TVR has come back from the dead after being on ice since 2006 when the company's then-owner, Russian billionaire Nikolai Smolensky, couldn't find a buyer for this characterful British carmaker. Smolensky had resisted bidders for a long time, but a group of investors led by Les Edgar recently made him a worthwhile offer for an undisclosed sum, and he's now reportedly a supporter of the brand's return. Edgar is part of a three-man executive board that will pilot the TVR brand back into the marketplace by 2015, starting with a lineup of two new cars that he recently talked about with Autocar.

The new models will stick to TVR tradition by retaining a front-engine, rear-wheel-drive layout. Edgar described the first new model to Autocar as "a secondhand Aston," also noting that the new company will build cars that are as mechanically simple and free of electronic nannies as possible, keeping them in character with what TVR was building when it went under. That means cars that Edgar likes to call "supercars for the common man," with pricing that ranges from £50k to £80k. Edgar says the question of whether TVR will continue its tradition of developing and building its own engines is undecided, but doesn't think sourcing an engine from another manufacturer would compromise the cars' character. As for what the new models might be called, the new owner says he and his team may use existing names from the TVR fold, but they would still like to build all-new cars rather than merely update the old ones.

When Edgar and his team bought TVR, they received the company's name, design rights and assets, the latter of which includes Blackpool Engineering, a company set up by Smolensky that, among other things, contains a store of jigs, molds and spare parts for existing models. Edgar hopes to sell those parts and the company's service expertise to owners of existing TVR models. Once the business of selling cars, parts and service is up and running, he says breaking even could be a minimum of three years away, and if that all goes well, a return to Le Mans racing could be possible, as well.


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  • 23 Comments
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
      ryanandrewmartin
      • 1 Year Ago
      I'll believe it when I see it. It'd be great though. I've always been a fan.
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
      Bernard
      • 1 Year Ago
      The engines were the best part, if they want to out source anything it should be the suspension, interior, and chassis development.
      aatbloke1967
      • 1 Year Ago
      Fantastic news. Hopefully they'll be able to combine the characteristics which made the previous cars their desirability and notoriety, whilst simultaneously main ring the prerequisite levels of investment this marque deserves.
      domingorobusto
      • 1 Year Ago
      Are they coming to America? If not, then I'd rather they didn't come back, so there's less things out there that I want but can't have. It's torture that I can't buy a Sagaris, I don't need any more unattainables haunting my dreams.
      RGT881
      • 1 Year Ago
      So it'll be a British Dodge Viper from 1995? I certainly applaud TVR's return, but today's buyers in all segments are becoming increasingly sophisticated. They demand sound deadening, supple suspension, good driving position, excellent ergonomics (packaging). In other words, the car must be entertaining, but it should also be fine for long distance commutes and not wear someone out after an hour.
        Shiftright
        • 1 Year Ago
        @RGT881
        TVR was making TVRs way before Dodge was making Vipers
        Glen Aldridge
        • 7 Days Ago
        @RGT881

        Since Caterhams & it's many clones are still selling quite well I would disagree with your observations of todays drivers requirements. In fact the less crap they stick in my car, the better I'll like it.

        • 1 Year Ago
        @RGT881
        [blocked]
          RGT881
          • 1 Year Ago
          If it was so good then how come few very people bought one? I know the issues with reliability, but it isn't just that. Lotus has good quality and yet their cars aren't selling that well either next to well sorted out competitors such as the Cayman.
          • 1 Year Ago
          [blocked]
          aatbloke1967
          • 1 Year Ago
          Carguy, TVRs were sold across Europe, and in Japan, Australasia, South Africa, Hong Kong and the Middle East.
        aatbloke1967
        • 1 Year Ago
        @RGT881
        RGT, people buy TVRs for the same reason they buy Nobles. Not because they're conceived in a clinical laboratory in Stuttgart. But because they're developed by a few enthusiastic blokes in little more than a shed who understand the very ethos of what a traditional powerful, British sports car should be. And that's the beauty of a diverse motor industry and an equally diverse market. People who buy these cars aren't cross-shopping appliances at a strip mall. They're buying a slice of automotive cultural identity which they believe personifies them.
          RGT881
          • 1 Year Ago
          @aatbloke1967
          But is that enough to stay in the black rather than the red? Don't get me wrong, I understand the premise behind TVR, Lotus, Noble and such, but I believe there has got to be innovation and some effort for refinement. Remember the BMW Z4M? That thing was a maniac, built by a big company, or how about current MB SLS which is hilarious? Yet both of those cars were refined to be comfortable as daily drivers. Also, the British sports car concept...well I appreciate it, but they're all dead...and Aston Martin almost went that way too if it wasn't for an 11th hour deal.
          aatbloke1967
          • 1 Year Ago
          @aatbloke1967
          They're not "all dead" and while cottage industry production is a difficult business to excel at profitably, the bottom line is there simply isnt the capital to produce a Porsche clone, and even if there was the traditional customers would only be alienated. The only players in this market come from a select few European countries. If you dont understand the narket or the heritage, the only questions being asked will be yours RGT.
        dearest rat
        • 1 Year Ago
        @RGT881
        I'd say Morgan is a prime example of this, though it occupies a different niche than TVR.
      Scooter
      • 1 Year Ago
      Only experience I had in a TVR was in Gran Turismo, basically un-drive-able in a race setting, unless you want to mow some grass with your car.
        Shiftright
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Scooter
        Yup, driving a car in a video game is exactly like driving one in real life. Just like kissing a woman, eating a steak and sky diving
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Scooter
        [blocked]
      sinistro79
      • 1 Year Ago
      If there is one thing that you can't do with any success it's sell a car with only two models in it's line-up. Just go ask Fiat's Alfa Romeo brand.
        Shiftright
        • 1 Year Ago
        @sinistro79
        Alfa currently has a 4 car range: Mito, Giulietta, 159 and 4C.
      artandcolour2010
      • 1 Year Ago
      Apparently they're hope for Hudson yet!
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