In testing the durability of its upcoming fullsize Transit vans, Ford has begun using autonomous robotic technology to pilot vehicles through the punishing courses of its Michigan Proving Grounds test facility. The autonomous tech allows Ford to run more durability tests in a single day than it could with human drivers, as well as create even more challenging tests that wouldn't be safe to run with a human behind the wheel.

The technology being used was developed by Utah-based Autonomous Solutions, and isn't quite like the totally autonomous vehicles being developed by companies like Google and Audi for use out in the real world. Rather, Ford's autonomous test vehicles follow a pre-programmed course and their position is tracked via GPS and cameras that are being monitored from a central control room. Though the route is predetermined, the robotic control module operates the steering, acceleration and braking to keep the vehicle on course as it drives over broken concrete, cobblestones, metal grates, rough gravel, mud pits and oversize speed bumps.

Scroll down to watch the robotic drivers in action, though be warned that you're headed for disappointment if you expect to see a Centurion behind the wheel (nerd alert!). The setup looks more like a Mythbusters experiment than a scene from Battlestar Galactica.

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Ford Using Robots to Improve "Built Ford Tough" Durability Testing of its Trucks

• Ford is first automaker to develop robotic technology that drives vehicles during new accelerated high-impact on-road and off-road durability testing

• Robotically driven vehicles ideally suited for durability test conditions that could prove too taxing for human drivers

• New technology used to ensure Ford trucks, including the all-new Transit van family, are Built Ford Tough


DEARBORN, mich., June 15, 2013 – Ford engineers have developed the industry's first robotic test driving program – now in use at the company's Michigan Proving Grounds in Romeo, Mich. – to meet demands that Ford trucks undergo ever more strenuous Built Ford Tough testing with greater frequency.

The pilot program has been used most recently for durability testing of Ford's all-new full-size Transit van, which launches in 2014.

"Some of the tests we do on our commercial trucks for North America are so strenuous that we limit the exposure time for human drivers," says Dave Payne, manager, vehicle development operations. "The challenge is completing testing to meet vehicle development time lines while keeping our drivers comfortable.

"Robotic testing allows us to do both," he says. "We accelerate durability testing while simultaneously increasing the productivity of our other programs by redeploying drivers to those areas, such as noise level and vehicle dynamics testing."

The durability technology includes a robotic control module installed in the test vehicle that controls vehicle steering, acceleration and braking. The module is set to follow a preprogrammed course, and the vehicle's position is tracked via cameras in a central control room and GPS accurate to plus/minus one inch. Should the vehicle stray from its programmed course, engineers have the ability to stop the vehicle, course correct as necessary, and restart the test. Onboard sensors can command a full stop if a pedestrian or another vehicle strays into the path.

The robotically driven vehicles are expected to repeatedly perform tests on torturous surfaces with names like Silver Creek, Power Hop Hill and Curb Your Enthusiasm. The tests can compress 10 years of daily driving abuse into courses just a few hundred yards long, with surfaces that include broken concrete, cobblestones, metal grates, rough gravel, mud pits and oversized speed bumps.

All North American Ford trucks must pass this battery of durability tests before they're certified for customer use. Until now, testing speeds and repetitions for specific scenarios were limited due to restrictions placed on human drivers, who were allowed to drive certain rigorous courses only once a day.

The use of robots now accelerates this testing, allowing an unlimited number of repeats until Ford engineers are satisfied with the results. Robots also allow Ford to develop even more challenging durability tests to build tougher trucks.

Ford engineers worked with Utah-based Autonomous Solutions Inc. to design and manufacture the software and components that enable autonomous, robotic operation of the test vehicle.

"We're very excited to work with Ford for autonomous vehicle testing," said Mel Torrie, CEO of Autonomous Solutions Inc. "The reliability, durability and performance enhancements we've developed with Ford will not only help them reach their safety and accuracy goals, but will also improve vehicle automation in other areas such as mining, agriculture and the U.S. military."

Ford engineers designed and deployed the robotic technology with two goals in mind: protecting human drivers and engineering Ford trucks to be tougher than ever.

"The goal here was not to develop a truly autonomous vehicle that can drive itself on city streets," said Payne. "Our objective was to create a test track solution that allows for this type of intense testing that could take our vehicles to the most extreme limits of their engineering while ensuring the safety of all involved."

# # #

About Autonomous Solutions, Inc.
For more than 12 years, Autonomous Solutions, Inc. has been a world leader in unmanned ground vehicle systems and components. From their northern Utah headquarters, ASI serves clients in military, agriculture, industrial/mining, and automotive proving ground industries with solutions ranging from driver assistance up to full vehicle autonomy. ASI's world-class engineering staff is dedicated to ideals of innovation, quality, simplicity, and safety.

About Ford Motor Company
Ford Motor Company, a global automotive industry leader based in Dearborn, Mich., manufactures or distributes automobiles across six continents. With about 175,000 employees and 65 plants worldwide, the company's automotive brands include Ford and Lincoln. The company provides financial services through Ford Motor Credit Company. For more information regarding Ford and its products worldwide, please visit http://corporate.ford.com.


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  • 38 Comments
      rstonnerdd
      • 1 Year Ago
      I am sure the software behind the autonomous driving is quite sophisticated but could not help notice the cable ties on the steering wheel and would not be surprised to find a foot or two of duct tape hiding in there somewhere. Certainly built for function, not fashion.
        Andrew
        • 1 Year Ago
        @rstonnerdd
        If its not broken dont fix it. Sometimes the simplest solution is the best.
      TruthHertz
      • 1 Year Ago
      What a bunch of crap and wasted money. Just do things the Toyota way and let the public test the vehicles for you.
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
        Pandabear
        • 1 Year Ago
        It takes 20x as much working programming a robot than to train an employee, and it takes 100x as much work to design a robot than to hire a good employee.
        Sheldon
        • 1 Year Ago
        Not sure your post makes any sort of sense, but if you are actually asking a question, a little reading will answer it. Try: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luddite
      Mihai Mishu
      • 1 Year Ago
      That sucks! Robots taking our jobs.
        Andrew
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Mihai Mishu
        They tirrrkk errrr JERRRBBSS!
        tool0117
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Mihai Mishu
        Can't tell if trolling or dumb
          Dean
          • 1 Year Ago
          @tool0117
          I'm honestly hoping it's a bad attempt at humor...
        wilkegm
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Mihai Mishu
        But seriously- that had to open a huge can of labor relations worms for Ford. We have a simillar scenario here, where the push is to run more test cells with one operator. Obviously this is being met with resistance.
      JJ
      • 1 Year Ago
      Wow, Lincoln is the only remaing company under ford !
      Jesus!
      • 1 Year Ago
      Hopefully the robots are better at this than painting. I have personally seen 4 vehicles in the last 3 years on the lot brand bew with dried paint drips. I also was an unfortunate purchaser or one, a 2010, 32k F150. Always check the paint and every inch of a new vehicle people. Dont make the same mistake I did.
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Jesus!
        [blocked]
        merlot066
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Jesus!
        The majority of paint imperfections on new vehicles are the result of damage during transportation that is fixed poorly (poor shade matching, drips, etc.) If there are widespread problems, perhaps Ford or any other brand could consider switching transportation partners, but the problem doesn't seem to be that widespread.
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
        Andrew
        • 1 Year Ago
        Hahaha. Because we all know how good robotic technology was in the 70's. Dont forget that there are people who need to set up the robots in the cars and monitor them.
      k.naz
      • 1 Year Ago
      I'm all for the progression and development of technology, but what is frustrating about today and the near future is that A) You can't row your own car B) You won't drive it yourself. Call me old fashioned, but I still think we should be able to drive cars ourselves even if they start to hover or fly.
        • 1 Year Ago
        @k.naz
        [blocked]
          k.naz
          • 1 Year Ago
          This guy not only does not know the art of heel and toeing, but is also a racist twit. The reason why people are so bad is because most do not know how to drive a car. When I was growing up, I was continuously reminded that until I learn how to perfectly shift gears on a vehicle from small to large, only then will I be allowed to drive. Plus, nothing beats the euphoria of driving a naturally aspirated engine with 6 gears through twists and turns, especially in the mountains.
        Griffen W
        • 1 Year Ago
        @k.naz
        I agree with you about manual transmissions and driving yourself, but if there's gonna be flying cars there better be computer control all over that thing. The last thing I want is a drunk flyer crashing into my house at 200 mph
      • 1 Year Ago
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      JaredN
      • 1 Year Ago
      Gotta love the zip-ties.
      tool0117
      • 1 Year Ago
      america, f*** yeah!
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