If you've ever looked at a car with nearly 1,000 horsepower and wondered why anyone needs that amount of thrust, you may want to take a look at the video below. In it, one gentleman details his descent into Toyota Supra madness, starting with a pristine factory example and stumbling down the rabbit hole of modification. What makes this particular clip interesting is just how honest the owner is as he explains the evolution of his car. He doesn't just prattle off a list of parts like he's reading the menu at an IHOP.

Instead, he painstakingly pulls us through the car's growth, detailing each iteration and what pushed him to the next stage of the build every time. From this point of view, it looks less like someone walked into a shop and lit a massive stack of $100 bills on fire and more like a quasi-logical progression of events. Or at least it does to me. You can check out the build in the video below, complete with plenty of Fast and the Furious references and racing. Win, win, win.



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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 51 Comments
      Twittavelli
      • 1 Year Ago
      Awesome journey.
      mbukukanyau
      • 1 Year Ago
      At least the guy is honest. I love how documents the downhill trend
      vttookster
      • 1 Year Ago
      When he was talking about the 1000-HP GT-R: "I got spanked like a little Asian toddler that drew on the wall." LOL.
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
      OhioJim
      • 1 Year Ago
      Bloated Celica my ass! The last Supra that shared anything with a Celica was the Mk II and it was suspension tuned by Lotus and was at the top of its class over 30 years ago. Do you have any experience at all with this car on which to base your casual dismissal? Do you know that it has what would be still be considered a state of the art suspension today? Do you know that it is so solidly built that even at 20 years old it feels like it is crafted out of a single billet of steel? Do you know that 20 years later it still stops in the same distance as cars costing over $100 K do today? This car is a pure performance machine and the equal in many ways to the overpriced Germain cars that so many people worship. It is much easier to just follow the herd and not bother to understand the mechanical art that makes a truly fine automobile. Learn something about what you comment on before spewing stupidity in the future please. It came from the factory with an engine strong enough to handle four times the original HP and a chassis that will leave many currently produced cars on the side of the road. If you have never driven this car (I have) maybe you should hold your speculation until you know more about what you so casually post.
        Carpinions
        • 1 Year Ago
        @OhioJim
        You're a Supra guy. I get it. But over the last 10 years I think you guys may well have surpassed the Mustang and Corvette crowds in the metric tons of S you talk about how great the Supra is. In the era of F&F, the last thing that is going against the herd is Supra fandom. The Supra is a well-built, iron-blocked, classical 2-door FE/RWD coupe with decent power and a manual tranny. That's it. It's not this sleeper that secretly holds 550hp stock from the factory, can out-corner an F1 car, out-brake any car before or since, and do all that it does while feeling like a bank vault. The Supra had power similar to its homegrown and global competitors. It performed similarly to those cars. It cost around the same as those cars. It's engine tech wasn't especially advanced for its era, and neither was its drivetrain. I've driven very well taken care of SC300s/400s and some not-so-hot ones, and cars on that platform (of which the Supra is one) can fall apart like any other car if not taken care of. Congratulations. The Supra feels like it's milled from billet steel. Many older cars would feel similarly designed if well-taken care of for 2 decades. You're not proving much there. Suspension? How would it be "state of the art" now, especially taking GM's MR tech into consideration? Brakes great? Alright, but that has never been the Supra’s #1 identifiable trait. Buy the Supra! It stops like a champ from typical highway speeds! 1,200hp support out of the box? Again, other engines are capable of lots of power. It’s not like you can get that 1,200hp without spending tens of thousands to get it. That’s like saying I have the power of an i7 quad-core processor if my laptop has a mere i3. Of course it could have been more, but it’s not. Until you take out a second mortgage. And that goes for any car. Will its supposedly supreme chassis survive indefinite 1,200hp drag runs? How safe and usable is a 1,200hp modified car on the street? It has to be a garage queen until the weekend anyway. I think the Supra’s pretty hot myself, but don’t make it out to be its era’s Mclaren F1, Ford GT40, or Ferrari F40. It flat out isn’t. It’s a good-looking, somewhat rare GT car that performed right on target for its time, but stock-for-stock would be handed its ass and still-beating heart dressed in a hat with mustard on top against anything released in the last 5-7 years, especially when you consider the absurd used prices on the thing.
        Rotation
        • 1 Year Ago
        @OhioJim
        Since when is dissing the Supra the herd mentality? I think you have a pariah complex.
      TopGun
      • 1 Year Ago
      Drove a ~ 750 HP version. Apparently made a heck of a drag car, yet pretty much useless as a road car IMO.
      DRO3000
      • 1 Year Ago
      Im sure Im gonna get voted down but Ive always thought the Supra was so overrated, especially the price of admission on the used market these days
        eeenok
        • 1 Year Ago
        @DRO3000
        you need to factor in not what you get in the stock car, but how legendarily robust these engines are for demented tuning. enthusiasm for the engine probably drives most of the enthusiasm and price for the car
          Matt
          • 1 Year Ago
          @eeenok
          The funny thing is the still showroom stock, never been modified Supras go for more than the 1200hp monsters.
        Matt
        • 1 Year Ago
        @DRO3000
        Some cars appreciate, Toyota should be lucky that they have a model worthy of having that happen.
        eeenok
        • 1 Year Ago
        @DRO3000
        you need to factor in not what you get in the stock car, but how legendarily robust these engines are for demented tuning. enthusiasm for the engine probably drives most of the enthusiasm and price for the car
          Carpinions
          • 1 Year Ago
          @eeenok
          But what does the engine having that kind of robustness get you if it costs so much to procure the car to begin with, and then you still have to spend crazy amounts of cash to get 1,200hp out of it? It seriously costs first-gen used Viper money to get a Supra in decent shape (that may still have been modified). Buy an SC300 and use that if power is the goal. There are a lot more of them, they resale much lower, it's essentially the same car, and for what you save you can upgrade the car to perform like a Supra. There are definitely cheaper ways to get into that engine.
      jebibudala
      • 1 Year Ago
      The Supra is the fastest and most powerful car ever made of all time.
        gttlesgibson
        • 1 Year Ago
        @jebibudala
        There are a bunch of Italian and German people who would laugh if they read this. And some good ol' boys named Ken or Tony who run quarter miles in under 5 seconds - they'd laugh at you too.
      WindsWilling
      • 1 Year Ago
      Ah yes, this, the MR2 Turbo, the All-Trac. Back when Toyota was relevant to auto enthusiasts. Maybe if they sell enough econobox 86's they'll come out with something as awesome as these mostly forgotten about legends. But I doubt it, Toyota's heart stopped beating a decade ago, and there's no paddles in sight.
        Brian
        • 1 Year Ago
        @WindsWilling
        Are you kidding me? First and foremost, the new president (Akio Toyoda) is actively participating in motorsports and even raced with Hiromu Naruse (Toyota's master driver, RIP) in the 24 hours Nurburgring Endurance race. He pushed the LFA and the 86 to production. If it's anyone you want at the head of Toyota, it'd be him. The LFA and the 86 are "in touch" with the driver (unlike complex cars that make use of computers and programs like the GTR) and are considered the most fun in their respective classes (reference to several reviews and Jeremy Clarkson's review of the LFA as possibly the most fun car he's ever driven). At a European event last year, "chief engineer Tetsuya Tada said, 'The president (Akio Toyoda) has asked me to make a successor to the Supra as soon as possible.' " If you look back 2-3 years, sure I can agree they had no soul, but they are surely headed in the right direction and it's starting to trickle down to the DNA of other cars among the Toyota/Lexus line. No paddles in sight? I think not.
          Matt
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Brian
          Well, who here can afford an LFA? The 86 is fun and all but it isn't the second coming of Christ otherwise Jesus would drive a Miata. There are quite a few people with valid points about it needing a bit more oomph. They have both ends of the spectrum covered, now give us that sweet middle ground with a proper Supra successor. Don't pull a Honda and make it a hybrid, Nissan is killing it with the GT-R, I doubt we'll see that sort of success with the new NSX. We haven't seen any hints of the next Supra so it could very well turn out a dud or miss expectations, don't go praising them yet. I know people who won't accept anything less than a new inline 6.
          bubba_roe
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Brian
          It doesnt matter unless they actually build something for the public. The 86 is cool, but is still nothing compared to Toyota of the 90s.
          Steve Mulcahy
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Brian
          Exactly, Clarkson loved the way the GT86 drove and how he could get it to drift at such low speeds. He absolutely adored the LFA though, which I could see a Supra being based off of in some way.
        jase.s
        • 1 Year Ago
        @WindsWilling
        In order for MR2 Turbo, Celica All-Trac, and 2JZ-GTE Supra to exist, the cars preceding them had to do well enough in sales to justify the enthusiast market. The AW11 MR2, ST165 Celica, and MA70 Supra (and even AE86 Corolla) were not the best enthusiast cars at the time, but they sold well. The 86 is doing the same job. It is an attempt to pave the way for better cars. Though keep in mind, when the MR2 Turbo, Celica All-Trac, and Supra twin turbo were on sale, they didn't do too well in the market (they were even priced reasonably cheap by todays standards, too). It is mostly after they went out of production that they started to develop their cult addiction and vast appreciation. So don't blame Toyota for their apprehension of bringing back performance vehicles, they simply don't want to make the same mistake twice.
      Storm
      • 1 Year Ago
      barf
      • 1 Year Ago
      where does someone get the money for those mods and over what period of time are these done
        mazeroni
        • 1 Year Ago
        A job is a good start.... Keep in mind when he takes parts out he likely sells them without too big of a loss.
        graphikzking
        • 1 Year Ago
        When I didn't have the money for cars I modded motorcycles. Now that I've grown up, I have an autocross car, mr2 spyder that could use upgrades but I get soooo much satisfaction beating cars with $2000 suspensions, $2500 brembos and cheaper slicks. I have a total of $13000 into the car including the purchase price. I could mod cars but I elected to buy a large house, take a big vacation and fund my retirement. I have plenty of friends that mod cars but they aren't putting away that money for retirement. One way to get the funds though is definitely cheap labor. That's the most expensive part of the upgrades usually.
        • 1 Year Ago
        [blocked]
      Really
      • 1 Year Ago
      Great video! Another reason why I'm happy with my 600 WHP MKIV Supra. Fun to drive and unique.
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