Vital Stats

Engine:
4.2L V8
Power:
450 HP / 317 LB-FT
Transmission:
7-Speed Auto
0-60 Time:
4.9 Seconds
Top Speed:
174 MPH
Drivetrain:
All-Wheel Drive
Curb Weight:
4,420 LBS
Seating:
2+2
Cargo:
10.2 CU-FT
MPG:
16 City / 22 HWY
Base Price:
$77,900
The Audi RS5 is a bit of an odd duck in the brand's US lineup. At the moment it is one of only two RS models – the other being the TT RS – atop a pyramid of A and higher-performing S models. It is not, however, the brand's flagship performance model – not even close – that space being occupied by variants of the R8 supercar, specifically the V10 and GT models, and upcoming 560-horsepower RS7.

The RS5 does, however, owe its beating heart to those ten-cylinder R8s, its own 4.2-liter V8 almost identical to those engines save for two fewer cylinders. Outside of the R8, then, the RS5 is the lone bastion of naturally aspirated V8 power in a brand that once happily shoved 4.2-liter V8s under any hood that they would fit. Today, not even the giant Q7 SUV offers a V8. Lastly, the RS5 is not new, except to us, having been on sale in Europe in coupe form the last couple of years.

While Europeans were able to enjoy the hardtop two-door without us, the RS5 Cabriolet is reaching both peoples around the same time: now. We reviewed the RS5 coupe just recently, and having spent some time with the tin-top model myself as well, here is my take on the droptop version of what I consider one of Audi's most interesting models.

Driving Notes
  • West Coast Editor Michael Harley likened the RS5 coupe to a supermodel. The metaphor survives intact when driving around with the RS5 Cabriolet's top down – it's like walking around town with a topless supermodel on your arm. The attention this car receives is surprising considering most people don't blink twice at a standard A5 or S5. I received thumbs up, waves and shout-outs from kids on bikes, one grown man in an Escalade and an entire Burger King cook staff.
  • This can partly be explained by the RS5's aggressive styling accoutrements that include wider fenders; 20-inch wheels housing attention-grabbing "wave" rotors; a giant, single-frame honeycomb grille; oversized air inlets and a noticeable rear diffuser. The other reason is that it's rare; only 1,200 RS5 coupes have been sold in the US since last summer, and the Cabriolet has only just arrived.
  • Some argue that the RS5 isn't worth the extra $18,000 over the cost of an S5. The RS5 Cabriolet doesn't help itself in this regard with a base price of $77,900 – some $18,600 more than an S5 Cabriolet. This one was loaded up with the optional Estoril Blue crystal effect paint and black roof ($1,075), MMI Navigation plus package ($3,450), Driver Assist package with adaptive cruise control, dynamic steering and side assist ($3,250), Sport exhaust with black finishers ($1,000), 20-inch five-spoke wheels with summer tires ($1,000) and Matte-Aluminum Optic package ($750) for a grand total $88,425, not including an $895 destination charge.
  • I don't buy the above argument that the RS5 fails to justify its price premium. That's what people who reach to afford an S5 tell themselves, and they're right in that case: Settling for the S5 is smarter than raiding your retirement account for the RS5. But the RS5 is the better of the two, and if the $18k difference between them is less than a rounding error on your tax refund, then pay Audi's premium for owning the best and enjoy.
  • I would reach to cover that $18k difference just to own one of the last and best examples of Audi's amazing 4.2-liter V8. Variants of this eight-cylinder have occupied engine bays all across the Audi and Volkswagen brands since the early '90s, but are now being replaced by a supercharged 3.0-liter V6 and, when more power is needed, a twin-turbo 4.0-liter V8. The two remaining 4.2-liter V8s belong to the R8 and RS5, though they're far from the same engine. From what we've been able to cobble together of Audi's engine lineage, the R8's standard engine is a high-revving version of the 32-valve V8 that was initially used in the Q7. That engine was eventually upgraded with more advanced mechanicals and engine controls and modified to become the 5.2-liter V10 used in the last generations of the S6 and S8. The RS5's 4.2-liter V8 is a version of that V10 but with two fewer cylinders, making it closely related to but more advanced and powerful than the R8's older 4.2-liter V8.
  • This engine revs like something with four fewer cylinders, which is fortunate considering how many revs are required to reach its high-for-a-V8 redline of 8,500 rpm. With all 450 horsepower not fully realized until 8,250 rpm and just 317 pound-feet of torque available from 4,000-6,000 rpm, you'll be working the 4.2-liter V8 hard to enjoy its full potential, but it's worth it when you hear the optional Sport exhaust system's baffles barking with every downshift in Dynamic mode. When not being worked, the RS5's engine reveals its ancestry as a luxury motor, quietly and effortlessly going about its job.
  • I generally prefer coupes to convertibles, but the RS5 Cabriolet is an effective champion of topless motoring. Raising and lowering the roof is a simple single-button affair that takes no more than 20 seconds to go up or down and can be done while on the move at low speeds. A separate button, meanwhile, raises and lowers all of the side glass. The situation that won me over was cruising along a two-lane state route after the sun had dipped below the horizon but the air was still warm in the breeze. Messed up hair be damned, that was fun. While wind noise was obviously higher with the roof stowed, I was still able to carry on a phone conversation over Bluetooth.
  • Would I choose the RS5 Cabriolet over the RS5 coupe? Sadly, no. While I would happily pay for the joys of the RS5 over the more affordable S5, the $9,000 premium required for the convertible is one that's too dear considering my proclivity for coupes. That, however, is a subjective judgment call we all make when faced with the decision of coupe or convertible. The real question lies outside the Audi fold, where BMW and Mercedes-Benz offer equally compelling, powerful and expensive convertibles.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 53 Comments
      Scooter
      • 1 Year Ago
      The front end is something to be adored. Big RS5 fan, but I never liked the cab' version. The soft top makes the body look block-like. In my opinion the body isn't "right" for a soft top.
      ravenosa
      • 1 Year Ago
      Crazy to think, for $90k and it's slower than a base WRX, especially considering how generic it looks. Makes the Camry Solara look like a pretty exciting convertible, still has the Civic look from the rear. But no doubt the materials are nice - and if you want people to know you have money, it's probably a decent status symbol (if a bit generic looking). I'm sure Audi fanboys are going to love it...
        k_m94
        • 1 Year Ago
        @ravenosa
        >slower than a base WRX Nope. >Generic looking Nope. >Makes the Camry Solara look exciting Nope. >Civic look from the rear Nope. >Materials are nice Yep. >If you want people to know you have money, it's a decent status symbol Yep. >Audi fanboys are going to love it Yep. 3/7 Your comment failed.
      davis
      • 1 Year Ago
      I don't know why anyone will buy Audi cars? Audi cars are ordinary car like others, but Audi dealers will lie to their customers making them think that it is the most Luxurious car in the market by selling for higher price and before you buy it they will advice you that Audi car retain its value. Big Big liesssss. i had an horrible experience with stockpot Audi UK after they corn me to take home silly Audi A5 without a Job.....Please don't believe anything their car sales person said to you.
        72CJ5driver
        • 1 Year Ago
        @davis
        If you bought any new car while unemployed, I doubt the dealer had to work that hard to fool you into buying an Audi.
        Hello, Brian
        • 1 Year Ago
        @davis
        And you blame Audi for this? I will file your opinion appropriately.
        libertedelacroix
        • 1 Year Ago
        @davis
        Try not typing drunk, you might make more sense.
      Hernan
      • 1 Year Ago
      It looks dated. Inside and out.
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
      Jay
      • 1 Year Ago
      I find it interesting how non-photogenic this car is but when you see it in person it causes you to turn your head and stare. It's a beautiful car in person and the design will age very well.
      Shahul X
      • 1 Year Ago
      Remember when the S2000 was being called overweight when it was 2800 lbs??? crazy world now when under 4000 lbs is considered ok for a sports car
        Shahul X
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Shahul X
        and over 4000 can be called "sporty"
        thenewrick
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Shahul X
        This isn't a sports car merely a fun-based versatile DD/GT car with a sporty package.
      Finklestein
      • 1 Year Ago
      I can't believe this is a 80k (90k at tested) car. With that kind of money, you can get yourself into plenty of cars that will not just tickle your desire for sporty driving; they will smash it with an iron sledgehammer.
        jtav2002
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Finklestein
        And you can spend more money on even slower cars, what's your point?
      SLR722GT
      • 1 Year Ago
      The RS5 is a good car but I just don't know why anyone would walk away from an M3 over this car.
        Hello, Brian
        • 1 Year Ago
        @SLR722GT
        Because style matters to them, they don\'t attend track days, and they don\'t want \"the one that everyone else has.\"
        Hernan
        • 1 Year Ago
        @SLR722GT
        Quattro is a big difference, important to some.
          SLR722GT
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Hernan
          That still makes no difference. This car is too overpriced, and understeers too much. M3 is still a better car.
          Eduardo Maal
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Hernan
          Even with Quattro, the M3 kicks its ass.
        jtav2002
        • 1 Year Ago
        @SLR722GT
        Track numbers aren't the sole buying requirement for a lot of people. Most M3's I see are doing 55 on the highway in the slow lane. I'm sure the RS5 would do that just as well.
          superchan7
          • 1 Year Ago
          @jtav2002
          I thought most M3s are doing 80 and cutting people off? But that's true of Audi S4s too. Seriously guys, the "sharper-handling" car isn't always a better car. It depends on what people want, and it's hard to deny the A5 coupe has a more striking appearance than the 3 coupe. When someone, even a sports car lover, is at the point of being able to actually afford one, his priorities change. Some insist on the impractical sports car and stick with it, as I have. Many others want a comfortable commute and start to compromise.
      1STH
      • 1 Year Ago
      this is such a poorly written article, that i can't even get myself to read more than the 1st paragraph. Appalling.
        thenewrick
        • 1 Year Ago
        @1STH
        It's just too much info in too small a space. It's not appalling. Just pace yourself a bit and lengthen your thoughts Neff!
        • 1 Year Ago
        @1STH
        [blocked]
        J
        • 1 Year Ago
        @1STH
        It didn't get much better.
      thenewrick
      • 1 Year Ago
      I'd love to have one of these but they're more difficult to tune and more expensive to maintain compared to a BMW. Automatic-only is the nail in the coffin for me though.
      Eta Carinae
      • 1 Year Ago
      lipstick on a topless oprah ?
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