models under the Nissan and Infiniti brands. In 2010, Nissan introduced the Nissan LEAF, and continues to lead in zero-emission mobility. The LEAF, the first mass-market, pure-electric vehicle launched globally, is now the best-selling EV in history.

For more information on our products, services and commitment to sustainable mobility, visit our website at http://www.nissan-global.com/EN/.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 25 Comments
      paulwesterberg
      • 1 Year Ago
      Yea shopping malls will probably prefer level 2 or level 1 chargers just to keep people there longer.
      Ryan
      • 1 Year Ago
      They should work on installing Level 2 chargers at national parks and rest stops throughout the country. There were 18 Alternative Fuel Vehicle parking spots at Mammoth Caves National Park, but no chargers when I went there last month... It would be a good trip from TN, but only if you could charge somewhere in Kentucky.
        Spec
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Ryan
        What is the point of Alternative Fuel Vehicle parking spots if there are no chargers?!?!
          Marcopolo
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Spec
          @ Letstakeawalk On my last visit to a park in North America, I observed a party of bemused Asian visitors photographing an Alternative Fuel Vehicle parking spot, occupied by a large and curious Bear. The Bear seemed genuinely interested in the issue of Alternate fuel, but was mildly indignant that the choice didn't meet his requirements. ( I decided to move on before the next thought concerning lunch, occurred to the Bear ! : ) For lovers of the Ursine species, I urge you to support a really worthwhile and impeccably conducted charity, Free the Bears Fund Inc. or just visit the website to read about the terrible plight of these wonderful creatures. [ http://www.freethebears.org.au ] ( Sorry to be a little of topic )
          Letstakeawalk
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Spec
          Mammoth Caves NP uses a lot of natural gas vehicles in its fleet, as well as NEVs. "Mammoth Cave National Park Uses Only Alternative Fuel Vehicles" http://www.afdc.energy.gov/case/83
      aatheus
      • 1 Year Ago
      The problem is, Nissan Corporate has pretty loose control over what the dealers HAVE to do. And how will they punish the dealers when they just start turning the chargers off or blocking them with cars after hours?
      paulwesterberg
      • 1 Year Ago
      This won't help me. 1. I don't bother to pay extra for the SL with CHAdeMO because there are no chargers in my state. 2. There are 2 nissan dealerships in town, but there are already lots of charging stations in town that I also don't use. They are free and must be great for people who live outside of town. Charging at home at night is convenient and covers my daily commuting. 3. There is 1 nissan dealership within leaf driving distance. Unfortunately it is in a direction that I seldom drive and I never do day trips in that direction. 4. Who wants to hang out at a dealership?
        Airton Azevedo
        • 1 Year Ago
        @paulwesterberg
        I have no problem just sitting in my car for 15 min surfing the web on my smart phone while the fast charger pumps in 50 miles into the car.
        Marcopolo
        • 1 Year Ago
        @paulwesterberg
        @ paulwesterberg Hmmm...., it seems you really don't like Nissan and find charging arrangements unsatisfactory. Hey, here's an idea, buy a GM Volt !
      Dave D
      • 1 Year Ago
      Hmmm. I can't quite decide where I come down on this one. It seems like they would be better off picking the 100 largest shopping malls in America and sponsoring each one to have a DC Fast charger???
        Rotation
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Dave D
        Are shopping malls and DCFCs really a good match? They don't want you parking at the charger for 90 minutes while you go in and shop.
        Spec
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Dave D
        It is a lot cheaper to tell your dealers that they have to install a DC fast-charger or else.
      aatheus
      • 1 Year Ago
      Nissan's intentions are good here, but they need to get tighter control over their dealers. For the dealers near me, they either have Blink or Nissan-branded fast chargers. The Nissan-branded ones require an Aerovironment fob that only the dealer has access to. They go home at Xpm, so after that, you cannot fast charge. For Blink, many dealers park cars in front of the chargers to block them after-hours. In the Bay Area this isn't so bad; we're surrounded by fast chargers to choose from. But once you get south of San Jose, there's nothing by L2 until you get to LA!
        Rotation
        • 1 Year Ago
        @aatheus
        There's a set of L2s at the Gilroy outlet mall next to the Tesla Superchargers.
      paulwesterberg
      • 1 Year Ago
      Tesla: We will install superchargers along interstate routes where they will be most useful to our customers. Nissan: We will install superchargers at dealerships where they will be most useful to Nissan.
        Letstakeawalk
        • 1 Year Ago
        @paulwesterberg
        Not that I am a Nissan customer, but the two Nissan dealers in my area are located in very convenient areas, on the way to and from major shopping centers. I could imagine using them, especially if I were heading to one of the more popular waterparks in my area. I can understand that you might not get much personal benefit (esp. since you didn't go for the SL anyway), but there are a lot of people who will benefit from this simple and reasonable installation of EVSEs. No need to be a sour puss about good news - more EVSEs! As for #4 below: Free coffee, free Wi-Fi, cool cars to look at (unless you really just can't stand being around ICEs, I suppose) - and the salesmen know you're just there for a charge. They won't waste a moment on you, so it's free time to yourself, for half an hour or so. More fun than sitting at a Supercharger...
          paulwesterberg
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Letstakeawalk
          Superchargers are often located next to cafes, restaurants or coffee shops.
          paulwesterberg
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Letstakeawalk
          I am glad that there are more fast charger for people who need them, but I feel that by placing them at dealerships they will only be useful to nissan owners which is a shame because I think that having an extensive public charging system(even if you have to pay to use it) would do more to speed ev adoption. I also dislike the closed/proprietary nature of tesla's supercharger network.
        Rotation
        • 1 Year Ago
        @paulwesterberg
        When your cars can drive all day in down on a charge, putting chargers on the edge of town makes sense. When your cars have only about 70 miles range, putting them in town makes sense. I don't like that the chargers shut down at night, but the locations are pretty good.
          Rotation
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Rotation
          BraveLil'Toaster: I think your response is misplaced, because I agree with you. For short range cars like LEAFs, putting them at car dealerships is actually quite good placement.
          BraveLil'Toaster
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Rotation
          What the hell are you talking about? Where *I* live, there's almost as many car dealerships as there are gas stations, right into the downtown core. http://goo.gl/maps/1pw7M
      Dave
      • 1 Year Ago
      Have they come up with a way to charge people for using them yet?
        aatheus
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Dave
        Blink enabled dealerships can already charge people. It's built into the business model. ECOtality just needs to turn on per-session charging. For the Nissan-branded ones, it's probably similar, but only if you issue everyone with an access fob.
      Marcopolo
      • 1 Year Ago
      This is a very positive move by Nissan, and a good sales motivation by Nissan to support it's dealers. Nissan showroom visitors, witnessing a Leaf charging may be tempted to make enquiries about advantages of Leaf ownership. It will also serve to further familiarise Nissan salespeople with Leaf, and the motivation of Leaf owners. A large GM dealership in the UK recently commented that it was difficult to overcome the prejudice against electric vehicles from the general public influencing his sales staff. I was invited to speak to his sales staff in an effort to find a solution for this problem. After doing so, I proposed that each of his employees be supplied with a Vauxhall Ampera as a company car. The dealer was eager to implement this idea, but Opel Europe, quashed the idea, by saying it couldn't supply a sufficient number of cars. (The other reason was GM/Opel didn't want to have to supply staff in GM owned dealerships with Ampera's) It's my belief that the best EV salespeople, are those who drive EV's (or EREV's). Nothing beats experience.
      Rotation
      • 1 Year Ago
      I'm with you aatheus. The biggest problem with the DCFCs at the dealers is the dealers' support for letting people charge is spotty. A charger that you cannot be sure you can use and cannot even check on over the internet as you approach isn't nearly as useful as one you can be more sure of.
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