US plug-in vehicle drivers have public access to about 180 more charging stations than they did a month ago, as the rate of additional station deployments appears to be settling at about 200 units a month.

There were 6,048 publicly accessible stations as of May 28, up from 5,866 stations on April 26, according to the US Department of Energy. Station numbers totaled about 5,200 as of the end of last year.

Walgreens continues to be the most EV-friendly retailer, increasing its number of charging stations by five this month to a total of 369. Kohl's was home to 59 stations, while Kwik Trip stores accounted for 52 stations, up from 48 a month ago. Whole Foods and McDonald's had 40 and 37 stations, respectively.

Regionally, the West Coast continued to be the easiest place for plug-in drivers to recharge. California boosted its nation-leading total of public stations by 42 stations to 1,318. Washington State had 339 stations, while Oregon had 326 stations.

Meanwhile, Texas and Florida had 461 and 371 stations, respectively. Tennessee, where Nissan started US production on the all-electric Leaf earlier this year, had 293 public stations deployed.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 54 Comments
      aatheus
      • 1 Year Ago
      Whereas some states, like Wyoming, have two. Two registered public charging stations on PlugShare.
        Spec
        • 1 Year Ago
        @aatheus
        Well . . . outside of the major cities, they are probably not much use there. But the rural people should LOVE EVs . . . every EV on the road means more gasoline for them.
      Rotation
      • 1 Year Ago
      Letstakeawalk: A public EV spot is no less a public spot than a public handicapped spot is. Both are public spots but only certain portions of the public can park there. Does a public bathroom become not public because it is restricted to only one sex? And you're stretching this group thing beyond any meaning. You are harkening back to your comments on the EV public charging law. That law requires the parking spots be marked as EV parking spots (by referencing a federal standard) and then California law prohibits parking in a spot which is designated for EVs for any purpose other than charging. So you're saying that the California law which establishes public charging also makes all those spots non-public and thus does nothing? You don't make any sense.
      Letstakeawalk
      • 1 Year Ago
      More to the point, there's nothing requiring a "No Parking - EV charging only" sign at all. Indeed, these reserved spaces will become less and less common as more and more EVSEs are installed on public streets. There will come a day when EVSEs are so common that every space will have access to one, and ICE owners will still need to park in those spaces, regardless.
      Ryan
      • 1 Year Ago
      It is rest areas between cities that need to be connected. They might not be used for daily travel, but to travel to the next town, it would be required.
      Dave
      • 1 Year Ago
      "There were 6,048 publicly accessible stations as of May 28, up from 5,866 stations on April 26, according to the US Department of Energy." That's approximately equal to two gas stations.
        Dave
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Dave
        Of course, it depends on the charging station. Level 2 charger: 6.6 kw X 3 miles per kwh ~ 19.8 miles of range added per hour Gas station: 7.5 gallons per minute X 30 miles per gallon X 60 minutes per hour X 12 pumps = 162,000 miles or range added per hour 162,000 / 19.8 ~ 8,200 So, a single gas station is approximately equal to 8,000 level 2 chargers.
          Dave
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Dave
          Supercharger (upgraded) 120 kw X 3 miles per kwh ~ 360 miles of range added per hour 162,000 / 360 ~ 450 So, a typical gas station is only equal to 450 superchargers
        no1bondfan
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Dave
        You are comparing apples-to-oranges. While gas stations are the ONLY way that anybody can fuel up their car, public charging stations aren't even the primary way the electric car owners charge up their vehicles. Most of those vehicles are charged at home, and any of them can be trickle-charged from a standard outlet. Those are installed in every home, and there are 69,865,957 single family homes in the US. There are only about 121,446 gas stations. Since your comparison isn't apt, you might as well say that electric car chargers outnumber gas stations 575-to-1.
          Joeviocoe
          • 1 Year Ago
          @no1bondfan
          So.... are we trying to replace 250 million cars this year? If you use the same idiotic metric against your favored and precious hydrogen fuel cell cars... there is also no way that we could fuel them either.
          Dave
          • 1 Year Ago
          @no1bondfan
          "there are 69,865,957 single family homes in the US." And there are 250,000,000 cars on the road.
          Dave
          • 1 Year Ago
          @no1bondfan
          "If you use the same idiotic metric against your favored and precious hydrogen fuel cell cars... there is also no way that we could fuel them either." Wrong. You are a lying worthless piece of filth, as usual. I did no such thing. As usual, you have completely misconstrued the facts. In fact, if I made this same comparison hydrogen vs. gasoline, it is entirely possible to build a hydrogen station with approximately the same footprint as a gasoline station. BEVs require a charger for every vehicle. For most vehicles that will be a public charger. BEVs would require 250,000,000+ chargers to fuel an entire fleet. Hydrogen cars require 150,000 fueling stations, just like gasoline. Simple as that. That is the only statement I made. Nothing about cost. Although, of course, BEV infrastructure would be much more expensive, as you know.
        JakeY
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Dave
        Not sure what's the point of your calculations, but the implication is that "2 gas stations" can serve 100k plug-ins (the current US fleet) or 50k plug-ins per gas station. But the actual numbers are 250 million cars and 122k gas stations or about 2k cars per gas station. What's missing in your analysis is the geographic distribution of the chargers, the fact plug-ins can charge unattended/overnight, and that most are charged with home chargers (not included in those numbers).
          JakeY
          • 1 Year Ago
          @JakeY
          I'm getting that from the fact that there are already 100k plug-ins and from your comment: "There were 6,048 publicly accessible stations...That's approximately equal to two gas stations." That implies 2 gas stations can serve 100k plug-ins! And this fact shows your argument that plug-in infrastructure requires a public charger for each car is wrong. The current numbers already show it's very far from the case (there's 16.67 cars per charger right now).
          Dave
          • 1 Year Ago
          @JakeY
          The fact is that most cars don't have homes. They will need public chargers.
          Dave
          • 1 Year Ago
          @JakeY
          Me - "So, a single gas station is approximately equal to 8,000 level 2 chargers." You - "the implication is that "2 gas stations" can serve 100k plug-ins (the current US fleet) or 50k plug-ins per gas station." How do you get that???
          ElectricAvenue
          • 1 Year Ago
          @JakeY
          "The fact is that most cars don't have homes." And your proof of that "fact" is... ? I suspect that you're wrong, and that in North America most cars are parked daily in private spaces. Many of those spaces are multiple-family dwellings, but it's perfectly feasible to provide charging points in underground or at-grade parking facilities. There are some neighbourhoods where on-street parking is the only option, but these are hardly the majority. As has already been pointed out: even if your "fact" were true, so what? You're building another straw man. There is a market for at least tens of millions of EVs in the United States which can be plugged in "at home". Who said that every car will be an EV in the near future?
        ElectricAvenue
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Dave
        "That's approximately equal to two gas stations." That's the most inane comparison I've seen in some time. Of what relevance is the total energy throughput? It doesn't relate to normal use. 6048 separate facilities does not "equal" two facilities. Are we now going to compare gasoline stations to marine fuel loading facilities? I bet gas stations are pretty lame compared to the rate at which bunker fuel can be loaded on ships. How about the rate at which jet fuel is loaded on airplanes? One airport with a fuel hydrant system is "equal" to dozens and dozens of gasoline stations. And then you go and say things like "You are a lying worthless piece of filth, as usual" and "You are a lying worthless waste of a human life" Well, I'm convinced. Your reasoned defence of the relevance of your original argument has won me over.
          JakeY
          • 1 Year Ago
          @ElectricAvenue
          @Dave A couple of points why you are wrong (and why you need to do a little more thinking): 1) Most people will be charging overnight at home, so there is no need for public charger in the amount you suggest. The fact that there are 16 plug-ins per public charger right now illustrates this point quite well. 2) the average demand per gas station is much lower than the maximum throughput 3) Superchargers/interstate quick chargers only need to handle 100+ mile travel. And according to the US travel survey, less than 1% of trips and 15% of vehicle miles fall under this category. http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/policyinformation/pubs/pl08021/fig4_5.cfm We can actually calculate the implications of this. The maximum throughput of gas stations is 121,446 stations * 162,000 miles of range added per hour, so 19.6 billion miles per hour or 171.7 trillion miles per year. Actual travel is 3 trillion vehicle miles per year. http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/policyinformation/pubs/hf/pl11028/ So for point #2 that is a 57x factor. That means rather than 38 superchargers per pump, you only need 2/3 of a supercharger per pump to handle average demand (of course you may want more to reduce wait times). 100+ mile travel is even less demand (15%) and brings that down to 1/10 of a supercharger per pump. Even if you want superchargers to have the same throughput for the 100+ mile trips, the 15% brings the count down to less than 6. But all this may be academic given Elon will demonstrate on June 20th a way to recharge batteries faster than filling up a gas tank.
          Dave
          • 1 Year Ago
          @ElectricAvenue
          And don't forget that these public chargers will be used during daytime hours when there is little electricity to spare. BEVs are a cool hobby, not the basis for a national transportation system. They will someday make good commuter vehicles for 10 or 20 percent of the population, but not much more than that. Even Carlos Ghosn has said as much.
          Dave
          • 1 Year Ago
          @ElectricAvenue
          "That's the most inane comparison I've seen in some time." Stop and think. Stop and think. Stop and think. If we remove all of the ICE vehicles and replace them with BEVs. And we then must replace all of the gas stations along the interstates with charging stations. A supercharger station would require ~38 superchargers for every gas pump. A level 2 charging station would require ~680 chargers for every gas pump. And, more importantly, the massive high voltage supply lines. This is serious. As for my opinion of Joe, I make no apology. He repeats the same lies over and over. And denies any facts that he doesn't like. He is dishonest and he spreads lies to gullible minds.
          Dave
          • 4 Months Ago
          @ElectricAvenue
          And don't forget. This is what I was responding to. "Another slew of idiotic comparisons from Dave." That is what the worthless waste of a human life said in response to my factual and mathematically correct calculations.
        Joeviocoe
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Dave
        Another slew of idiotic comparisons from Dave. Nobody uses Charging stations in anyway even remotely similar to Gas stations. They charge at home. How is this for a comparison... 1 House = Infinite Gas stations... since technically, an EV that charges at home might never NEED to visit any other source of energy.
          Dave
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Joeviocoe
          You are a lying worthless waste of a human life. Stop selling your lies. Everything I said was exactly true. There is nothing you have ever said that wasn't biased.
      Rotation
      • 1 Year Ago
      There are 9 L2 chargers ready to go in Hayward, been almost ready for two months. I'm surprised there were only 42 chargers added in California in May. There were 9 DCFCs added in May in the SF Bay Area alone.
      paulwesterberg
      • 1 Year Ago
      At first when I was really excited to see that Kwik Trip gas stations were adding chargers but then saw this article: http://www.startribune.com/business/123485854.html "the outlets only provide 110 volts, which, charging for the few minutes it takes to grab coffee and use the bathroom, would barely get someone out of the parking lot and down the block" So one of these chargers might allow an ev driver that is running perilously low on battery to make it the last few miles of their trip, but otherwise these are essentially useless. This looks like Kwik Trip just wants to show its customers that electric vehicles cannot charge quickly and they should just keep buying gas.
        Spec
        • 1 Year Ago
        @paulwesterberg
        110V chargers can be quite useful at places of employment, airports, and other places where cars are parked for long periods of time. But a Kwik-E-Mart? That is pointless.
        SublimeKnight
        • 1 Year Ago
        @paulwesterberg
        If they count 110V as a charging station, then every outdoor public outlet is a charging station since every EV sold comes with a 110V charger.
        Rob Mahrt
        • 1 Year Ago
        @paulwesterberg
        My 2 bedroom 720 square foot condo has 17 EV charging stations. Just pull up on the street and find yourself a massive extension cord, accroding to this logic.
          Spec
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Rob Mahrt
          Well . . . probably far fewer since you can probably only put on EVSE on each 15 or 20 Amp circuit.
        SublimeKnight
        • 1 Year Ago
        @paulwesterberg
        LOL... 110? Seriously? Might as well put hand crank generators out there.
      Rob Mahrt
      • 1 Year Ago
      Would like to see infomation at the city level for the top 100 cities in the U.S., I think that would be more telling. For example, California has 4396 chargers and D.C. has only 116 chargers. But the total area of DC is only 68 square miles which may make it one of the easiest place to find a charging station at 1.7 stations every square mile. I would assume LA, SF and other major hubs in California would have more infrastructure than DC, but would be interesting to see.
      Rotation
      • 1 Year Ago
      I agree the law is toothless. But that law requires that spots be marked as EV spots. And then the law says a spot marked as an EV spot is EV-only and enforceable. Of course it probably won't be heavily enforced, but that's a different matter. A baseball stadium is not considered a public space. It is an area accessible by paid admission-only and that makes it non-public. You again are trying to stretch the groups part of that law beyond any sense. It says the groups may be employees, or residents, etc. It doesn't say that if you make it for redheads only it is no longer a public space and therefore no legal requirements apply. As I mentioned before, you cannot turn a public space into not a public space just by saying you don't consider it a public space. There are legal specifications as to what is, and a parking spot for a business does fall under the law even if it is for customers only.
      Letstakeawalk
      • 1 Year Ago
      "22511. (a)A local authority, by ordinance or resolution, and a person in lawful possession of an offstreet parking facility may designate stalls or spaces in an offstreet parking facility owned or operated by that local authority or person for the exclusive purpose of charging and parking a vehicle that is connected for electric charging purposes." They *may* - but they are not required to. It follows that: "(e) If the parking facility is privately owned and public parking is prohibited by the posting of a sign meeting the requirements of paragraph (1) of subdivision (a) of Section 22658, the requirements of subdivision (b) may be met by the posting of a sign immediately adjacent to, and visible from, each stall or space indicating that a vehicle not meeting the requirements of subdivision (a) will be removed at the owner’s expense and containing the telephone number of the local traffic law enforcement agency." If it is a privately owned off-street parking facility, the space may be made non-public by posting a sign meeting the legal requirements.
      Letstakeawalk
      • 1 Year Ago
      I'd like to point out (since this photo illustrates it so well) that because of the posting of the "No Parking" sign, this now meets CA legal requirements to be no longer accessible to the general public or considered a "public parking space".
        Nick Kordich
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Letstakeawalk
        "Image Credit: OregonDOT - C.C. License 2.0" I'd like to point out this particular charger lies outside the authority of the suede/denim secret police.
          Letstakeawalk
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Nick Kordich
          Noted. But it well illustrates an EVSE with a "No Parking" sign which limits the use of that space to a specific group of users.
        Rotation
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Letstakeawalk
        Is that right? I thought this was part of the mandated signing for EV spots. Which law says that says a sign which says only EVs can park makes that not a public EV parking spot? It's funny if you go to Sacramento they have some of the most inconsistent signage. And they make the laws there! I've actually seen an EV-only, handicapped-only parking spot! It's green with the handicapped marker in the middle too and both sets of signs. It's in Silicon Valley of course.
      Spec
      • 1 Year Ago
      That is kinda disappointing considering that we are adding some 5000+ plug-in vehicles each month.
        paulwesterberg
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Spec
        So that means approx 5k residential chargers are being added each month. As an electric vehicle owner installation of public chargers is somewhat interesting, but I haven't had the occasion to use one as my vehicle always has plenty of charge to run around town during the day because it charges in my garage at night. A real system of fast chargers along interstate routes might make it possible to do more daytrips with an electric car, but we have a hybrid vehicle that we use for longer trips, but only Tesla has vehicle and the willpower to make long distance EV travel a reality.
          Spec
          • 1 Year Ago
          @paulwesterberg
          And a real system of fast-chargers is currently hampered by the current fast-charger standards war. Grrr. grumble.
          JakeY
          • 1 Year Ago
          @paulwesterberg
          @Rotation Some are chargers can be easily converted to SAE DC but not all. The Aerovironment unit above is one such example. And the point Dave R raised is still valid even if chargers can be converted since you also have to add labor and possibly permitting costs for a connector retrofit. A lot of the newer local charging infrastructure guidelines now suggest waiting for SAE DC instead of going full bore with CHAdeMO. It's still a better idea for most charger owners to wait for dual connector stations (that's exactly what evGo is doing) so their stations don't have to be retrofitted.
          canuckinaz
          • 1 Year Ago
          @paulwesterberg
          @Rotation It's completely false to assume that a switch from a CHAdeMO-compliant charger to a J1772-compliant charger is going to be cheap or trivial. The communications protocol, amongst a host of other characteristics, is completely different. It's not just the plug. Dave R is correct in suggesting that if the SAE standard wins out that there will be a lot of stranded assets out there, and there is indeed resistance to installing CHAdeMO DCFCs because of it.
          Rotation
          • 1 Year Ago
          @paulwesterberg
          What war? There's no SAE combo chargers or cars yet. All that's important is the chargers can be converted or dual-converted when the time comes. The only fast-charging war there is right now is CHAdeMO versus Supercharger.
          Dave R
          • 1 Year Ago
          @paulwesterberg
          "The only fast-charging war there is right now is CHAdeMO versus Supercharger." While that may be true, the mere presence of the combo plug standard and the lack of unity among all manufactures creates resistance in installing DC charging stations. If you had to pay $20-50k for charging hardware that might be obsolete in a couple years would you do it?
          Rotation
          • 1 Year Ago
          @paulwesterberg
          Dave R: 95% of the cost of those chargers is in the electronics to supply the power. Here's the manual for the EATON DCFC. http://www.eaton.com/ecm/idcplg?IdcService=GET_FILE&allowInterrupt=1&RevisionSelectionMethod=LatestReleased&noSaveAs=0&Rendition=Primary&dDocName=TD0EV00004E Look at page 8. See item "11" and the plug "6"? Those are the only things which must be replaced to switch a charger from CHAdeMO to SAE. The cost to convert will be tiny. Blink put them in an even better position putting two probes on each DCFC. It isn't as big an issue as you make it out to be. I go up to Vacaville, California and see L2s that were converted from Tesla Roadster to J1772 (they still say Tesla on them), so this isn't even a new thing. The big problem with the standards are is only that as soon as SAE comes along, LEAF users may find they can't use chargers that they were previously able to use.
          Rotation
          • 1 Year Ago
          @paulwesterberg
          canuckinaz: Yes, I know the communications are different. The communications are done within the tiny module "11" I mentioned. I said it would have to be replaced. This still amounts to a tiny portion of the cost of the unit. It's just not a big issue. There is no reason chargers cannot be updated. Blink even planned for it. You're just FUDing. Actionable Mango: I didn't say CHAdeMO will win. I don't think it will win. But my point is there is no war which is messing stuff up. As a vendor, there is no reason not to install chargers given they will be easily converted. And as a customer, unless you pull up to a Tesla supercharger, there is no chance you cannot use the DCFC you just drove up to right now, because it's a CHAdeMO and that's what your car has too. There will be a war later, a war in which there are many chargers I cannot use appearing. But that's later and it cannot be said that that is what is causing problems right now.
          Actionable Mango
          • 1 Year Ago
          @paulwesterberg
          The lack of SAE chargers doesn't mean there is no war. The war is being fought through legislation and manufacturer's plans. CHAdeMO is first. Doesn't mean they will win. People have pointed out it is too slow for the huge battery packs needed for long distance EV travel.
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