When it comes to green branding, Nissan went downright General Lee this year, vaulting over a host of companies – jumping 16 spots – to reach No. 5 in Interbrand's annual "Best Global Green Brands" survey.

Increased sales for the all-electric Leaf, high safety ratings for the battery electric and Nissan's recent partnership with Ford and Daimler on the development of hydrogen fuel cell drivetrain technology all helped boost Nissan's image among the environmental set. Of course, the Interbrand list was topped by car companies. Toyota, Ford and Honda finished 1-2-3 among green-brand rankings, followed up by Panasonic and then Nissan.

Having cut the Leaf's price earlier this year, Nissan through May almost tripled sales from a year earlier to 7,614 units. Check out Interbrand's write-up here and watch Nissan's video on the subject below.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 7 Comments
      Spec
      • 1 Year Ago
      But is that really a victory? You want to sell your cars to everyone not just green-minded people. And worse, we have lug-heads that will actively avoid green products. Someone even did a study on this and found that some conservative people were less likely to buy a green-labeled product even if that green-labeled product cost less and provided better value! (The study was on light-bulbs.)
        EZEE
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Spec
        Hey Spec On the lightbulbs - I am not thrilled with CFL's - In some areas, they seem slow to come on - and of course, I put those in the areas where I flip a light on in the middle of the night. On the flip side, I have them outside for my exterior lighting and I am happy with those. The mercury inside them is a concern if the possibility of breakage exists, and there are kids/animals around. As with cars, I am not emotionally attached to one or another, but there are legit concerns. Also, if I were to go liberal, the working conditions of where they are made are scary, in some instances. The handling of the mercury is simply not adequate, and people are getting sick. Of course, my iPad was built at place where they installed nets to catch the suicide jumpers as they flung themselves off the building, only to then take them and then put them back on the lines! With cars, the best thing anyone can do is simply let a person drive one. I got an Escape Hybrid some years ago and instantly loved it. I rode the brake on ramps to charge up my battery, hit the accelerator smoothly so the gas motor wouldn't turn on (it had the start stop technology). I made the analog meter go all the way to one side when hitting the brakess to make sure I was getting the charge. The coolest thing was going further than it was supposed to go, or faster, on pure electric. The point is, within 2 days I totally loved that vehicle, and it really wasn't the best of the hybrids out there. I would suggest a full hybrid, over something 'lite' like e-assist. A plug in would obviously be better. For me, the term 'performance' took on a totally different point of view. Yes, it is fun to hit the gas, hear a roar, and have the car jump, but I was smiling constantly as I took off, and the RPM was at 0. Also, evil right winger that I am, I would creep the car up on friends in electric mode, while they were talking, and then honk the horn or maybe even bump them. Only sound would be tires on pavement. On the flip side, I got into trouble once. I was with a bunch of guys in Atlanta and there was a (most likely) lower priced escort on a street corner. We are parked at a light, yacking about her, how much she cost, all of that - then we noticed she was glaring at us - angry. We realized that with the engine off, and the fact that we were being guys (ie, loud and obnoxious), she heard us. Oops!
          EZEE
          • 1 Year Ago
          @EZEE
          At $12 a bulb, the led is a bit rich for my blood.
          Spec
          • 1 Year Ago
          @EZEE
          CFLs? Get with the program, old man . . . LED is what is hip today. ;-) With LEDs there is no mercury, no delayed start-up, they are much more robust, they work with dimmers, and the color spectrum is better. CFLs are still much cheaper though. And the mercury is a tiny amount . . . they have lots of warnings but that is largely CYA. More mercury will be emitted by a power plant to power an incandescent bulb instead of a CFL than is in the CFL.
        DarylMc
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Spec
        Hi Spec Can you provide a link for that study. In my experience when it comes to lighting, a certain amount of people are willing to pay more than an economical price. I would be interested to read it.
          Spec
          • 1 Year Ago
          @DarylMc
          http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/energy/2013/04/130430-light-bulb-labeling/
      • 1 Year Ago
      I've purchased a used, 2011 Nissan Leaf which has the LED headlights, plus they're height adjustable. They seem much brighter than typical halogen bulbs, nearly as bright (and blueish) as Xenon. I love them! I've been keeping a diary about my Leaf experience. EV curious? Follow along! http://EVearlyAdopter.blogspot.com