Ever since Mission Motors first showed off its electric motorcycle technology demonstrator, the Mission R, a chorus of would-be riders have strongly suggested that it be made available for sale. That advice has finally been taken to heart with the creation of a new entity, Mission Motorcycles, and the announcement of the Mission RS and Mission R (above).

It makes total sense. Building and selling electric motorcycles was, after all, the underlying premise of the company at its founding. When its original Yves Behar design, the Mission One, didn't achieve enough demand, however, the company switched gears (as it were) and decided to concentrate on drivetrain development. It was during this time it built the original Mission R that this future product will be based on. Read on for all the details.


The Mission RS is a drool-worthy replica of the bike that set the electric lap record at Laguna Seca on its way to winning the only TTXGP event it was ever entered in. Limited to 40 examples, it has the same drivetrain with 163 horsepower and 120 pound feet of torque to zip you up to 150 miles per hour as the more-affordable R model, but features an Öhlins FGRT fork and BST carbon fiber wheels. RS buyers will also receive the first deliveries, special "early adopter" perks and a "one-on-one VIP rider training experience". That might come in handy as the so-called MissionOS touchscreen interface has a ton of features, including telemetry, navigation, tunable controls and a "track mode". There's even an integrated image-stablized HD camera involved.

The $58,999 (before federal and/or state tax incentives) RS is outfitted with a 17 kilowatt-hour (kWh) battery that the company says should be good for 230 city miles or 140 miles of a 50/50 city/interstate-speed blend. With an optional second charger, it can suck up all the electrons it can handle in under two hours.

If that price tag is a bit much for you, the R starts at a much more reasonable $32,499. The deposit is also half the size of the $10,000 required for the RS. It comes with a 12 kWh battery – there are optional 15 and 17 kWh packages also available – and still features fully adjustable Öhlins suspension bits and Brembo brakes.

You can check out the official press release below along with a short promotional video. As a bonus we've also included footage of a full Steve-Rapp lap around the famed Laguna Seca circuit. Enjoy!




Show full PR text
SPEED AT ITS PUREST: MISSION MOTORCYCLES LAUNCHES RS AND R MODELS, STARTING AT $29,999

The redefinition of two-wheeled speed starts now, as Mission Motorcycles proudly opens sales of the world's most innovative, technologically advanced, zero emissions electric superbikes to the public.

"The motorcycle industry seems to have stagnated, where the biggest headlines are filled with the smallest of improvements. Only by combining the cleanest expression of raw power, provided by an electric powertrain, with the connectivity we've come to expect, can anyone truly evolve the motorcycle into the 21st century. And this is precisely our goal" says Mission Motorcycles President, Mark Seeger.

Two models -- both designed, built, and assembled in the USA -- are now available: the limited-edition race-proven Mission RS, and the highly configurable Mission R. Both models are based on the architecture of the breakthrough race bike built by Mission Motors that dominated the FIM/TTXGP race at Laguna Seca in 2011.

Mission Motorcycles is the result of a partnership between Mission Motors, developer of the record-setting prototype, and Mark Seeger, known for creating successful, innovation-focused businesses that match perfect products to insatiable demand.

When asked about the partnership, Jit Bhattacharya, President of Mission Motors responded: "For two years, riders were demanding that we bring the Mission race bike to market. And for two years, we disappointed them. Today, through this partnership with Mark Seeger and the talented team at Mission Motorcycles, the wait is over."

The Mission RS and Mission R are powered by state-of-the-art electric powertrain technology from Mission Motors. The custom Mission Motorcycles InfiniteDrive™ powertrain delivers a quality of speed -- and sound -- unlike anything the motorcycling world has known. From low rotational inertia to instantly available power, the package offers an incredibly pure riding experience. Both models from Mission Motorcycles will feature the MissionOS™ -- the world's first internet-connected motorcycle information system, comprising turn-by-turn directions, integrated HD camera with telemetry overlay, wireless HUD integration, and more.

Extremely limited, only 40 of the race-proven Mission RS will be produced -- one for each second of the lead that the Mission prototype had over the field at Laguna Seca's FIM/TTXGP finish line. Prices for the RS begin at $56,499 after a Federal tax credit. Meanwhile, prices for the cutting-edge Mission R begin at $29,999 after a Federal tax credit. Both machines boast sub 3-second 0-to-60 mph acceleration, 150 mph top speeds, and ranges of up to 140 miles.

Reservations for the Mission RS and Mission R can be made on the company's website: www.mission-motorcycles.com

Models & Availability:

Mission Motorcycles kicks off 2013 with two available product lines: The Mission RS and the Mission R.

The Mission RS is a premium-spec street-legal iteration of the Mission Motors prototype that won the Laguna Seca FIM/TTXGP. As Mission Motorcycle's halo product, production is extremely limited to just 40 editions. The production RS is an enhanced, street-legal version equipped with Öhlins FGRT forks and BST carbon fiber wheels. Additional details on the component packages available to augment the Mission RS are available online. The Mission RS will be delivered with a 140-mile combined cycle range battery and retails for $56,499 after a $2,500 Federal tax credit.

The Mission R will be delivered with Öhlins RT suspension, Brembo monobloc calipers, and Marchesini forged aluminum wheels. Customers will be able to configure the Mission R with one of three battery packages: 12 kWh, 15 kWh, or 17 kWh with 105 mile, 120 mile, and 140 mile respective combined cycle ranges. Pricing for the Mission R starts at $29,999, including $2,500 Federal tax credit.

Both models are available immediately for customer reservation. With a proprietary chassis designed by James Parker -- and the custom Mission Motorcycles InfiniteDrive™ powertrain that provides over 160 hp -- both Mission superbikes are capable of sub 3-second 0-to-60 acceleration times and over 150 mph top speeds. The Mission RS and Mission R also feature the MissionOS™, the world's first internet-connected motorcycle information system, featuring turn-by-turn directions, track specific mode, integrated HD camera with telemetry overlay, wireless HUD integration, and more.

Mission Motorcycles will deliver the Mission RS beginning in Summer 2014 and the Mission R following delivery of all limited-edition models.

Further Information:
To learn more about the Mission RS and the Mission R, please visit
www.mission-motorcycles.com
For additional updates, please follow facebook.com/missionmotorcyclesinc and twitter.com/missionmcycles


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 24 Comments
      Ricardo Gozinya
      • 1 Year Ago
      To all the people trying to crap on this bike: This thing is fast. Really fast. Part of the decision to make 40 of the RS is because that's how many seconds it beat its competitors by at Laguna Seca. A couple of years ago Mission was already getting lap times on par with SuperSports, something no other electric is even close to doing yet. Not MotoCzysz, not Mugen, not Lightning, definitely not Brammo or Zero. And for those trying to compare it to the Tesla Roadster, this thing would destroy the Tesla, both in the straights and the corners. Yes, it's expensive, so what? Teslas are expensive too, insanely expensive. Yet many around these parts fall all over themselves to kiss Elon Musk's ass. And it's not as if the price difference is that different from other low volume bikes. Look at the price of the Motus MST, the EBR 1190RS, or anything from Confederate.
        mustang_sallad
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Ricardo Gozinya
        I think this bike is awesome, and it'll find enough buyers at that price. But while the Tesla Roadster was fairly expensive compared to an equivalent gas car, the Model S is arguably not much more expensive at all compared to its internal combustion competitors.
      • 1 Year Ago
      That thing sounds like something out of Star Wars. Cool, but pricey.
      Aaron Mosley
      • 1 Year Ago
      I been wating on this! but DAMN 60K? ok they start at 30k but DAMN 60k
      Dave D
      • 1 Year Ago
      We're getting updates on "EV sales" for cars....it would be nice to see how EV bikes are doing as well. I think as an entry level way to go electric, we might be surprised at how robust those sales could be and we're missing it in our tallies. I know it's not apples to apples in car sales, but in this case it could be making the people take the electric plunge and we're not giving it credit.
        jameshouk
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Dave D
        $33K is "entry level" for a motorcycle. What planet do you live on?
        raktmn
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Dave D
        Since they are only going to make 40 of the RS model as a limited edition, I don't know how significant RS sales would be in the overall count of EV's. It would be interesting to see how many "R" models they will sell though. In my opinion, EV motorcycles are about a year or two behind EV cars in general, so any comparison to EV car sales will reflect that. Zero and Brammo started by putting out commuter bikes that really weren't interstate ready. I put them halfway between an NEV and a Leaf. From what I understand, sales were more like NEV sales than Leaf sales. I think if you were going to compare early Zero and Brammo sales, it would be better to compare them with NEV sales (I don't think NEV sales show up in any tallies here either?) Now with Zero and Brammo's latest 2013 EV's, they are now interstate capable bikes for short interstate runs, but are still for local driving like a Leaf. I would categorize these 2013's as being sort of like a high performance edition of a Leaf in capabilities. So I am expecting sales to pick up similar to how EV car sales picked up when the Leaf came out in 2011 compared to NEV sales. I would categorize the Mission RS as about at the level of about a 40 kW Tesla Roadster. (Yea, I know that Tesla doesn't make one of those, but if they did, that would be where I think the Mission would fit in.) So a limited run of 40 would compare to Tesla's limited run of Roadsters.
          raktmn
          • 1 Year Ago
          @raktmn
          protomech, Yup, that sounds about right. Total 2011 EV sales were about 17K, and total 2012 EV sales were 53K for all models. That puts 2012 E-Moto sales at right around the 25x ratio compared to late 2011/early 2012 sales levels. So roughly a little less than a year behind. I see 2012 as the transition year for EV's with Brammo and Zero bringing full highway E-Moto's to market the same way 2011 was the transition year for bring the Volt and Leaf to market.
          protomech
          • 1 Year Ago
          @raktmn
          Cars sell about 25x the rate of motorcycles in the US. Zero was really the only EV bike manufacturer selling bikes in the US in 2012, and they claimed about a thousand unit sales, most of which are in the US. http://www.cyclenews.com/370/20674/Racing-Article/First-Ride--2013-Zero-Electric-Motorcycles.aspx Compare to 23k Chevy Volts sold in the US in 2012, and 9k Nissan Leafs.
        methos1999
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Dave D
        Careful, you'll get the trolls criticizing you that this "autoblog" not "motorcycle blog". But I agree with you. I'd particularly like tallies on Zero & Brammo, as those are the two brands closest to mass market.
      SpikedLemon
      • 1 Year Ago
      Looks nice but 140miles of "50/50 mixed" driving down from 230miles of city driving is a serious dent in the overall range. I cringe to think what it'd be pure highway or blasting around on the side roads. In the end: a motorcycle is an emotional purchase. This is entirely different from a car that could be considered an "applicance" for commuting (with conventional second car). It looks cool but the practicality of such short range is crippling on a motorcycle. It looks to be entirely purported for owners of multiple conventional motorcycles to make up for this bike's shortcomings. Perhaps there are enough that are willing to give this a try... But until the mileage/charging is remedied: it's not for me.
        protomech
        • 1 Year Ago
        @SpikedLemon
        Pure 70 mph highway will be around 100 miles.
        m_2012
        • 1 Year Ago
        @SpikedLemon
        140 mile range on a bike is damn good. Try to get that raging on a 1000cc bike with half the torque of this.
          Randy, Ran,RatedR,
          • 1 Year Ago
          @m_2012
          actually i get about 200 miles of straight highway on my zx-10 you have to have good mapping and a nonstock exhaust
        SAM
        • 1 Year Ago
        @SpikedLemon
        This is basically the motorcycle equivalent to the Tesla Roadster; i.e. relatively exclusive, relatively limited range, but very fast. For me personally, most of my fun weekend rides are right around 100-120miles which consists of about half canyons and half highway. This bike would be perfect for me. It'd make my 5 mile daily commute to work a lot of fun too; I live in LA, so it's basically year-round riding season.
          Dave R
          • 1 Year Ago
          @SAM
          This bike is even more impressive than the Roadster, IMO - simply because the Roadster is showing it's age already. If the Roadster were delivered today built on Tesla's improved technology as used in the Model S, it'd be faster, lighter and handle better.
          Randy, Ran,RatedR,
          • 1 Year Ago
          @SAM
          This bike is trash i hate to say it but it looks beautiful, but lets not compare it to the tesla because its not on that level the tesla is fast and luxurious along with beautiful amongst its peers, this bike is not fast amongst its peers its actually very slow its got the top speed of a 500cc bike and its has the weight of a 1300 cc bike thats horrible, secondly its quiet thats the worst thing you can have is a quiet bike the louder the better so vehicles can hear you, but this bike is a step in the right direction although I would get a Ducati 1199 Panigale S Tricolore - 2013 at and save 20 grand
      John
      • 1 Year Ago
      It sounds like a dentist's drill.
      Jon
      • 1 Year Ago
      Wow. 17 kWh on a bike. Impressive packaging. I wonder how much it weighs.
        Dave R
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Jon
        Yeah, no kidding. That's as much battery as is used on the Volt and iMiEV.
        raktmn
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Jon
        Mission hasn't released official weights yet for any of these, but based on the actual race bike, it should be somewhere around approx. 550 lbs or so for the RS.
      marv.shocker
      • 1 Year Ago
      To each his own, but personally i don't see the point in electric motorcycles...not yet, anyway. When you've already got bikes that can turn mid-9 second ETs right off the showroom floor and can be ridden anywhere, why do we need electric bikes with limited range? Not to mention the complete lack of wonderful noise from a 14,000 rpm inline four...but again, to each his own.
        masteraq
        • 1 Year Ago
        @marv.shocker
        Lack of noise? Clearly you didn't watch the second video.
        Betelgeuse Orion
        • 1 Year Ago
        @marv.shocker
        Noise? are you one of those fools that think noise is actually useful? noise is WASTED ENERGY, it makes you go slower, it robs you of power.
    • Load More Comments
    Advertisement
    2015 Ford Mustang
    MSRP: $23,800 - $46,170
    2015 Jeep Cherokee
    MSRP: $22,995 - $30,795
    2015 Subaru Forester
    MSRP: $22,195 - $33,095
    2015 Honda Accord
    MSRP: $22,105 - $33,630
    2015 Toyota Highlander
    MSRP: $29,665 - $44,040
    Advertisement