For 2013, the Pikes Peak International Hill Climb has has added a fourth practice day, part of an effort to give each of the competitors extra practice running up the mountain. That day is today, and it saw the cars running on the bottom-half of the course, while the two-wheelers ran up top.

The extra practice day was not without drama. As we mentioned earlier, the Lovefab Enviate Acura NSX of Cody Loveland endured a huge crash due to a faulty part and is likely done for the week. In the Unlimited class, the Forge Motorsports Ford RS200 driven by Pat Doran also had a big off, but his racecar might live to see raceday this weekend.

World Rally Championship maestro Sébastien Loeb showed why he's the master of perilous ascents, tallying today's quickest section time with a 3:30.768 in his Peugeot 208 T16. Loeb's time buried that of current champ Rhys Millen, who rang up 3:54.835 in his Hyundai Genesis Coupe Unlimited racer. Veteran hillclimber Paul Dallenbach chipped in with the quickest Time Attack session at 4:16.113. (For further timing and results information, click here.)

In the burgeoning Electric class, Nobuhiro "Monster" Tajima has returned with his Monster Sport E-Runner for a second try after mechanical failure ended his race last year. He's got a ways to go, though, as he only ran the fourth-quickest time in the class, 4:16.562. Top time today for the Electric class went to Dakar rally winner Hiroshi Masuoka in his Mitsubishi MiEV Evolution II.

Wednesday will see more practice sessions and the start of qualifying, which will carry on throughout the week. The run for the record books in Colorado officially gets underway on Sunday at 8:00 am MDT.


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  • 14 Comments
      abrlcklnthewall
      • 1 Year Ago
      Supercar, prototype, muscle car, supercar, muscle car, heavily modified car, heavily modified car, HONDA ODYSSEY??? Who the hell let them on there?
        NamorF-Pro
        • 1 Year Ago
        @abrlcklnthewall
        Cuz they can!
        • 1 Year Ago
        @abrlcklnthewall
        [blocked]
      pH
      • 1 Year Ago
      Nobu's been there, done that - he's the Monster, period. Now that it's all paved - completely different race, so I look forward to seeing the new leaders. But for all these "johnny-come-lately" types who've now joined the series but wouldn't dare enter while it was a mixed-course, you're all a bunch of *******. You're only on the course because it's "safer"....
        Ferrari333SP
        • 1 Year Ago
        @pH
        You mean the new people on the course are there because it's faster, therefore can enter crazier machinery, right?
        erjhe
        • 1 Year Ago
        @pH
        I'm not sure I would say it is safer now that it is all asphalt. When racing on asphalt, you have to find the limit of traction and stay just below it. If you step over that limit, you'll suddenly find a greatly reduced amount of traction available and will loose control of the car. This is especially true with racing cars where the difference between traction and no traction is much much harsher. This isn't like sliding your street car through an intersection, when a race car loses traction it will bite back, and do so ferociously. In engineering speak, the kinetic friction (sliding) is much less than the static friction (holding traction). On dirt your difference between holding traction and loosing traction is much less severe than asphalt and is easily predictable, often resulting in drivers letting the car slide and controlling it in the kinetic friction zone. Losing control of the car is actually somewhat harder as the car is more predictable and slower to react; the speeds and forces are lower than when racing on asphalt. Racing on asphalt results in much higher speeds and higher forces. The car reacts quicker which means it both responds to your inputs faster and it also responds quicker to the physics of the car. How often do you see top tier racing drivers get into a slide and the car hooks and snaps the other direction before they can correct this? This unfortunate event happened to a driver in the recent LeMans and claimed his life when his car was sent into the wall. Asphalt is safer only if you're not flirting with the limit or you're tooling around on the street (although that is arguable). Do not make the mistake of comparing your street car to full blown racing cars, they behave nothing alike at the limit. Is Pikes Peak a different game now that it is all asphalt? Yes, definitely. It demands a different prep for the cars that demands a different driving style. Cars that formerly made a compromise between dirt and asphalt setup can now be set specifically for asphalt which is going to make them much much faster than we've seen before. This is evident by some of the totally different car chassis seen this year. Can we compare times with the full asphalt course to those in the past and make comparisons between drivers? No, not really. Even when comparing the asphalt sections that have been pre-existing for some time, you're going to find drivers going much faster now. It's still Pikes Peak, but it's a totally different ball game.
      Bryan Lund
      • 1 Year Ago
      Not surprised the best time turned in today was from the Mitsubishi MiEV Evolution II. The automaker dumb Americans love to put down because they're actually the ignorant ones once again comes through in the clutch. Oh well, your loss and our gain. Oh, and Mitsubishi is not leaving the U.S. car market. Quit trying ta figure that one out for us - not gonna happen. No going out of business sale going on here. Mitsubishi is strong, robust and still selling the rigs with the best powertrains in the business. At affordable prices. Think of them as Japan's Ford Motor Company. Only their cars, trucks and SUV's last longer and look better-and are built for the masses. I know, you're an American and kind of...well...dumb. You have been programmed ta be this way by all the dumb media, TV shows and athletes. But if you do your homework automotively speaking you'll discover what I'm saying here is the truth. So true it would pass the Judge Judith Scheindlin "truth-meter." I guarantee it. Drive on.
      Drakkon
      • 1 Year Ago
      RS200s just give me a... never mind. That 206 just looks mean. I miss the gravel.
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
        montoym
        • 1 Year Ago
        Yeah, confused me too. There was a bunch of hype about it and then suddenly, the EV was back. Not sure what happened there. I'd like to see him drive both and just have a heli pick him up at the top and take him back to the starting line.
      Georg
      • 1 Year Ago
      isnĀ“t Team Meisel with its super light weight build and tuned Carlsson Judd V8 powered Mercedes SLK racing Pikes Peak? At the 2013 Geneva Auto show they made big noise about going to Pikes peak with it... Reto Meisel was several time swiss and german hill race champion..
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Georg
        [blocked]
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