Volkswagen E-Up!
  • Volkswagen E-Up!
  • Volkswagen E-Up!

  • Volkswagen E-Up!
  • Volkswagen E-Up!

  • Volkswagen E-Up!
  • Volkswagen E-Up!

  • Volkswagen E-Up!
  • Volkswagen E-Up!

  • Volkswagen E-Up!
  • Volkswagen E-Up!

  • Volkswagen E-Up!
  • Volkswagen E-Up!

  • Volkswagen E-Up!
  • Volkswagen E-Up!

The distance between Volkswagen's home country of Germany and Austria's Silvretta Electric Car Rally isn't that far, so the German automaker will use the event to promote its upcoming plug-in vehicles. VW will enter both the E-Up! battery-electric and the XL1 plug-in diesel hybrid concept in the rally, which takes place later this month. In 2011, the A1 e-tron, made by VW's Audi division, won the race.

The E-Up!, which VW showed off in March at VW's Annual Press and Investors Conference, has a single-charge range of almost 100 miles and a top speed of 80 miles per hour thanks in part to an electric motor that delivers 80 horsepower. The car can be fast-charged up to 80 percent capacity in less than a half-hour and will be priced, with the battery, at 26,900 euros ($34,500 US).

The XL1 will be produced in low volumes for leases only in Europe. The car gets the equivalent of about 260 miles per gallon from its somewhat noisy, yet sleek, demeanor. We liked our test drive earlier this year. Check out VW's press release below.
Show full PR text
XL1 and e-up! electrify the Silvretta E-Car Rally
  • Volkswagen proves everyday motoring credentials of XL1 and e-up! even in Alpine terrain
  • e-up! – Volkswagen's first fully electric mass production car – to launch this year
  • Electric family car with energy costs under €3 per 100 kilometres
  • Entry-level e-up! price in Germany from €26,900
Gargellen (Austria)/ Wolfsburg, 05 July 2013 - Volkswagen will be lining up at the start of this year's Silvretta E-Car Rally with two innovative vehicles: one is the XL1, the most efficient production car in the world, which is equipped with a plug-in diesel hybrid engine. The other is the e-up!, the first electric vehicle from Volkswagen to be produced in high volume. Volkswagen is showing in this way that these alternative drive systems are capable of excellent performance on Alpine roads as well.

The new e-up! is taking part in the Silvretta E-Car Rally in the Austrian Montafon region for the first time. With its Alpine route profile, the rally is both a test of reliability and highly demanding, as the challenge is to recover large amounts of the power used on the long uphill climbs through battery regeneration on the subsequent downhill sections.

With a totally electric drive system the e-up! provides an entry point to a new pioneering Volkswagen vehicle concept and with four seats guarantees scope for full utilisation. It is a car for everyday use, with impressively high torque of 210 Nm. Practically silent and with no loss of traction during gearshifts, the e-up! is powered by an electric motor that delivers a maximum output of 60 kW / 82 PS. It thus accelerates from 0 to 100 km/h in 12.4 seconds and achieves a top speed of 130 km/h. With its 18.7 kWh lithium-ion battery it has a reach according to NEDC of up to 160 kilometres. This means impressively low energy costs of less than €3 per 100 kilometres.

The e-up! can be charged with 2.3 kW plugged into any standard 230V socket, with 3.6 kW via a home-installed wall box or with up to 40 kW plugged into a DC fast-charging station via the optional CSS (combined charging system). In the latter case, the battery is 80 per cent charged in under 30 minutes. The power connection point for charging the battery is concealed as usual under the fuel cap. In the ideal scenario the e-up! will be charged using electricity from regenerative sources and will then be running 100% CO2 neutral.

The e-up! differentiates itself from the basic up! model through a high-quality, aerodynamically optimised design.

One striking identifying feature externally is the curved arrangement of the LED daytime running lights in the bumper. The front section, sills and underbody have also been aerodynamically enhanced. Burnished 15-inch alloy wheels with low rolling resistance tyres, Volkswagen emblems on a blue background and e-up! lettering on the hatch and the front doors make the fully electric four-seater instantly unmistakable.

Only a premium level of trim is being offered for the e-up! In addition to the high up! specification it includes 'maps+more' navigation, Climatronic climate control and multi-function display, heated windscreen, heated seats and tinted rear windows.

The mobile online 'Car Net' services, which can be controlled via smartphone, appear in the e-up! for the first time in the New Small Family and also form part of the car's standard specification.

The interior is characterised by light grey seat covers with blue fell seams, a design specific to the e-up! The purposeful use of leather and chrome trim conveys a purist overall impression – in keeping with a fully-fledged, urbane electric car's vehicle concept.

The entry-level price of the e-up! in Germany as an already well-equipped base model inclusive of battery is €26,900. This autumn at the IAA (International Motor Show) in Frankfurt, Volkswagen will announce further details on how the vehicle is to be marketed, including, for example, leasing and flexible car hire packages.


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 18 Comments
      Spec
      • 4 Months Ago
      How about they offer them for sale instead?
        DaveMart
        • 4 Months Ago
        @Spec
        So, do you want to bet they won't? I have previously offered to bet on VWs plans, but everyone who thinks that they know better than VW how to produce cars profitably and when to offer them for sale go quiet. The E-Up is scheduled for the fall in Europe, as they have said for some time.
      Spec
      • 4 Months Ago
      I'm not saying they won't, I'm saying they haven't. The German car companies have really been dragging their feet. And it is a bit ironic, I'd imagine that a lot of their PV system owners would like to have EVs to power up using their PV systems.
      • 4 Months Ago
      This is an interesting event, with all the newly developed electric cars doing the race. However, is it really rally? Or is it just a normal track race? There is something new this year, a new competitor with new EV concept is entering the race, Schaeffler’s wheel hub drive. What's the different is that the Schaeffler car is powered by 2 electric motors installed within the rear rim. It is a good time to compare the performance of the different designs whether a big electric motors or multiple small electric motors is better on the track with the same conditions.
      DaveMart
      • 4 Months Ago
      Spec: Actually I have a rational objection to technologically stupid scams which I have to pay for in part in my electricity bills, and which are perpetrated on the gullible public taking advantage of their innumeracy. You can't take on board the simple fact that the Germans have paid a fortune for solar panels which are not going to power their cars as it is available at the wrong time, and hardly available at all in parts of the winter. The excess cost of this lunacy is that they are paying 18bn Euros for power worth about 3bn Euros: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-23127175 Perhaps you could manage to comprehend that this is not a critique of solar in other places nearer the equator, but simply the fact at northerly locations like Germany or the UK. The subsidised bludgers, the middle classes in Germany, indeed receive their power cheaply, as they get extortionate payoffs for their electricity produced when it is near worthless, and subsidised rates for the power they consume when it is expensive. This not only releases a lot of CO2, but means that the cost of this lunacy to the society at large remains multiples of what it would otherwise be.
      paulwesterberg
      • 4 Months Ago
      Why no 24 Hours Nürburgring?
      Spec
      • 4 Months Ago
      @DaveMart You don't get it. The people with PV systems are generating power that they already paid for so they are not paying 30cents/KWH. And it doesn't matter if they charge at night because these are net-metering systems. I know you have an irrational hatred of solar PV but it works.
      DaveMart
      • 4 Months Ago
      I had a VW Polo which I liked. Other than that I have no commercial interest in them, and currently drive a Hyundai as they offer better value for money. I often like VW's engineering though.
      Marcopolo
      • 4 Months Ago
      @ DaveMart Dave, I'm curious. You are obviously a respected, knowledgeable member of your community, with professional standing. You also display a passion for EV technology, and a very sensible, rational concern about the environment. You devote considerable time and energy to study and analyse the development of EV's in Europe. (Your comments on ABG are often more informative than the articles !). So, my question is, why on earth don't you drive a Leaf, Zoe, or Vauxhall Ampera, or even a non plug-in hybrid like the Prius ? Why a Hyundai ? I've nothing against Hyundai, but apart from being cheap and reliable, they don't really have much to offer someone who wants to assist the adoption of technically advanced transport. Surely, you could negotiate with your employer to provide you with better company car ? I hope my curiosity, is not too personal.
      aatheus
      • 4 Months Ago
      I hope they sell this vehicle in the US at some point. It's about the right size and capability, and it has fast charge!
      DarylMc
      • 4 Months Ago
      Hi DaveMart You sound like a VW salesman:) Actually I really like the UP. Simple, not busy interior. I would be interested to purchase. (having said that what's happened to goodoldgorr) I sat in a regular one and it offers easy access and very good space for the front passengers. It's small and light which I think would be good for an EV. Have heard it is not planned to bring to Australia. Pity
      Marcopolo
      • 4 Months Ago
      @ Spec, Shouting doesn't help the validity of your beliefs ! The criticism of the " German experiment" is valid. Most of Germany's Solar and Wind generated power is wasted due to the unreliable nature of it's generation timing. The result of decommissioning Nuclear Power generation, has resulted in increased coal-fired generation and purchasing nuclear generated power from France and the Czech Republic. You shouldn't just pretend that because you like a technology for ideological reasons, it works ! (Well you can, but you shouldn't expect your fellow taxpayer to fund your delusions)
      brotherkenny4
      • 4 Months Ago
      Gasoline is 9 bucks a gallon (2.05/liter) in germany. The savings over fossil fuels is proprtionally similar to the US and about double on a magnitude basis. Basically it's $3 e-equivolent and $9 gasoline for a whopping $6 savings. In the US we only save about $2.5. So, actually there is more of a natural market driver in germany from the consumption side, and thus subsidized purchases may be less necessary. I suspect the Germans are just conservative and slow on everything. Yes, I know, conservative and slow is slightly redundant
    • Load More Comments