An evolution in lithium-ion batteries and "interesting advances in electric technology" are said to be responsible for the delay of Infiniti's electric car, the production version of the LE concept first shown at the New York Auto Show in 2012. At the time of its introduction, Infiniti said we'd have a version we could buy within two years; that timeline became 2015, and now Automotive News Europe reports that it's "still within in our mid-term plan" but officials aren't saying how long the delay will be.

When shown, the LE had a 24-kWh lithium-ion battery and a 100-kw electric motor producing 134 horsepower and 240 pound-feet of torque, a 100-mile range and the potential for wireless charging. It isn't clear if the postponement will bring improved specs or perhaps improved packaging and technology - or both. All we have for now is that the new timeframe is "not significantly" beyond the original plan.


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  • 28 Comments
      Dave
      • 1 Year Ago
      I'm sure Nissan is paying attention to how the market reacts to various BEVs. So far, Model S buyers have demonstrated that they wanted more range than the 40 kwh version could provide. That doesn't bode well for a 24 kwh Infiniti.
        m_2012
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Dave
        The 134HP doesnt go well against 400+HP either. 1/3 the power, 1/3 the range - better be less than 1/3 the price. Probably a good move to delay and punt.
        Dave
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Dave
        And, yes, the car is bloody silly looking as well.
        Spec
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Dave
        I think 40KWH would be fine. Tesla just wanted to eliminate a SKU . . . the lowest profit SKU.
      EJD1984
      • 1 Year Ago
      In theory, you could delay a car indefinitely to add better tech.
        archos
        • 1 Year Ago
        @EJD1984
        you just summed up the hydrogen car in one sentence.
      paulwesterberg
      • 1 Year Ago
      They should add some kWh as well.
        Spec
        • 1 Year Ago
        @paulwesterberg
        I think that will be the biggest change made.
      Justin Shaw
      • 1 Year Ago
      Makes sense they went back to the drawing board, the model s looks a lot better. Come on Nissan
      Eta Carinae
      • 1 Year Ago
      I would delay it too......look at it.....with designs such as the model S and the ELR on the road offering a better range and experience......nissan needs alot of work to do...
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
      Spec
      • 1 Year Ago
      Well, duh. Nissan saw that the Infiniti LE would have looked like crap in view of the Tesla Model S. So they very wisely pulled it before launch. The Infiniti LE seemed to be nothing but a fancy luxury car body thrown on top of an unimproved Leaf drivetrain. That may have worked 2 years ago, but that does not fly today when the Model S is available.
        stumpy
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Spec
        probably true... but maybe some people would pay half the price for half the range?
      Dave D
      • 1 Year Ago
      I bet they mostly got caught between battery tech. They were going to stay with the original Leaf batteries for cost reasons but the Model S has made that a non-starter for a luxury car. Plus it's pretentiously, butt-ugly.
      Bernard
      • 1 Year Ago
      I think they should delete the grill. Either way, Tesla is kicking everyone's butts. I'm not sure this delay will help enough. Hopefully it will be under $50k or it will not have a chance.
      Electron
      • 1 Year Ago
      Good for Nissan: no point in launching an aesthetically challenged luxury car with city car range. Not sure why it should take Nissan many more years to do what Tesla can do today though.
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
        Grendal
        • 1 Year Ago
        Liberace's Air Mattress. That's fabulous. That's why I'm glad you're back. Well done. +1. I disagree with your Tesla analysis but agree with your assessment of the Leaf.
        VL00
        • 1 Year Ago
        The weight of a car is a MINOR factor in terms of efficiency. Go back for your GED
          Spec
          • 1 Year Ago
          @VL00
          It doesn't matter much for highway driving. But for start-stop city driving and hills, accelerating all that mass does cost energy. Regen systems help but they are really not that efficient.
      Scooter
      • 1 Year Ago
      The current and blossoming "luxury EV" segment is highly questionable in my opinion. On one hand you get "sort-of-green" with a blend of luxury, on the other you get excessive price tags and lose a lot efficiency when building luxury EV's weighed down with so many standard luxury features. Then of course 100 to 200 miles of driving range is also a negative factor. Considering EV charge stations are much less common, and charging for EV's is quite time consuming. Only Tesla has seemed to tackle that with super chargers, performance and range, although the Model S carries a very hefty price tag. It just seems were getting a lot of either "bare-boned" EVs or "luxury EVs". For me as consumer looking to purchase an EV in the near future, I'm not a fan of these "other worldly" designs associated with EV's. Even the I3 is too outlandish for me. The clear desire for "distinction" by designers is probably what turns buyers off the most. Its why I chose to buy a Honda CR-Z instead of Prius. Its been a trade of "real world styling" for "efficiency". I can't stomach the appearance of the Prius, its very dull and "hybrid-ey". I want, like many, want more efficient options but we don't want to be driving a bulbous, tiny wheeled car. It seems only the $45k + cars can answer the call for style but the price tags just kill savings in the long run, when you could drive a pre-owned Prius for thousands less a year. I guess what I'm saying is there is no real winning, or saving for the middle class when we want something that looks like a real car, and acts like a real car but is also an EV. The Model S is great, but I'm most of luxurious options could be swapped and probably make the car a more affordable $35,000 to $40,000. I'll just have to wait and see what they do in 2015.
        archos
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Scooter
        You want Tesla looks and range with a Volt budget. Guess you'll have to wait a couple years until the cheaper Tesla or cheaper batteries come out.
        Spec
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Scooter
        I wouldn't call the Leaf, Volt, Ford Focus EV, or Fiat 500e 'bare-boned'. They are small cars because that helps extend range. But they do pack in the features. I'd like to have some real bare-boned EVs available that cut the prices real low. I guess the Leaf S qualifies.
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