It not easy building a true high-performance electric vehicle. Even if money isn't a problem, there is a dearth of component suppliers with the kind of equipment and expertise you would need to succeed. Tesla Motors is unlikely to hand out examples of the secret sauce that gives its Model S Performance 416 horsepower, for example. Similarly, the system that motivates the Mercedes-Benz AMG SLS Electric Drive is jealously guarded and not for sale. Enter Rimac Automobili.

Not content to simply build custom variations of its lust-worthy Concept_One, the Croatian company has now broadened its business plan and will now help you build your own electric supercar or, perhaps, a small fleet of them. Need a light, compact set of motors – with their own reduction gearboxes – capable of putting out a peak 654 kilowatts (877 horsepower)? Rimac has you covered. How about a sophisticated control unit to route that kind of power from a battery pack to the motors? No problem. In fact, the young outfit can deal with everything from chassis design to creating a custom infotainment system.

One small problem we can see with the componentry, however, is its appearance. It just looks too good to bury it within an automobile. If only there was a way to build a see-through car, we muse to ourselves, this would be the kind of electro-jewlry to use in such a vehicle.

Now, whilst we ponder the possibilities of an eventual Rimac-powered Formula E entry swathed in an invisible epidermis, we invite you to saunter through the extensive gallery above. Check out the official press release by simply scrolling below.
Show full PR text
Rimac Automobili powertrain systems and services now available for customers

Sveta Nedelja, June 3rd, 2013. – The Rimac R&D team developed both the Concept_One and the technology under the carbon-fiber skin in order to achieve the Concept_One's remarkable performance. Various industries and individuals can now benefit from this technology. Rimac Automobili is now offering cutting-edge technology and their services to the industry and individuals. The company's newly updated web-site will lead you into the world of outstanding innovation and technology.

Founder and CEO of Rimac Automobili, Mate Rimac says: "Pioneers have always been at the forefront of technological advancement of mankind. Rimac Automobili has challenged the status-quo by having the vision to revolutionize and reinvent the sportscar with its unique technology. Today we are excited to offer customers the opportunity to use our technology and know-how to create new and exciting products. Our biggest advantage is that we are to deliver the full service – powertrain, batteries, design, chassis, moulds, body-work, infotainment systems and many other aspects of the vehicle. We can lead the entire process from the idea to the finished product under one roof, what enables us to act fast and efficient. Being a car manufacturer ourselves, we know what it takes to develop a car and how hard it can be to integrate systems from various suppliers. Now it is possible to source everything from one address."

Rimac Automobili's CTO, Igor Pongrac explains that Rimac Automobili drivetrain systems deliver unmatched performance combined with very high energy and packaging efficiency. The high level of integration makes these systems the ideal choice for high-performance applications. Every component is matched perfectly to the entire system which results in the most power-dense systems on the market. It is also important to mention that Rimac Automobili powertrain and battery systems are designed to suit in a variety of applications – not necessarily automotive. The modular design of these components enables to be adapted fast and cost effective according to the wishes of every customer. Motors and Transmissions, Battery Systems and BMS, Power Distribution and Management, Infotainment Systems, Low Voltage Electric Systems and a variety of Auxiliary systems are only some of them as Rimac Automobili constantly engages into development activities.

Rimac Automobili produces the world's fastest and most exciting electric supercars. The Company came into public focus in September 2011 after presenting their first model, the Concept_One, at the Frankfurt Motor Show. The Cocnept_One, reaches 100 km/h (62 mph) from standstill in less than 3 seconds and accelerates to over 300 km/h thanks to its unique drivetrain system with over 1.000 horsepower.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 24 Comments
      Dave D
      • 1 Year Ago
      Is that what the guys are still using at the Isle of Man TT race?
      HVH20
      • 1 Year Ago
      Looks like quality "prototype" components. Cost should be astronomical, nothing is optimized, and reliability will be spotty for some time until they get all the bugs work out. They still look pretty and probably work.
        2 wheeled menace
        • 1 Year Ago
        @HVH20
        How do you know any of this? Opened em up? measured the stator lamination thickness, found the pole count and stator dimensions? examined the coil design? put the motor on a dyno? Or do you just talk smack about new things as a rule?
      JP
      • 1 Year Ago
      Great looking stuff from Mate Rimac and his crew. Nice to see a high end product becoming available.
      bluepongo1
      • 1 Year Ago
      Hmmm... couldn't find buyers for a car 10X more expensive than a Tesla Roadster, (that didn't perform 10X better) so they're selling all the extra tech they have taking up space and unsold. :-(
        Dave D
        • 1 Year Ago
        @bluepongo1
        I think that's a serious "glass half empty" you have there bud. LOL They may yet sell the Rimac and if they find that it's a business advantage to become a supplier to some markets, good for them....and us.
      SublimeKnight
      • 1 Year Ago
      The EV DIY community needs a SBC. The Warps are DC, so at best they're flatheads. The HPEVS offerings are fairly weak. While I doubt Rimac is the one to do it, someone stands to gain a pretty significant market if they can put out a $5000 150kW - 200kW system that includes the motor, inverter, and charger.
        2 wheeled menace
        • 1 Year Ago
        @SublimeKnight
        I'm with you on this one. I'm not sure why you were downrated. Maybe someone got defensive about their 200 pound rewound forklift motor they put in their car :D. Motors for DIY car conversions are not nearly as impressive as they could be. What we have in the motorcycle and eBike world blows away those large brushed motors, sorry to say. Even the motorcycle brushed motors are better ( PERM, Motenergy, Lemco, etc ) - reaching into 90-95% efficiencies and amazing power densities. Even more impressive is some of the motors made by Astro Flight; there is a guy with a 5lb astro motored bike with just forced air pushing something like 9kW out of it, with a top speed of 66mph. It would take a big dumb ~24lb brushed motor of the quality that the car motors are made of to produce that kind of power. That is a motor that hangs out in the 90-97% efficiency range. No big brushie touches that. That being said, some folks related to rimac supply some pretty impressive motors to us ebike/motorcycle guys, which are unfortunately a bit on the expensive side. I'd like to see the spec sheets on these..
        2 wheeled menace
        • 1 Year Ago
        @SublimeKnight
        You're not taking stator losses and brush into account when talking about higher RPMs.. A rewound forklift motor with tons of poles, designed to produce as much torque as possible at just a few thousand RPM is a different animal than an extremely well balanced motor with a razor thin laminations and a low pole count spinning to 5k-10krpm. You spin up that forklift motor to 10krpm and it will fail in short order, the bearings will die an early death and the stator will contact the magnets, filling the motor with magnet dust which confuses the hall sensors.. before it dies, it will have super high stator losses and copper losses while it operates, giving high power per pound but low efficiency, making tons of heat. In the ebike world a common trick is to take a motor designed for a 26 inch wheel and lace a 20 inch wheel to it, and add voltage to compensate. What you get is higher torque output, but you also reduce your efficiency. I've built a few bikes that could blow past motorcycles and most cars on the road this way, but the battery life is reduced and heat build up can get pretty bad when the cooling from running at a higher RPM doesn't compensate. The design of these rewound forklift / elevator motors is simply poor. Yes, it is low cost, but you ultimately end up needing more battery energy to move the vehicle if you did the calculations vs a higher efficiency motor. I would much rather use less energy and pay more for the motor.
        Giza Plateau
        • 1 Year Ago
        @SublimeKnight
        The HPEVS motors would actually be fairly good with a more powerful suitable controller. It's the Curtis that is the weakest/overpriced element. An AC50 can deliver more power if allowed to spin faster (assuming it can handle it). If you double the rpm of a motor you double the power. So a 220V 650A controller for an AC50 would make it quite powerful. Or a 300V 500A controller for an AC51. Jack very erroneously thinks that the power should be at low rpm and that motors will always be weak at higher rpm. It's as wrong as can be but when Jack has chosen a stance it takes a long time and a lot of kicking and screaming to get him to change. The high rpm is precisely the key to the very nice power density that Tesla Motors have in their motors. 38kg in the Tesla Roadster motor and I'm guessing around 70kg in the Model S motor. 13000rpm for roadster and 15000rpm for Model S. And where it gets really interesting is that 45kg industrial AC induction motors cost as little as 140$ Similarly the controller can be much cheaper than the Curtis. Way less than 1000$ for same power. The right IGBTs are wonderfully inexpensive.
        jeff
        • 1 Year Ago
        @SublimeKnight
        The latest Twin AC35 are not exactly weak..... http://hpevs.com/catalog-ac-35x2.htm That should make any car under 3000lb fairly quick....
      Domenick
      • 1 Year Ago
      Here's a link to some specs. Try not to drool on your keyboard. :) http://www.rimac-automobili.com/products-and-services/motors-and-transmissions-23
      Giza Plateau
      • 1 Year Ago
      Good looking componentry isn't a problem at all, isn't that right Jack. The price and availability can be a problem however.
      bluepongo1
      • 1 Year Ago
      Darth Sidious.jpg
      2 wheeled menace
      • 1 Year Ago
      Domenick posted this, but i figured i'd start a new comment... http://www.rimac-automobili.com/products-and-services/motors-and-transmissions-23 Really impressive actually! 94.9% peak efficiency, 517hp continuous, 10,600rpm peak, 10 poles, awesome. For comparison to the motors i was talking about... The upper end rimac is 250lbs and puts out >500hp continuous. Peak efficiency is about 95%. The netgain warp11 is ~230lbs and according to netgain, their motor is rated at something like 43hp continuous on 72v. Peak efficiency is about 87.5%. Which one would you rather have in your EV? :)
      Joeviocoe
      • 1 Year Ago
      Progress in the DIY market is nice... but the problem has always been with finding batteries that wouldn't weigh down the car, and would last. Is Thundersky still our best option for home builds?
        2 wheeled menace
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Joeviocoe
        You're right. Large cell availability for EV cars is also lacking. The cheap huge 100whr/kg lifepo4 is what tends to be used, and the C rate suuuuuuucks :( The racing guys have started using what i use in my bike - RC Lipo packs. Which is kind of crazy given the safety record of RC Lipo packs. But that's what's out there as far as i know.
          2 wheeled menace
          • 1 Year Ago
          @2 wheeled menace
          I'm not sure. Some professional racers have been able to get nice cells that the hobbyists have not been able to buy, like A123 20AH pouches, EIG cells etc.
      Ryan
      • 1 Year Ago
      Metallic paint job, and some orange liquid tight. I can make a motor look good too. I know there are the race car types who don't care about money, but the motor shouldn't be the expensive part.
        2 wheeled menace
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Ryan
        Cost is a part of designing a high quality motor.. there are plenty of rewound forklift motors out there that are heavy for their power and have only upper 80% efficiency figures. You can buy one of those and buy extra battery to make up for the extra pounds that must be moved along the road, and the extra heat that will be produced by the motor.. or you can spend extra on a high efficiency motor. We will know what kind of motor this is when a spec sheet is given. Everything else is just blind speculation. Do you even build, bro? :D
      Marco Polo
      • 1 Year Ago
      Interesting product, from an interesting company.
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