• 2013 Ford Fusion Energi: The all-new Fusion Energi plug-in hybrid will deliver more than 100 MPGe, a miles-per-gallon equivalency metric.

  • 2013 Ford Fusion Energi: The all-new Fusion Energi plug-in hybrid will deliver more than 100 MPGe, a miles-per-gallon equivalency metric.

  • 2013 Ford Fusion Energi: The all-new Fusion Energi plug-in hybrid will deliver more than 100 MPGe, a miles-per-gallon equivalency metric.

  • 2013 Ford Fusion Energi: The all-new Fusion Energi plug-in hybrid will deliver more than 100 MPGe, a miles-per-gallon equivalency metric.

  • 2013 Ford Fusion Energi: The all-new Fusion Energi plug-in hybrid will deliver more than 100 MPGe, a miles-per-gallon equivalency metric.

  • 2013 Ford Fusion Energi: The all-new Fusion Energi plug-in hybrid will deliver more than 100 MPGe, a miles-per-gallon equivalency metric.

  • 2013 Ford Fusion Energi: The all-new Fusion Energi plug-in hybrid will deliver more than 100 MPGe, a miles-per-gallon equivalency metric.

  • 2013 Ford Fusion Energi: The all-new Fusion Energi plug-in hybrid will deliver more than 100 MPGe, a miles-per-gallon equivalency metric.

  • 2013 Ford Fusion Energi: The all-new Fusion Energi plug-in hybrid will deliver more than 100 MPGe, a miles-per-gallon equivalency metric.

  • 2013 Ford Fusion Energi: The all-new Fusion Energi plug-in hybrid will deliver more than 100 MPGe, a miles-per-gallon equivalency metric.

  • 2013 Ford Fusion Energi: The all-new Fusion Energi plug-in hybrid will deliver more than 100 MPGe, a miles-per-gallon equivalency metric.

  • 2013 Ford Fusion Energi: The all-new Fusion Energi plug-in hybrid will deliver more than 100 MPGe, a miles-per-gallon equivalency metric.

California really is the Golden State for the Blue Oval. For proof, look to the words of one J Mays, Ford's vice president of global design, who told Inhabitat that hybrid sales are far better than the company expected out west. "Our hybrids are flying off the shelves in California," he said, adding that the US hybrid market as a whole is "growing slowly but steadily."

Ford's newer plug-in hybrids – the C-Max and the Fusion Energi – are also exceeding company estimates, though Mays said a more comprehensive infrastructure will be needed for that particular sector to make substantial gains.

The numbers bear May's statements out. Through May, Ford's hybrid, plug-in electric and battery-electric sales were five times their 2012 levels, up to more than 38,000 units, making the US automaker the second-best advanced-powertrain vehicle maker, after Toyota.

California, which is easily the country's largest green-car market, has also served Honda and Fiat well, as those companies are now running waiting lists for their Fit EV and 500e, respectively.


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  • 24 Comments
      raktmn
      • 2 Years Ago
      Storing cars on shelves in California is probably a bad idea. I'm not surprised they fly right off every time there is an earthquake.... =) Seriously though, the more people who see friends, coworkers, and relatives driving around PHEV's, EV's, and hybrids, the more they are likely to buy one themselves. It is good to see them catching on, hopefully it will keep spreading to other states.
        Ele Truk
        • 2 Years Ago
        @raktmn
        Yea, I've seen this phrase before about cars. So please, let's stop using it in relation to cars. "Flying out the doors" is acceptable, although the flying part is also questionable. "Selling like hotcakes" but then how exactly do hotcakes sell? IHOP is hardly the largest restaurant chain.
      markrogo
      • 2 Years Ago
      The Fusion is beautiful, but wow the trunk is stupid on the Energi. Stupid enough we couldn't seriously consider buying one.
      EZEE
      • 2 Years Ago
      Good for Ford. And California for that matter!
        Betty m
        • 2 Years Ago
        @EZEE
        Since I started with my on-line business I earn $62 each quarter-hour. It sounds unbelievable however you wont forgive yourself if you do not check it out. >>>>>>>>>> www.www.Day35.cℴm >>>>>>>>>
        Marco Polo
        • 2 Years Ago
        @EZEE
        @ EZEE Absolutely, ditto !
      David Murray
      • 2 Years Ago
      If they could match the lease deals that other manufacturers are doing, I bet they could sell a lot more of these. I've only seen one C-Max energi on the roads here in Ft.Worth. I've seen a handful of regular C-Max hybrids. I have not seen a Fusion hybrid or energi model on the new body style yet.
      EVSUPERHERO
      • 2 Years Ago
      Just think what sales would be if you came out with a hybrid in 2008 Ford? A real hybrid like you have now not a mild hybrid. CA with their high fuel prices are where these cars will payoff sooner. That and the HOV lane access.
        Jesse Gurr
        • 2 Years Ago
        @EVSUPERHERO
        Ford has had a "real" hybrid for almost a decade now. They came out with the Escape hybrid in 2004. It was the first real AWD hybrid that I know of as well.
          Ele Truk
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Jesse Gurr
          I don't know. A 30 MPG (City) SUV is still hard to find.
          Spec
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Jesse Gurr
          It was a pretty crappy hybrid though. I owned it and it was . . . meh. It was more about giving you a feeling of power when you had a smaller engine instead of significantly saving gas.
      EVSUPERHERO
      • 2 Years Ago
      These plugin hybrids utilize the EV charging stations way more than EV's. Funny how things work out.
        Ele Truk
        • 2 Years Ago
        @EVSUPERHERO
        Tiny battery needs charging more often. Plug-in hybrid owners really do want to drive pure electric, but aren't quite there to commit to a full BEV.
      BYALTF
      • 2 Years Ago
      A month or two ago I read an article on cars with the shortest days days of supply. The C-Max and Fusion Hybrid had the shortest. Both only had in the low teens of days on hand. When you only have 13 days of supply, clearly you could sell many more if you had them. I am surprised many C-Max I see, even in the plains states where gas is normally lower priced.
      Democritus
      • 2 Years Ago
      ". . . though Mays said a more comprehensive infrastructure will be needed for that particular sector to make substantial gains." Well, if Tesla can do it, why not Ford? Don't wait for it to magically appear, Mr. Mays.
        raktmn
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Democritus
        Tesla has even reached out to other manufacturers, saying that they are willing to work with other companies to integrate their cars to work with Tesla's chargers. All Ford has to do is follow the leader.
        Actionable Mango
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Democritus
        Tesla hasn't done it yet. Their comprehensive infrastructure still has years to go. Many times in my life I have bought something based on future promises, and many times I've been burned. I now have a wait-and-see attitude.
      hgeorgech
      • 2 Years Ago
      You'd expect that in CA, right .. with high gasoline prices? Hopefully, they have plentiful plug-in stations at work, home, shopping centers, ball parks, church, etc., etc! However, for the "typical" driver who puts 12,000 mi/yr on a vehicle, the "break even" on many of these green cars (where fuel savings = the added cost initially) falls somewhere between 4 and 6 years .... and the persons buying these won't solve CA's air quality problems ... that could take 20+ years - if everyone there stopped driving - entirely!!
        Rob Mahrt
        • 2 Years Ago
        @hgeorgech
        While I will agree that payoff is 4-6 years, why wouldn't this fact be a positive rather than a slight negative which seems to be how you put it. If the extra cost of a car pays off in 6 years, and the average car on the road is 10-11 years. That means the consumer gets 4-5 years of extra savings. Let's say we are moving from 24mpg (Avg vehicle) to 47mpg (~average hybrid). One would save $1,000 for every year past 6 years you owned the car. (@$4.00 average price) Even if you sold the car, the increased price should continue through the the secondary market. So, over the life of a product, if a hybrid in the end of the product life provides the same amount of enjoyment, functionality, usability, but costs $4-5k less to operate over its useful life, then I am not sure why anyone buying a new vehicle (at least in specific categories) are not all buying the Hybrids. I guess consumers have trouble paying for a long term economic benefit up front.
        DaveMart
        • 2 Years Ago
        @hgeorgech
        12,000 miles is around the average for a car per year. The older a car gets though, the less miles folk tend to do in it, with new cars doing 15,000 miles or so a year. People don't trust their old beaters to go too far, and those who really must do a lot of miles tend to buy new so that they can do it reliably. Of course, BEVs have their own issues with doing a high mileage, at any rate if any large part of that is in long journeys, but that does not apply to hybrids, PHEV drivers etc, and anyway since in North America two thirds of families have more than one car, a lot of people manage to do pretty high mileage in their BEV although they may use their ICE for long journeys. The bottom line is that pay-back is a bit quicker for cars which are cheap to fuel than you would expect by using 12,000 miles per annum as the average. That can make quite a difference to viability for someone thinking of buying a new car.
        flynnhadskeath
        • 2 Years Ago
        @hgeorgech
        The pay back does take a long time with these cars but don't forget the peer value of a car like this in a place like California. As for infuatucture, don't for get these plug in hybrids with their small batteries can recharge at a 110.
          Rotation
          • 2 Years Ago
          @flynnhadskeath
          Energis can drive solo in the carpool lane in California.
      Grendal
      • 2 Years Ago
      No duh. California has horrible traffic issues. You can save hours of commute time by being in the HOV lane.
        Jesse Gurr
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Grendal
        They are talking mostly about the regular hybrids too, not just the Energis. Unless you think they have sold 38,000 CMax/Fusion Energis since the beginning of the year?
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