After working with Coritech Services on a bi-directional DC fast charging solution, Boulder Electric Vehicle says it's now the first-ever electric truckmaker to successfully implement Vehicle-to-Grid (V2G) charging. The two companies displayed an electric flatbed utility truck equipped with a Tesla-sized 72-kWh lithium battery pack and a Coritech 60-kW DC fast charger at the Alternative Clean Transportation Expo in Washington, DC this week.

There's a lot of power being produced in V2G charging – their current demonstrations are seeing charger rates of 150 amps during charge or discharge on the 360-volt nominal battery pack. A bi-directional V2G fast charge happens when the electric current can be used for two functions – charging the EV's battery and discharging the power for use outside of the vehicle – by a utility that needs more electricity, for example.

In its press release (see below), Boulder EV says that V2G is a key application of smart grid technologies that helps realize the economic value of mass deployment of EVs. V2G can manage the power stored in the battery between the utility, vehicle and charge points. Southwest Research Institute will be supplying the grid aggregation service between the Coritech's EV supply equipment and the grid. Boulder EV and Coritech are working toward a demonstration in late summer 2013 at the Fort Carson US Army installation near Colorado Spring, CO. Boulder EV thinks the demonstration can work within the Department of Defense's larger vision of a mass scale EV deployment.
Boulder Electric Vehicle and Coritech Services Demonstrate Vehicle-to-Grid (V2G) Charging for the 1st Time Ever with 100% Electric Truck

Boulder Electric Vehicle and Coritech Services have demonstrated bi-directional DC fast charging, making Boulder Electric Vehicle the 1st electric truck company ever to successfully implement Vehicle-to-Grid (V2G) charging.

Lafayette, Colorado (PRWEB) June 25, 2013

Boulder Electric Vehicle and Coritech Services have demonstrated bi-directional DC fast charging, making Boulder Electric Vehicle the 1st electric truck company ever to successfully implement Vehicle-to-Grid (V2G) charging. Boulder EV and Coritech Services will both be attending the Alternative Clean Transportation ("ACT") Expo in Washington DC, June 24th through June 27th, where together in booth 216 they will be highlighting their outstanding achievement of electric vehicle bi-directional charging. There will be on-site demonstrations revealing their turnkey solution to V2G charging utilizing Boulder EV's 100% Electric Flatbed Utility Truck equipped with a Lithium 72 kWh battery pack and a Coritech 60kW DC Fast Charger System. Current demonstrations are seeing charger rates of 150 amps during charge or discharge on the 360V nominal battery pack.

"The ACT Expo is the perfect forum of industry leaders to introduce Boulder Electric Vehicle's proven V2G solution with Coritech Services," shared Carter Brown, Chief Executive Officer of Boulder Electric Vehicle. "We recognize the future importance of V2G in strengthening the value proposition of the Electric Vehicle, and we now offer a turnkey solution that is ready for immediate deployment."

V2G is one of the key applications of smart grid technologies which will help realize the economic value of mass deployment of Electric Vehicles. Communication and management between the utility, vehicle and charge points are essential aspects in achieving V2G. Boulder Electric Vehicle offers a wide range of medium and heavy duty fully electric vehicles ideally suited for today's progressive fleet. Coritech Services offers DC Fast Chargers capable of bi-directional charging and discharging.

"We are proud to provide system solutions today for the realization of V2G DC Fast Charging and to be working with Boulder Electric Vehicle to ensure the entire system works together flawlessly," shared Russ Ristau of Coritech Services Inc.

The system developed has been based on the interface specification for the SPIDERS Phase II program and was implemented, developed and finalized independently by Boulder Electric Vehicle and Coritech Services. Southwest Research Institute will be supplying the grid aggregation service between the Coritech EVSE and the grid. Due to the success of this turnkey system, the companies are working toward a demonstration late summer 2013 at Fort Carson. This demonstrated solution supports a larger vision of the Department of Defense in the mass scale deployment of Electric Vehicles.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 11 Comments
      purrpullberra
      • 2 Years Ago
      I get it. And I don't. Why aren't there more batteries on it? And why is it a flatbed truck? Is it making deliveries of electricity and furniture? DoD, say no more, sure, but couldn't it be a bit more ovoid? I like the technology though. Natural disaster truck right? Boil water, run oxygen concentrators, charge cell phones. And it will do a bit more work than hooking up a Leaf to the house. Not the sexiest technology is it?
      Marcopolo
      • 2 Years Ago
      Interesting technology, although like many such theoretically beneficial technologies, in practice, it may prove overly complicated for little practical benefit.
      • 2 Years Ago
      Electric car and vehicles have low emissions and can become integral parts of a smart grid, where they do not just consume power, but also provide mobile storage of energy acquired during periods of high electricity generation from renewable sources, high winds or sunshine. In times of high demand, they can feed electricity back into the grid. http://www.usa.siemens.com/electromobility/electromobility.html
      paulwesterberg
      • 2 Years Ago
      What I want is a car that can power my house enough to get me though a short power outage and can provide onsite power for mobile applications(plug in your high powered 110v tools - air compressor whatever).
        DaveMart
        • 2 Years Ago
        @paulwesterberg
        The Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV is scheduled for the States in 2014 and can do what you specify.
      Ryan
      • 2 Years Ago
      Unless the grid consists of my house and my house only, I don't think I or many others will go along with it. I understand the concept and it is an interesting one.. but only if you can take your house off the grid using solar, wind, and the EV batteries. But in practice, I'm not sure it would work so well. And our efforts should be geared towards building more inexpensive EVs and more of them first and foremost. The other stuff can come later.
        GoodCheer
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ryan
        Most proposed implementations of this deliver about half of the market price of the grid services 'sold', to the vehicle owner. With a 60 kW connection this would be (very roughly, depending on region and market) about $2 each hour that you're providing service. If you're plugged in 10 hours a day on average, this adds up to a significant fraction of your car payment.
          GoodCheer
          • 2 Years Ago
          @GoodCheer
          Oops, sorry, about $1 per hour. $2 would be (roughly) the market value of 60 kW-hour of frequency regulation service.
        paulwesterberg
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ryan
        Also it would be pretty awesome to switch your household to time of day electricity metering and then get all of your electricity at only 7 cents per kWh.
          paulwesterberg
          • 2 Years Ago
          @paulwesterberg
          On a side note... while this might cut your utility bills in half it would also help utilities because they would see less peak demand during the day.
      dewd7
      • 2 Years Ago
      Battery deployment, simplified? Trailers, existing flatbeds, loaded from the side by standard lift trucks. Ramp trailer gets vehicles up high enough for install. This unit must be developed, perhaps from car carriers? Operation from any parking lot is possible, with no infrastructure. Connection to grid would be from central distribution spots, with the added benefit of fewer, safely isolated charging areas. The battery carriers can also double as feeders for the distro folks.