The European Union (EU) is putting off its vote on stricter emissions standards for the continent, and Ford's none too happy about it.

The US automaker, which has been broadening its line-up of hybrids and plug-ins during the past few years, is on record as being "disappointed" that the EU is delaying its vote, Automotive News Europe reports. The EU was set to put in place a mandate for fleetwide new-car emissions to drop to 95 grams per kilometer of CO2 (down from about 132 grams now) by the end of the decade. The 2020 standards correlate to a fuel economy level of about 59 miles per gallon, on the European cycle.

"This is also about employment" - German Chancellor Angela Merkel

The German government has being lobbying against the new standards, saying that they will cause far more damage to a German car industry – with luxury brands like Mercedes-Benz and BMW – than to smaller-car companies like Fiat and Renault. BMW Chairman Norbert Reithofer said in May that the 2020 mandate is almost impossible to reach without a major investment in drivetrain technology from the European governments.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel told Automotive News Europe that she supported the delay because jobs are more important than improving fuel economy. "This is also about employment," she said. "At a time when we're spending days sitting here talking about employment, we have to take care that, notwithstanding the need to make progress on environmental protection, we don't weaken our own industrial base."


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 9 Comments
      CoolWaters
      • 1 Year Ago
      The jobs have moved to the solar and wind industries.
      Smoking_dude
      • 1 Year Ago
      "This is also about employment." Well there will be the time when, the competitors are too far ahead. Just look how Fords new PHEVs fly of the shelves. And sadly Ford does not offer them in Germany. Even without subsidies, this would be a signal to the consumer. Look how many Batteries Panasonic makes for Tesla and Toyota In future it will create jobs. But there are lots of companies that have no plan about their future. No more Kolben-Mahle (Piston Mahle) Big problems for ZF. no more 8, 9 or 10 speed transmissions, no sparkplugs (Bosch). there is a interesting and painful german documentary. Die leise Revolution - Zukunft Elektroauto = The silent revolution - future: electric cars http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-8-VSi7uYKo It shows that lots of businesses are clueless and will have bit problems. Oh and it is nicely made, pistons and rods beeing dumped on the waste, because EVs don't need them.
        Smoking_dude
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Smoking_dude
        and as I write this there are 20 gigawatts solar and 5 gigawatts wind power on the german grid. waiting to replenish an empty battery...
        Spec
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Smoking_dude
        Well, I wouldn't say that the Ford PHEVs are 'flying off the shelves" but they are selling and it is a growth market. They hybrids are the big sellers right now but as gas prices rise the proportion of PHEVs will grow.
      EZEE
      • 1 Year Ago
      I read a couple of articles - how about this: German automakers complain that tougher CO2 limits favor French automakers Renault, PSA/Peugeot-Citroen and Italy's Fiat that mainly sell smaller cars with low emissions. So....they are complaining about automakers that sell smaller cars with low emission.... Somehow I think that is going to go over like a lead balloon in this room...
      Spec
      • 1 Year Ago
      Ford got $5.9Billion in government loans to develop their energy efficient cars. They are eager to sell their C-Max and Fusion hybrids and plug-in hybrids I guess. The Germans have been running a counter-productive foot-dragging campaign. There is going to be a move to more electrified cars whether they like it or not. At least BMW has been working on EVs & PHEVs. Benz has done some work but they don't seem as ready. You can't save jobs by sticking your head in the sand . . . people will just buy products from others. The American car companies learned this that hard way.
        EZEE
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Spec
        I think the issue is more from the side of the mandate, which might not be a mandate. Imagine if the government told you, "By this year, you will have to do XX." So reacting to this, you change your business model around that fact, and loans or no loans, you modify your ways of doing things as a result of the 'perceived' mandate. Then one day, you hear, "Oh Hai - we might push that back a few years. Kthxbai" Other automakers, who did not react and did not have the outlays (and are building higher profit, larger cars), continue to do just that. Your response would be, "WTF people?" I can't blame Ford for being a bit pissy about it.
      Ryan
      • 1 Year Ago
      More like corporate profits for the top 2% are more important than the environment. There are plenty of 'jobs' in redesigning the cars to meet the better standards. And even then, I think the environment is more important than 'jobs' that damage the environment.
      Reggie
      • 1 Year Ago
      "The German government has being lobbying against the new standards, saying that they will cause far more damage to a German car industry" LOL Fiesta, Focus & Ecoboost and other engines production are "Made in Gemany", Ford Design Centre is in Germany. Clobber poor ole Ford of Germany instead? Shame on you Merkel!!