The 2013 edition of the 24 Hours of Le Mans has come to an end, and the results require the use of an eraser on the old record books. If you don't want to know how it ended, now would be the time to stop reading, because the results are just below.
Audi has claimed its fourth consecutive and 12th overall victory at Le Mans, with drivers Tom Kristensen, Allan McNish and Loic Duval crossing the finish line one lap ahead of the No. 8 Toyota TS030. The race was incredibly close at the end – after 23 straight hours of competition, the leading Audi and Toyota cars were on the same lap before Kristensen was able to pass Sebastien Buemi's Toyota with just minutes remaining to win by one lap over his rival.

For those keeping track of such things, this victory marks Kristensen's ninth career win at Le Mans, which is an extension of the record he already owned. Kristensen dedicated his win to fellow Danish driver Allan Simonsen, who died as a result of injuries sustained on the fourth lap of the race.

Buemi finished in second position overall, giving Toyota its best-ever result at Le Mans. Third place was snatched by the No. 3 Audi driven by Lucas Di Grassi, Marc Gene and Oliver Jarvis.

In LMP2, Oak Racing's Nissan-powered Morgan racers came in first and second, followed by G-Drive Racing's Oreca, also powered by Nissan.

The LMGTE Pro class was won by the No. 92 Porsche 911 RSR, followed by the No. 91 Porsche and No. 97 Aston Martin Vantage V8. Corvette Racing finished fourth with its No. 73 C6-ZR1 while their fellow Americans from SRT Motorsports finished in eighth and ninth positions in their brand-new Viper GTS-R racers.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 45 Comments
      Rotation
      • 1 Year Ago
      IIRC Buemi had unlapped himself and Toyota ordered he let himself be passed again so he didn't have to do an additional lap to finish.
      erzhik
      • 1 Year Ago
      How is the race close when they basically lap them?
        Rotation
        • 1 Year Ago
        @erzhik
        There have been far closer Le Mans races lately. But remember this is endurance racing. Repairs mid-race are a big part of what determines how well a car does. Just a small breakdown by Audi could easily have given the lead to Toyota. It happens all the time.
        Myself
        • 1 Year Ago
        @erzhik
        Because they race for 24 hours straight. And if the gap between 1st and 2nd after 24 hours is approximately 3 minutes 30 seconds, that's an equivalent of a photo finish in a regular 90 minute race.
          Georg
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Myself
          3:30min is not close in the modern world thats a comfortable lead ... 2011 was really close as Audi won with 13seconds after 24h over Peugeot. After the last pitstop 40Minutes befor the end, the leading Audi was only 6seconds ahead the 2. place Peugeot and could increase his lead to 13s... after the race they realized they had a silent flat tier which loosesd pressure... investigation of Michelin showed that the winning R18 would have never finished one more lap at full speed...
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
        johnnythemoney
        • 1 Year Ago
        It' their first full season and the first outing at Le Mans in years, and it's not even the same team (it used to be Oreca who ran the Viper effort). Give them a brake. Aston Martin needed a few years to get there, and it's been on and off ever since. Look at the rather unimpressive race by the Corvettes, with a proven car and team, nothing is for granted. I'm not even suprised by the 991 RSR result though. The car may be new (but I wonder how many parts were carried over from the 997 RSR for reliability reasons), but they were out in full force, just getting ready for next year's assault on the P1 category.
          Rotation
          • 1 Year Ago
          @johnnythemoney
          The 991 looked good. The fix for the radiators will be key. The number of 911 RSRs that went out due to radiators in the past 5 years has been staggering.
        Matt
        • 1 Year Ago
        As someone rooting for both teams, having both Vipers finishing top 10 in class and top 35 overall at their first time at Le Mans during what is essentially a shakedown season for a new team makes them very relevant in my opinion. Other drivers said the cars were hard to beat in braking and cornering but you can tell they need more top end power. Once SRT figures out how to get more top end with that restrictor I think we'll see magic happen. They might just need that with how the C7R is shaping up.
        jfa1177
        • 1 Year Ago
        This is a shake down year for Team Viper! Give 'em a break! They need to figure out a rhythm; seeing what works from all aspects of racing. Corvette had a bad race, no question about it. Its not good buts its racing! Corvette has been a dominant force for quite a while; in spite of all the haters. The 991 is a good car but all the previous versions have lived in the shadows of the Corvette and Aston. Its about time Porsche stepped up its game. They have not been relevant for quite awhile; esp in LMP1.
          IOMTT
          • 1 Year Ago
          @jfa1177
          Never heard of the Porsche 935 have we? It is a version (extreme) of the 911 and unlike Corvette or Viper has won LeMans outright beating all the prototypes in 1979 taking the 3 top spots overall including one co-driven by Paul Newman in second. It did rain a lot that year though, slowing the top class (group 6).
          johnnythemoney
          • 1 Year Ago
          @jfa1177
          @sparrk That's a bit of an exageration. You can trace its roots back to 1998 (and there is nothing to be ashamed of that), but I bet there is not a single screw in the same position. The fact alone that this isn't a turbocharged engine requires quite some rework. It's just typical PR or journalist talk to say it's the same engine, derived from, etc, etc. Like with the present Viper, SRT/Chrysler made the mistake of referring to the new chassis as the same as the old one, meaning it's a tubular steel frame as in the previous model, yet people and journos jumped on it thinking it was the same chassis, or just "updated". As if taking a tube from a place and connecting into another position is as easy it seems...
          Rotation
          • 1 Year Ago
          @jfa1177
          sparrk: The engine has gone up from 3.6L to 3.8L to 4.0L (in racing trim) and the fuel injection has changed completely. It's not really the same engine. Porsche has kept to the same principles, which is great, but like everyone else, they have developed their engines a lot in this timeframe.
          sparrk
          • 1 Year Ago
          @jfa1177
          Let's not forget that the 991 RSR still has the Metzger engine ! It's an engine designed in the '90s and first used in the Le Mans winning 1998 911 GT1.
          sparrk
          • 1 Year Ago
          @jfa1177
          @ johnnythemoney, an old block is still an old block, it's remarkable that is still can compete against brand new direct injection engines.
        Cory Stansbury
        • 1 Year Ago
        Finishing both cars, first year out, is not a bad showing. Drivers reported that nobody could touch them in braking or cornering. They'll have to work the rules for more horsepower. I still think it's dumb that your chance at winning is more a function of how well you play the rules than how good your underlying car is...but such is life.
      socalbrett@gmail.com
      So the first and third place Audis get all six of their drivers mentioned in the article, but both times the Toyota is mentioned, only Sebastien Buemi gets credit. At least be consistent. For the record, second place was taken by the No. 8 Toyota driven by Anthony Davidson, Sebastien Buemi and St├ęphane Sarrazin.
        srlalsd1
        • 1 Year Ago
        @socalbrett@gmail.com
        your email is public brah.
        • 1 Year Ago
        @socalbrett@gmail.com
        [blocked]
      Stomp and steer
      • 1 Year Ago
      I can't believe people actually thought that the Vipers would finish higher than the Vettes. And hearing Giles and his excuses is typical. They've got along ways to go just to be equal with the Vettes,let alone beat them.
        Matt
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Stomp and steer
        New team, new cars, not even been racing a full season to finish top ten in class and almost top 30 overall? I think that's a damn good start. Especially considering they didn't have near the setup Oreca did, give SRT Motorsports another season or two and then see where they're are.
      Joe
      • 1 Year Ago
      During Toyotas last Le Mans campaign.. the GT-One finished second in 1999.. The TS030 this year merely tied Toyotas best result.
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
      Drakkon
      • 1 Year Ago
      I wonder how many years is the rendering of the posters accurate. I can think of three in recent times that the order of the cars on the promo is how they actually finish. Conspiracy I say!!
        Raniz
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Drakkon
        That's quite impossible seeing as Toyota has only been racing for 2 years and didn't finish with any of their cars last year.
          Jason
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Raniz
          What he means is that the poster for a respective year has a picture of how that year's event actually finished. This year, the Audi beat the Toyota in the LMP1 class while Porsche took the top GT category. Other years' posters may have been similarly prescient. (though the Audi #1 was not the winning car, instead it was the #2 entry...) One conclusion is that the results this year were predictable!
      Myself
      • 1 Year Ago
      Funny thing is that so far the only Japanese manufacturer to win Le Mans was .... Mazda. I really hoped Toyota could do it this year, but apparently, it did not rain enough. Still, Audis had about 50 hp more, they won fair and square.
        Rotation
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Myself
        Audi gets the most favorable rulings from ACO. VW/Audi/Porsche will be hard to beat as long as they are practically funding Le Mans.
          Georg
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Rotation
          @Max Bramante u fool.. Audi LeMans winning record 5 wins overall with petrol engine (6 if you take into account that the Bentley winning 2003 was powered by a Audi petrol engine from the R8) 5 wins overall with diesel engine 2 wins overall with hybrid 10 times more budget .... you know that from looking in your crystal ball? LOL Toyota has booked with Oreca a higly experience 24h LeMans team ... Oreca has won the 24h of LeMans for Mazda with the 787B in 1991, they have won 2005 the 24h of LeMans for Audi with the R8, they have races the Peugeot 97 HDi FAP nice try to let Audi win look less impressive as it was... u failed
          Georg
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Rotation
          @myself that is a Mazda or JDM fanboy internet mythos that they banned rotary from LeMans after the Mazda victory... 1. BEFOR the 1991 LeMans race it was clear that there were new engine rules in 1992 for the Prototype class1 forcing ALL teams to switch to 3.5l V10 n/a engines like they used in the F1. 2. not only rotary engine were banned from C1 class... all other too...like the 5.0l V8 turbo from Mercedes, or the 7.4l V12 from Jaguar, the 3.2l flat 6 Turbo from Porsche
          jdeli01
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Rotation
          Per FIA WEC rules: 1. Diesel hybrid cars (Audi) are limited 58 liters of fuel while petrol hybrid cars (Toyota) are limited to 76 liters of fuel. 2. Front wheel drive hybrid systems (Audi) can only be used above 120 km/hr while rear wheel hybrid systems (Toyota) can be used at all speeds. Explain to me know how "Audi gets the most favorable rulings from ACO." I think it's more accurate to say the FIA and WEC have bent over backwards to make the non-Audi cars as competitive as possible. Especially when you consider that the petrol cars received a balance of performance adjustment one month before this years race.
          Vision7
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Rotation
          Favorable rulings, really? Most of the rule changes in LMP1 have been made to try to slow Audi down or allow for other teams to close the gap. From the R8 to the current R18, every season we've witnessed rules put in effect which have directly caused Audi to make adjustments to their car in order to overcome something that could have potentially hamstrung their attempts at victory. They earned this win, just as they have earned all the others.
          Max Bramante
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Rotation
          Diesel engines have been favourites for years, that's why audi won so much times beside the fact that they have a budget wich is 10 times more than the toyota one (not that toyota cannot afford to spend it, they're just extremely cheap when it comes to spend money to race), plus audi run with the Joest Team wich is the most competitive in the WEC
          Rotation
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Rotation
          Vision7: You have not at all been paying attention. The minimum weight was increased in LMP1 when the R10 couldn't make the minimum weight for the class. The Diesels were given a fuel cell with more energy. They were given 37% more displacement and double the turbo boost and a restrictor almost 40% larger. You're right, the R8 was slowed year by year, but all gas LMP1s were also slowed with them. Zytek and Judd and indeed all customer engines were driven out of LMP1. Between 2006 and 2010 it was impossible due to the regulations to make a gas car that could complete with a Diesel. Because of these factors, only Audi or Peugeot could win the overall in these years. No customer cars (like Champion Audi) can possibly win Le Mans due to the current regulations. Audi started with the excellent R8 and through the years after has worked hand-in-hand with the ACO to ensure there is little challenge to them. In the IMSA-run ALMS series, the R10 did not have the advantage of such favorable regulations and had to compete on more equal footing and found itself regularly beaten by other competitors.
          Myself
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Rotation
          Exactly, immediately after Mazda won, rotary engines were banned...
      Porsche4life
      • 1 Year Ago
      There is nothing shocking about this news
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