The German auto industry has been long lauded for its vehicles' achievements in speed. The German government is now saying the European Union's 2020 emissions mandate is coming up a little too quick for its liking.

Germany is lobbying EU officials to give some leeway to automakers such as Porsche, BMW and Mercedes-Benz, who all have vehicles known far more for sportiness than fuel efficiency. This comes from Reuters, which cites people familiar with the process that it didn't identify. The German government is proposing so-called "multiplier" credits, which are essentially extra credits for each low-emissions vehicle that the automakers produces that would offset the effect of the sportier, thirstier vehicles.

As it is, Germany's fleetwide carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions are about 11 percent higher than Europe's as a whole and about 55 percent more than the fleetwide average of 95 grams of CO2 per kilometer mandated for 2020 by the EU. European countries will save as much save as much as 83 billion euros ($109 billion) worth of fuel annually by 2030 because of the mandate, Reuters says, citing consultants Ricardo-AEA and Cambridge Econometrics.

German automakers have made their own news in regards to stricter emissions limits. BMW Chairman Norbert Reithofer last month said the 2020 EU limits are nearly "impossible" to meet without substantial additional investment in drivetrain technology. Meanwhile, Volkswagen had for a couple of years been accused of by Greenpeace of overstating the environmental benefits of some of its vehicles before getting back in Greenpeace's good graces earlier this year by pledging to meet the EU's 2020 emissions standards.


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  • 35 Comments
      Spec
      • 2 Years Ago
      How about "NO!". C'mon Germany. Sticking only to ICE will make you a dinosaur. Tesla has shown that EVs can make money. Now apply some of that German engineering to EVs. Build a great V2G system and get Merkel to get everyone using it. A zillion EVs plugged in will do wonders with your Solar and Wind heavy grid.
        EZEE
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Spec
        I always hear about 'german engineering' - however, my sister owned a Mercedes - junk. Friends have owned VW's - not a single one has lasted the way my 2000 Ford Ranger ULEV FFV has. I am not impressed with German Engineering. And not that Americans or Japanese have been lightning quick with advances, but we have Toyota and Ford that lead the way with hybrids, GM with the Voltec drive, Tesla with...well... Tesla, Nissan with the Leaf. Except for 'clean' diesel, what have the Germans done for us lately? Now - I would like to see the Voltec drive offered in many other vehicles - maybe Gen II will be, and had hoped Ford would have done more than jerking off when they came out with the Focus EV (aww jeez it's all over the car!), but I still see 'effort.' The Germans, however...I can see being late to the party, but with rare exception, they haven't even gotten dressed to go to the party yet. I can see if a company was skeptical when toyota and ford first came out with their persepective hybrids - but that was what...1997 or so for the Toyota, and early 2000's for the Ford...but its 'only' now 16 years later if looking at the Toyota...
      DaveMart
      • 2 Years Ago
      It is worth considering why some of the German manufacturers are the ones asking for this. It is because the limits are effectively much tougher for them than for others. Merc, BMW and Porsche make some of the biggest, heaviest, and fastest cars in Europe. Makers like Fiat, Renault and VW with a broader range and proportionately much more of their fleet being small, not so fast cars have life a lot easier - and that is aside from Renault's drive for BEV cars. It is not all one sided though, as the higher price point for their cars means that it is much easier for them to use sophisticated engineering to reduce fuel consumption, as Audi do with their aluminium construction. I don't think we should grant them an exemption, but keep the pressure on to force them to pioneer more frugal cars in spite of their speed and size, but I can see why they are trying to get a bit of a pass! :-)
      Reggie
      • 2 Years Ago
      Daily Mail news latest says we will all be gonna's in a billion years time according to scientists..... The end of the world is (almost) nigh: Scientists predict that all life will be wiped off our planet in less than a billion years Astrobiologist Jack O'Malley-James says the sun will get hotter and hotter causing greater evaporation which will reduce carbon dioxide levels This will mean there is eventually too little CO2 for plants to survive When they die out, herbivores will also die out, followed by carnivores Microbes will then be all that remains until another billion years later when the seas will also dry out meaning very little life will remain. All animals and plants will vanish from the Earth within the next billion years, a new study suggests. Ironically Armageddon is going to arrive as a result of too little, rather than too much, carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Currently experts are trying to find ways to cut levels of the greenhouse gas to prevent global warming running out of control. But as the Sun ages and grows hotter, greater evaporation and chemical reactions with rainwater will take away more and more carbon dioxide. In less than a billion years, its levels will be too low for photosynthesising plants to survive, say scientists. When that happens, life as we know it on Earth will cease to exist. Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2352717/The-end-world-nigh-Scientists-predict-life-wiped-planet-billion-years.html#ixzz2XtLG5vnM Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook MMMmm buy a 7 Series and "save the planet", will be on Autoblog Green one day in a billion years time?
      raktmn
      • 2 Years Ago
      "Hey, we're 7 years away from our goal, shouldn't we be working hard towards meeting that goal?" "Nah, fvck it, let's give up now" German automaker's version of leadership: Give up now, while everyone else is actually doing the hard work.
        EZEE
        • 2 Years Ago
        @raktmn
        It does seem odd. If Ford can get 47 mpg (yes, I know, disputed, but on the euro cycle that would be like 9 billion mpg) in a fusion, plus of course Chevy with the volt...you would think we would see a little more from Germany. Nothing wrong with saying, 'whoops, late to the game' but at least then make an effort.
      DarylMc
      • 2 Years Ago
      I don't understand all the implications of the stats but from that article I calculate Germany's current fleet is running at 150g/km which converts to 40MPG US. If that is the case it is quite impressive compared to my own country Australia. So impressive I wonder if it is correct.
        Marcopolo
        • 2 Years Ago
        @DarylMc
        @ DarylMc It's because the Australian statistic's reflect a much higher proportion larger engined gasoline vehicles and heavy transport. The European figures calculate diesel powered vehicles differently form Australia or the US. (There's also the difference between the old Imperial gallon, and the US gallon.) I've just arrived back in Melbourne to witness the ' high farce' , of Australian federal politics ! ( although, since I live in the electorate of Higgins, nothing will change for me locally ). It's sad to witness the Australian Labour Party, dumping it's leader, and the nations elected Prime Minister, who although an unpopular politician, tenaciously upheld some principles ( albeit some wrong principles) in preference for a leader with no principles of any sort, except those of political expediency and self -interest !
          DarylMc
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Marcopolo
          Hi Marcopolo I'm just glad we are only paying 2 prime minister pensions out of this and not 3.
          Marcopolo
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Marcopolo
          @ DarylMc Interesting point. It only happened once before, and that was before parliamentary pensions. ( Sir Robert Menzies) . I wonder how it's calculated ?
          Marcopolo
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Marcopolo
          @ DarylMc Sorry no edit ! 19th century, should read early 20th !
          DarylMc
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Marcopolo
          Hi Marcopolo It seems there has been quite a few prime ministers deposed. Bob Hawke was also one of the fairly recent. http://australianpolitics.com/lists/prime-ministers-since-1901
          Marcopolo
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Marcopolo
          @ DarylMc Oh yes, it's part of the Westminster system. However, apart from Andrew Fisher and Alfred Deakin in the 19th century, there have only been two instances of a deposed Prime Minister being reinstated to the post. Sir Robert Menzies who was prime minister, (1939-1941) and (1949-1966), and now Kevin Rudd.
        Giza Plateau
        • 2 Years Ago
        @DarylMc
        We don't drive moronic F150s or Suburbans in Europe. We don't have that sick spirit like USA does.
          jkirkebo
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Giza Plateau
          The diesels are worse emission wize. 125g/km for all petrol passenger cars sold in Norway in May and 134g/km for all diesel cars. Total average is 127g/km even though diesel has a 55% market share, since the EVs draw the average down some.
          EZEE
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Giza Plateau
          You have 'clean' diesel! :-) The USA is a study in ndividualism and extremes. Yes, there are a lot of f-1-fiddys, it there are also Tesla's, volts, plug ins... How many hybrids does Ford produce vs. all of Europe combined? Ditto Toyota? Europe seems great with the old and existing...but what about innovation? Yep...clean diesel.... Clean. Btw - the one they have - that VW with the hyper high mileage - what are your thoughts on that?
        Rotation
        • 2 Years Ago
        @DarylMc
        150g/km is approximately equal to 28mpg (combined) in US gallons on the EPA measurement system. That means their fleet average in Europe is better than EVERY gasoline (non-hybrid) they offer in the US, exceeding even the fuel economy of the C250! It makes their average approximately equal to a US Accord 4-banger w/manual transmission. I'm trying to find a car that is sold in more of the world that gets the same combined fuel economy. But I can't find one, it's better than the BMW 328i, for example. Maybe about the same as a BMW MINI Cooper S Clubman? (1.6L supercharged).
          jkirkebo
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Rotation
          For comparison all passenger cars sold in Norway in May had an average of 127g/km. It is actually the diesel cars that draws the average up, for petrol cars the average is 125g/km in May.
          DarylMc
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Rotation
          Hi Rotation I knew I made a mistake there since the calculator I used was for diesel. Was waiting for someone to correct me. I don't know the accuracy of this calculator but it suggests 36MPG US http://www.unitjuggler.com/convert-fuelconsumption-from-gperkmgasoline-to-mpg.html Too high?
          DarylMc
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Rotation
          Hi Rotation. Now I'm really confused. It's a complex system so I hope it actually meets the environmental goals.
          Rotation
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Rotation
          DarylMc: There's not really a direct conversion of this sort, because it depends on the testing methodology. So when you do a conversion, you not only have to take into account the gallon size, but which testing regimen you are trying to convert to (really approximate). The EU system is much more optimistic, it produces higher mpg figures for the same car than the US EPA system does, even when both are expressed in US gallons. Yours uses 1 g/km CO2 = 5457 mpg. This is about right for the EU testing. For example, a Prius is rated at 89g/km and 72.4mpg combined. Now those are Imperial gallons, so that's 60mpg in US gallons. Your conversion system would suggest it would do 5457/89 or 61mpg. So yours is about right for EU mpg expressed in US gallons. But I wanted a figure for EPA mpg in US gallons. The Prius (the same car) is rated on the EPA system at 50mpg (US gallons), or about 18% lower. My conversion uses 1g/co2 = 4200mpg (for gas cars), that produces 47mpg US for the Prius. So while yours is higher, it's not necessarily more wrong, it may be more right, if what you're thinking of comparing to is the EU system. I usually post US EPA figures because that's what I am used to comparing to and because many others on here are too.
      Electron
      • 2 Years Ago
      There is a really easy fix for this problem: an 85MPH speed limit on all the autobahns rather than the current no speed limit system. Without the theoretical possibility of actually using very high top speeds the demand for it should be much lower and the German car industry could shift its focus away from performance. Should also help the adoption of EVs in Germany since for EVs speed definitely is the enemy of range.
        mylexicon
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Electron
        Cuz speed limits curb demand for overpowered vehicles in other countries? That's a great way to ruin the autobahn, German sports car manufacturers, and Germany's automotive heritage, while accomplishing nothing substantial for the planet.
          jkirkebo
          • 2 Years Ago
          @mylexicon
          Yeah, 85mph is way too high to have any significant impact emission wize. 70mph would be much better.
      EVdriver
      • 2 Years Ago
      Here we go again. Obsolete german automakers try to undermine stricter emission limits AGAIN. They're always doing this. Stop buying obsolete german POS cars, especially the highly carcinogenic so called "clean" diesel ones! If you don't buy german products they can't pollute the air. Win-Win! ;)
        markkiernan
        • 2 Years Ago
        @EVdriver
        Reminds me of the auto dealers in the US trying to block Tesla aka progress.
      transpower
      • 2 Years Ago
      Who the heck cares about CO2 emissions? Is the EU nuts? I do, however, care about fuel economy, and the forthcoming hybrid plug-ins from the German car makers look to be excellent.
        EZEE
        • 2 Years Ago
        @transpower
        Well, whether you agree with global warming or not, many people do, and do 'care' about CO2 emissions. You may not, but to ask, 'who cares?' Well, millions, if not billions, do.
      EZEE
      • 2 Years Ago
      Good point. I would then reference consumer reports. They usually have the Japanese far above the Europeans when it comes to reliability. Far above the Americans too, but that gap has closed, in many cases. American engineering has produced the various hybrids, Voltec, and tesla. Everything from mild hybrids (eassist), to full on (ford) to plug in (ford), to Voltec (volt) to full EV (tesla). The Japanese have all that, except Voltec. Te Europeans have 'clean' diesel.
      dewd7
      • 2 Years Ago
      More signs of big trouble here. Buyers have fine offerings from Cadillac and Tesla, many more. Give me an "F". Quality survey results, economy, and US mood all just say No. What does a BMW mean, beyond legacy associations with gross consumption 80's yuppies? GM is born again, and The Tesla, new and shiny, very fast don't even think about it green. Meanwhile, Korea's gets new milkshakes. On the market now, with your plan for 2015.
      Giza Plateau
      • 2 Years Ago
      Same old lies from the weasels. Car makers have been whining for decades that it was impossible to live up to regulations. They fought against seat belts, they fought against collapsible steering columns and they have fought against mileage even though again and again they were easily able to comply and then some. The 2020 targets are also very easy. Might I recommend low weight, good aerodynamics and electric drive.
      Spec
      • 2 Years Ago
      You are making me disappointed with American engineering. A sample size of one is not going to provide you good data to draw conclusions from.
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