The motorsports community lost a member over the weekend when a track worker was killed just after the checkered flag waved at Formula One's Canadian Grand Prix in Montreal. When the race ended, track officials were working to remove the crashed racecar of Formula 1 driver Esteban Gutierrez (shown above) when a mobile crane lifting the car ran over the unidentified 38-year-old volunteer in a freak accident.

According to The Globe and Mail, the 10-year track veteran slipped and fell, and the crane operator was unable to see him in time to keep from running over his body. Emergency workers were quick to respond, and the unnamed worker, a volunteer, was soon taken to the hospital by helicopter after being stabilized by track medics. Sadly, he later died as a result of his injuries.


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  • 22 Comments
      Vincent Teron
      • 1 Year Ago
      It amazes me that for all the BILLIONS of dollars Bernie Ecclestone rakes in, he still refuses to pay track workers for the hazardous work that these volunteers do; volunteers withhout whom F1 wouldn\'t exist.
      awd23
      • 1 Year Ago
      The guy had been a volunteer at that grand prix for 10 years. He knew what he was doing. It was an accident and there will be an investigation.
      bgruia
      • 1 Year Ago
      The organizers of the Canadian Grand Prix had their warning years ago: http://youtu.be/5rBdNthEv5M
      Typesbad
      • 1 Year Ago
      Damn! That's a brutal way to go.
      Al Terego
      • 1 Year Ago
      Why is a billion dollar business taking volunteers? Spend some money and hire full-time professionals to reduce the likelihood of these tragic events from happening. Just one more reason why I refuse to support F1. RIP to the fallen volunteer.
        m_2012
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Al Terego
        Same reason ALL billion dollar corps do it - money!
        mbukukanyau
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Al Terego
        I would volunteer at a sports event. Any sporting event. Its called service to the community.
      Steven
      • 1 Year Ago
      I saw some pictures of the incident on Jalopnik...a before and after shot of the poor guy. Something about dropping his radio and falling under the tractor as they moving the car. R.I.P. those
      sloturbo
      • 1 Year Ago
      I have never understood why F1 uses cranes is this manner. Lifting cars high (too) into the air. Couldn't they just lift it on to a flatbed and drive it back to the garage. Monaco is different, because the lift over the wall.
        Brian P
        • 1 Year Ago
        @sloturbo
        A wrecked car might not be able to roll on its wheels. Besides, this incident does not appear to have had anything to do with the car having been lifted up in the air. A collision between a pedestrian and a piece of mobile equipment can happen no matter what that mobile equipment is - a crane, or a tow truck, or a flatbed, or a forklift, or anything else.
          Greg
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Brian P
          Basic HSE: - Don't lift anything higher than necessary. Regardless of its relevance to this accident, bad lifting practices are a recipe for accidents. - Never be in the path of moving machinery (or be in a position where falling down puts you in the path). Ever. - If you are an operator of machinery, never move it unless you can see exactly where it is going and what's there. If these are volunteers, there's a high probability that they are not properly trained for safety
      Malhaar
      • 1 Year Ago
      It is really sad that these track workers don't get the credit they deserve. Without them the sport would almost be impossible, yet they are left behind the scenes and almost unheard of or never seen. RIP to him and I say thank you for the hard work he contributed to the world motorsport. My thoughts go out to his friends and family.
      vizcarmb
      • 1 Year Ago
      Do they have OSHA in Canada?
        Brian P
        • 1 Year Ago
        @vizcarmb
        No, because that is a US organization, but we most certainly have provincial government safety departments - in this case, the CSST (Commission de la sante et de la securite du travail). And this ties into the point made about corner workers on racetracks being volunteers. Their function requires them to place themselves into potentially hazardous circumstances. Since they are volunteers, they are not employees. Since they are not employees, the occupational health and safety regulations largely do not apply. If such regulations were to be applied, we essentially could not have many forms of motor racing in this country. Therefore, the corner workers are volunteers. It's the same in the US, by the way. (Don't give me comparisons to NASCAR - that's different - and you can keep it.)
          Al Le
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Brian P
          But was the crane operator a volunteer? Did they just hand the keys over to someone that just showed up?
          Greg
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Brian P
          The CSST? Why not the CDLSEDLSDT?
      dewd7
      • 1 Year Ago
      At the end of the race, broadcaster Martin Brundle mentioned not liking the cranes as a driver, just added more things to hit, more things to go wrong. There was no mention of the accident during the presentation, but I wonder of they already knew about it, prompting Brundle's comment?
      Steven
      • 1 Year Ago
      Sorry...just wanted to say that those folks do a dangerous job. What a lousy way to go... I hope BE opens his wallet and helps out the family...
      drydockx
      • 1 Year Ago
      2 eyes and 4 wheels? Can't watch everywhere
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