One Illinois-based company is taking the "slow and steady wins the race" approach to public plug-in vehicle chargers. Telefonix, which has specialized in making retractable cord reels largely used in the aviation industry, is looking to drum up interest in its L1 Power Post, which is what the company says will be the first Level 1 charging station designed for public use, according to Plug In Cars.

Level 1 systems, which run on the same 120-volt current as US households and uses the standard SAE J1772 connector, only add about six miles of range per hour of charging to a typical EV. More importantly, the L1 Power Post, which Telefonix recently showed off at a Florida conference, will cost about $1,500. That's about 25 percent of what many public Level 2, 240-volt chargers cost, although those add as many as 25 miles of range in an hour.

Telefonix, which has been in operations for about a quarter century, is banking on cash-conscious public and private entities to buy its systems, noting that a Level 1 charging station at a workplace will still provide more than enough juice during a typical workday to get many EV drivers home. Telefonix notes that hotels and airports are other places that wouldn't require the speed of a Level 2 charger in most situations.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 25 Comments
      Giza Plateau
      • 2 Days Ago
      Rotation, it's a classic idiot's response to insist that a comment isn't valid unless you start a company to prove it. Please stop saying stupid stuff like that. It should be possible for you to understand simple things without having to commit years of my life to doing a production company.
      Rotation
      • 2 Days Ago
      I looked, this is 16A capable. About 1800W output. That's how they get the charge rates they claim (up to 6 miles per hour, depending on car). Phil of evseupgrade says the 6kW LEAF (2013) does up to 27A on 110V charging!
      Spec
      • 2 Days Ago
      You guys are missing the point. You are not paying that money for the wire, you are paying that money for a ruggedized system to install outdoors for public charging. A system that can handle abuse, bad weather, vandalism, etc.
      Spec
      • 1 Year Ago
      These would be great for workplaces, airports, and other places that you park for a long time. States should offer incentives to get employers to install these.
        VL00
        • 2 Days Ago
        @Spec
        No, and no. Waste of time. As EV packs get larger, this makes even less sense.
          Rotation
          • 2 Days Ago
          @VL00
          Spec: A 6A 208V charger draws less electricity than a 12A 120V charger. And it can be wired up more simply and cheaply with three phase power. I agree the cheapness of this station is a factor. I just think someone should make a low-capacity 208V charger which is the same or similar price because the install costs would be lower.
          Spec
          • 2 Days Ago
          @VL00
          EV packs will probably not get very much bigger. And you are missing many of the good points for this system: -Often 240V is not available w/o a lot of additional wiring work whereas a small 120V line may be available to be tapped into. -Facilities may prefer to only have 120V so they can offer free charging without it costing them much in electricity. -At work you have at least 8 hours of charging time and at airports, you may have several days . . . 120V gives you plenty of charging. -Having this cheap allows more of them to be installed. -Comparisons to many inexpensive 240V EVSEs are off because this is a ruggedized outdoor system with a retractable cord. It is meant for public use, not a personal charger.
          Rotation
          • 2 Days Ago
          @VL00
          This has nothing to do with the size of EV packs really. Measuring charge rates in turns of pack percentage is to lose track of the fact that you charge so you can drive, not so you can enjoy the warmth of a full pack. The key figures are really the miles added per unit time charging, which is determined by the efficiency of the vehicle and the power provided.
      Giza Plateau
      • 1 Year Ago
      1500$ for an extension cord. It's a steal.
        Rotation
        • 2 Days Ago
        @Giza Plateau
        If this stuff is so overpriced, they must have amazing profit margins. So why don't you stop complaining and get into the market? You can surely charge $1300, capture a huge percentage of the market and clean up!
      MTN RANGER
      • 2 Days Ago
      Even if you go the cheapest route and do an openEVSE, you still have to pay about $300-400 in parts. The biggest cost is the J1772 plug and heavy gauge copper cable. http://code.google.com/p/open-evse/wiki/OpenEVSEv42partslist http://code.google.com/p/open-evse/wiki/Ordering
      JakeY
      • 1 Year Ago
      "You can surely charge $1300, capture a huge percentage of the market and clean up!" Not necessarily. It may be so overpriced that the market is extremely small! $1.5k for a L1 sounds ridiculous to me when you can get L2 for less.
      carney373
      • 1 Year Ago
      If this product takes off, there are going to be a LOT of stranded, seriously pissed-off drivers accustomed to level 2 charging speeds when out in public. Unless the charger clearly and in big BIG print says only 6 miles of travel per hour of charge.
      Rotation
      • 2 Days Ago
      I like to think of myself as a neoclassic idiot. I do understand simple things. You don't. I think if you actually tried to make a competing product you would notice that it does actually cost more than you think to produce these and thus your "glorified extension cord" statements are not only incorrect but boring to see repeated. So I held out hope that you might bite and start a company and then after you learned something, stop posting this dumb stuff. But instead you just called me an idiot. Spec: Agreed, people saying that you can get a $1300 L2 instead of a $1500 L1 are missing the bigger point. This thing is built to be outside and remain there unattended.
      David Murray
      • 1 Year Ago
      Not a bad idea for workplace charging. Some advantages are that you can in many cases use existing wiring. Also you could charge twice as many cars for the same amount of power. 8 hours (a typical workday) is enough to completely refill a Chevy Volt even if it is totally drained.
        Dave R
        • 2 Days Ago
        @David Murray
        Yeah, this is great for workplace and apartment charging where you typically park long enough to get a substantial charge. Typical L2 station is 208-240V/30A, so typical L1 at 120V/12A could charge as many as 5 cars with the same amount of power - just what you need when you have a high concentration of cars parked for long periods of time. I would hope that this would actually be capable of at least 16A - that would encourage more cars to come capable of taking full advantage of common 16A outlets which is a nice 30% improvement in speed even though only Teslas can really take advantage of the extra 4 amps. OK, looking at the spec sheet this is capable of 120V/16A, so that will make Tesla owners happy.
      VL00
      • 2 Days Ago
      The Voltec Level 2 outdoor rated charger is $490. So yes, its overpriced.
      John Hansen
      • 1 Year Ago
      Even at 110, I would love to have this at work or at an airport. It would probably barely be adequate at a hotel, since you wouldn't be able to completely charge even a Leaf overnight. If the price were super cheap, I would understand, but how does it compare to this 220v outdoor pedestal charger from Schneider? It's the same price and appears to do the same thing. The one advantage I see of the L1 station is the retractable cord. That would be really nice. For the price though I would think most people would opt for the Schneider. Am I missing some feature of the L1 that makes it a better value? More durable maybe?
        paulwesterberg
        • 2 Days Ago
        @John Hansen
        The "feature" of level 1 is that you can offer "free charging" at your "eco-friendly" business without having to pay very much for the electricity. Anybody with half a brain would install a cheaper level 2 charger. But there are a lot of brainless middle mangers out there so this might have a market.
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