honda_fcx_clarity_large_16
  • honda_fcx_clarity_large_16
  • honda_fcx_clarity_large_01
  • honda_fcx_clarity_large_02
  • honda_fcx_clarity_large_03
  • honda_fcx_clarity_large_13
  • honda_fcx_clarity_large_04
  • honda_fcx_clarity_large_15
  • honda_fcx_clarity_large_09
  • honda_fcx_clarity_large_06
  • honda_fcx_clarity_large_07
  • honda_fcx_clarity_large_08
  • honda_fcx_clarity_large_10
  • honda_fcx_clarity_large_11
  • honda_fcx_clarity_large_12
  • honda_fcx_clarity_large_14
  • honda_fcx_clarity_large_17
  • honda_fcx_clarity_large_18
  • honda_fcx_clarity_large_19
  • honda_fcx_clarity_large_20
  • honda_fcx_clarity_large_21
  • honda_fcx_clarity_large_22
  • honda_fcx_clarity_large_23
  • honda_fcx_clarity_large_24
  • honda_fcx_clarity_large_25
  • honda_fcx_clarity_large_26
  • honda_fcx_clarity_large_27
  • honda_fcx_clarity_large_05
  • honda_fcx_clarity_large_28
  • honda_fcx_clarity_large_29
  • honda_fcx_clarity_large_30
  • honda_fcx_clarity_large_31
  • honda_fcx_clarity_large_32
  • honda_fcx_clarity_large_33
  • honda_fcx_clarity_large_34
  • honda_fcx_clarity_large_35
  • honda_fcx_clarity_large_36
  • honda_fcx_clarity_large_37
  • honda_fcx_clarity_large_38
  • honda_fcx_clarity_large_39
  • honda_fcx_clarity_large_40
  • honda_fcx_clarity_large_41
Honda has joined up with industry colleagues and become a member of the H2USA partnership dedicated to the development and commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. The US Department of Energy program was started up last month and includes Toyota, Mercedes, Hyundai, Nissan and other manufacturers, government agencies and suppliers.

H2USA is a public-private partnership focused primarily on advancing the hydrogen fueling infrastructure to make fuel cell electric vehicles more viable for US consumers. The automakers participating in the project are looking into the best ways to encourage adoption of fuel cell electric vehicles, plus solutions to make the hydrogen highway infrastructure more cost effective.

While its sales numbers have never hit the top of the charts, Honda was the first automaker to lease a modern fuel cell electric vehicle – the FCX Clarity – to US retail customers. With a new wave of H2 vehicles scheduled to arrive in the next few years, H2USA will support development of the hydrogen refueling infrastructure and leverage other hydrogen energy sources including natural gas and renewables, Steven Center, American Honda's vice president of environmental business development, said in a company statement.

Honda is one of a group of foreign automakers to become a member, with none of the Detroit 3 yet to join the partnership. General Motors has shown interest in fuel cell electric vehicles through its Chevrolet Equinox fuel cell SUV. Through Project Driveway, participants have put in a lot of miles behind the wheel and shared their experiences with GM's research project.


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 58 Comments
      Letstakeawalk
      • 2 Years Ago
      "... compare supercharger stations, which are open to the public..." It bears continual repeating, Supercharger stations are *not* open to the public. Access to them is limited to a specific group of individuals.
      Joeviocoe
      • 2 Years Ago
      " the use of a Supercharger is reserved to an exclusive group of people. Anyone else - even another BEV that has been modified - is prohibited from using one." Listening to Musk recently saying that he is open to sharing the Supercharger Network with other EV OEM's * ... makes me think that this 'exclusivity' will not be a problem by the time H2 starts to become a question. *Tesla will want to charge OEM's a licensing fee to be incorporated into the cost of their EV, since Tesla plans to keep the Superchargers FREE per charge.*
      CoolWaters
      • 2 Years Ago
      Since hydrogen will never be cheap, what's the point of this project? Hydrogen isn't available unless you convert natural gas, so why would you take a cheaper fuel and convert it to a more expensive fuel? You already have gas/electric hybrids that will always be cheaper. We already have electrics with the range, TESLA. Electric range is improving and will surely be Double it's current range in 7 years. This is just a total waste of government, private money.
        DaveMart
        • 2 Years Ago
        @CoolWaters
        So you can't obtain hydrogen from anything except natural gas? Why don't you find out some basic facts first?
        DaveMart
        • 2 Years Ago
        @CoolWaters
        2WM: South Korea alone reckon that they can power 500,000 fuel cell cars on their present industrial waste hydrogen. That is a pr3etty good contribution before you consider other sources.
      Dave
      • 2 Years Ago
      "Such an idiotic, trollish comparison, once again Dave." The comparison proves that the hardware is readily available. If you want to ignore the facts, it is your choice.
      Ryan
      • 2 Years Ago
      I would bet good money that Tesla will complete their entire network of high speed super chargers before there are enough hydrogen stations to drive across Arizona.
        Letstakeawalk
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ryan
        Ryan, check out this video. A hydrogen station can be set up in just a couple of days, just about anywhere. http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=kjGaNGhz1pE
          Letstakeawalk
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Letstakeawalk
          Obviously, it is a small modular station, meant to be a temporary solution. However, it showcases how easily the network can be expanded. A small station of such size can easily handle the needs of an apartment building, or a small neighborhood. Or, be set up along major transportation routes to facilitate inter-city travel. Not all H2 stations will cost $2million a pop. This small "starter-station" illustrates how the hydrogen infrastructure can start small and scale up as needed, when and where needed.
          Joeviocoe
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Letstakeawalk
          Well, to be honest, even though the modular fueling station is a fast way to set up.... watching the video, they said that there was work done to prepare the site prior to arrival. Site selection, Zoning and construction of the area prior to placing a volatile fuel dispensery takes more work than the video implies. Also, that was a SMALL station for 200 total FCVs (not per day, total supported).
        Ryan
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ryan
        And Tesla is a small start-up that doesn't have near the amounts of money that Honda, GM, Toyota, etc... has.
        Dave
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ryan
        Currently, 5000+ hydrogen forklifts refuel at least once a day, everyday. There is already more hydrogen fueling infrastructure than supercharger infrastructure. However, neither the hydrogen infrastructure nor the superchargers are available to the general public, just corporations, and wealthy Tesla owners, respectively.
        Chris M
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ryan
        Tesla will likely have the supercharger network from coast to coast before there are enough H2 stations to go from one end of California to the other - and California has by far the most H2 stations.
      archos
      • 2 Years Ago
      Of course you get hydrogen from other sources, idiot. But you can't do it cheaply. This is a waste of time and money. If the government wants people using natural gas for fuel (a horrible idea in my opinion) then they should be pushing CNG and LPG stations. This just wastes more energy, puts more greenhouse gases and pollution in the air and in COMPLETELY INFERIOR to EVs in every sense. In 5 to 7 years battery capacity will eliminate range anxiety in cheaper models, eliminating the one miniscule advantage to hydrogen cars (if you can call it since hydrogen cars can't compete with gas cars either).
      2 wheeled menace
      • 2 Years Ago
      Sounds like a great allocation of resources for a company that is flailing..
      SublimeKnight
      • 2 Years Ago
      This is a great consortium. It allows companies to appear like they are investing in this dead end technology to placate the uneducated hippies, while not really having to waste much money individually.
        DaveMart
        • 2 Years Ago
        @SublimeKnight
        Where did you get the extraordinary notion that the likes of Honda and Toyota are NOT investing in fuel cell cars? The whinge from those who think they know better than most of the world's auto engineers and reckon that batteries alone will do the job is not that they are not spending on fuel cells, but that they are spending to much. You want to get your lines right to spread FUD properly - you are off message.
          archos
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DaveMart
          They're just playing with the money the DOE wastes on this gimmick tech, and reaping the benefits in patent rights gullible investors foolishly invest in them for.
          Joeviocoe
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DaveMart
          Dave, your interpretation of the word, "investing" is quite different from what is being discussed here. I have mentioned before that R&D money spent could be considered "Investing", yes. But it is a drop in the bucket, compared to serious money that would show their TRUE interest in FCVs. Just as automakers were not considered to be "investing" in EVs until they started a full volume production line (Nissan was the first).... FCV automakers have NOT yet started tooling factories or committed any serious resources. Just R&D, prototypes, demos, and lots of talk.
          DaveMart
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DaveMart
          archos: Apparently you do not realise that Honda and Toyota are both Japanese, and primarily deal with the Japanese governmental energy department, not the US DOE. Your inexpert opinion of the respective merits of fuel cells and hydrogen is no doubt interesting to yourself. Some of us prefer the opinions of the vast majority of automobile engineers, and authorities such as the DOE. They also have the advantage that they have provided massive studies to back their case, whereas you apparently feel that we should just take your word for it to the contrary.
      Letstakeawalk
      • 2 Years Ago
      Tesla is not a small start-up anymore. They are an established automaker, with a mature technology and established distribution, and they are now a publicly traded corporation.
      archos
      • 2 Years Ago
      Tesla is most definitely not an "established automaker". They are still very much a start up when it comes to mass produced cars. Its also pretty stupid to imply they aren't a start up because they have an IPO. If Toyota, GM, and Honda can't come out with hydrogen stations on a mass scale and can't come out with a hydrogen car as cheap as the Leaf by now THEY NEVER WILL. Its vaporware. But they have tons of fuel cell patents on the books that are assessed into their companies values, so we get more lies and press releases to keep gullible investors in the dark.
      Letstakeawalk
      • 2 Years Ago
      Here's some info from the US (from 2011): "Estimated 389 thousand metric tons of hydrogen annually produced from chlor‐alkali processes alone are equivalent to the annual fuel consumption consumption of 1 8.million million light‐duty hydrogen vehicles." http://www1.eere.energy.gov/hydrogenandfuelcells/pdfs/waste_cox.pdf
      krona2k
      • 2 Years Ago
      "Much of the waste hydrogen comes from chlor-alkali plants, and is simply vented into the atmosphere." So if hydrogen is so good how the hell is it still being vented into the atmosphere? Since it's never available without some expenditure of energy on earth it should always make sense to use an ICE hydrogen generator on-site to generate some electricity. Making use of 'waste' hydrogen on site makes sense, shipping it around for cars, not so much.
    • Load More Comments