One of the risks associated with vintage car racing is damaging a rare, priceless piece of automotive history, but we're pretty sure that one recent participant is just happy to be alive. Edmund Burgess, of Lavenham, UK, was participating in the Prescott Speed Hill Climb in Gloucestershire, UK when, according to Car Buzz, the brakes reportedly failed on his 1924 Bugatti Type 13 causing it to go off course and roll over.

With an open cockpit on the car, all that was protecting Burgess were a helmet, goggles and a jacket, and while the video shows that his head came very close to making contact with the wall and ground, and that he was briefly trapped under the car, he fortunately didn't suffer any serious injuries.

Too bad the same can't be said for the Bugatti. The vintage racer, worth an estimated 250,000 British pounds (about $390,000 US), was heavily damaged, but the report says that Burgess is determined to get it fixed and racing again in just eight weeks. So what does a racer do after crashing his rare sports car and live to race another day? Probably the same thing we'd all do. Grab a beer. The video of the crash is posted below.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 30 Comments
      Brandon Allen
      • 1 Year Ago
      Easy to fix a car that's made of wood and hand smithed horse carraige parts. In the US, you'd just need to go visit your local Amish settlement and ask for 'Zeek'
      56Jalopy
      • 1 Year Ago
      I always have more respect for owners that drive their vintage cars than the trailer queens. I know he will keep his word. I drive my old 1956 for errands two or three times a week, if I can't use it why have it.
        theautojunkie
        • 1 Year Ago
        @56Jalopy
        ....Jalopy more true words have never been said about money-too-deep collectors who only want the cars to put on there mantle. The automobile is only made for one thing, driving.....
        Teleny411
        • 1 Year Ago
        @56Jalopy
        Same here!
      bgruia
      • 1 Year Ago
      I love that people are willing to spend the money and risk driving these historical cars. For the future, perhaps a motorcycle rider's armour would prove a better bet with the open cockpits.
      gearhead
      • 1 Year Ago
      Wow. That video looked like he was going to be quite a bit more injured than he was. Glad he is ok. And even though the car will probably cost more to fix than I make in a good year...the damage could have certainly been worse. Still, hats off to him for actually taking it out and driving the beautiful car rather than leaving it in his garage.
      rollie
      • 1 Year Ago
      When you have the dubloons to own and race such a car, you also have the checkbook to have it repaired. "Go about your business, nothing to see here....."
      Steven
      • 1 Year Ago
      **** happens...He's ok. Get it fixed and get back on the track. Good for him in the first place to have the stones to use it for what it was intended.
      Vincent Teron
      • 1 Year Ago
      This guy is my new hero.
      Randy
      • 1 Year Ago
      I'm torn! I love the idea of racing a classic but hate the idea of damaging a classic, regardless of price or nameplate.
      Mr E
      • 1 Year Ago
      Glad to hear he's ok! It's kind of funny to contrast this story with the one about the BMW driver from earlier today.
      Dom Enic
      • 1 Year Ago
      That's a real gear head if you ask me, glad to see he made it through and wants to keep on racing
      Get Squirly
      • 1 Year Ago
      I love seeing these historic races! Good for him for driving that thing! Glad he came out alright. Not many people can say that they crashed a half-million dollar car :)
      ihatedavebushell
      • 1 Year Ago
      that will buff right out!
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