Chevrolet has officially dropped power figures for the 2014 Corvette Stingray. The sports car's 6.2-liter V8 can crank out up to 460 horsepower at 6,000 rpm and 465 pound-feet of torque at 4,000 rpm. Most of the torque, up to 316 lb-ft, is available from just 1,000 rpm, and wide open the LT1 V8 produces just 5 lb-ft less than the outgoing LS7 in the Z06. Mercy.

Using the standard exhaust, the engine yields 455 hp and 460 lb-ft of torque. Chevrolet estimates that's good enough to get the 2014 Corvette to 60 miles per hour in under four seconds. Even with all that thrust on hand, Chevy says the LT1 is more efficient than ever. Active Fuel Management, direct injection and variable valve timing help cut emissions by 25 percent.

In addition, engineers threw a spate of advancements at the mill, including four-into-one exhaust manifolds, a new intake manifold design and an oil system with piston squirters to keep the cylinders cool under hard use. The system also allows for an available dry-sump oiling system. Check out the full press release below for more information. You can also click through the massive gallery for all the smallblock porn you can handle.
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2014 Corvette Stingray Cranks Out 460 Horsepower

SAE certifications confirm new Corvette has most powerful standard engine ever

2013-05-28

DETROIT – The 2014 Corvette Stingray's all-new LT1 6.2L V-8 engine is SAE-certified at 460 horsepower (343 kW) at 6,000 rpm and 465 lb-ft of torque (630 Nm) at 4,600 rpm, with the available performance exhaust system, Chevrolet announced today.

The Stingray is SAE-certified at 455 horsepower (339 kW) and 460 lb-ft (624 Nm) with the standard exhaust system. They are the highest standard power ratings ever for the Corvette, delivered with efficiency that is expected to exceed 26 mpg on the highway.

"The 2014 Corvette Stingray's LT1 engine is a triumph of advanced technology, delivering more power and torque than ever before with greater efficiency," said Jordan Lee, Small Block chief engineer.

"The LT1's performance complements the Corvette's low mass with a tremendous feeling of power that builds as the rpm climbs. Drivers will experience more power and acceleration than ever before with the standard engine – in fact, its power and torque surpass many uplevel engines offered by competitors."

At 74 horsepower per liter, the LT1 has greater power density than the C6 Corvette's LS3 6.2L engine and even the C6 Z06's racing-derived 7.0L LS7. It also produces comparable torque to the LS7 – up to 4,700 rpm – and its peak torque is within 5 lb-ft of the 7.0L engine. That torque is generated early and sustained across the rpm band, with 316 lb-ft available at only 1,000 rpm and 90 percent of peak torque available from 3,000 rpm to 5,500 rpm – giving the lightweight Corvette Stingray excellent acceleration at all speeds.

Chevrolet estimates the Corvette will run from 0 to 60 mph in less than four seconds.

The new LT1 engine's high output, and high power density and efficiency are due to several advanced technologies, including direct injection, Active Fuel Management and continuously variable valve timing, which support an advanced combustion system.

Direct injection is a primary contributor to the engine's combustion efficiency, ensuring a more complete burn of the fuel in the air-fuel mixture. That's achieved by precisely controlling the mixture motion and fuel injection spray pattern. Direct injection also keeps the combustion chamber cooler, which allows for a higher compression ratio. Emissions are also reduced, particularly cold-start hydrocarbon emissions, which are cut by about 25 percent.

Active Fuel Management, or cylinder deactivation, is a first-ever application on Corvette. It helps save fuel by imperceptibly shutting down half of the engine's cylinders in light-load driving. Continuously variable valve timing is refined to support the LT1 AFM and direct injection systems to further optimize performance, efficiency and emissions.

These technologies support the all-new, advanced combustion system, which incorporates a new cylinder-head design and a new, sculpted piston design that is an integral contributor to the high-compression, mixture motion parameters enabled by direct injection.

Additional engine features include:

Advanced oiling system with oil-spray piston cooling and available dry-sump oiling
Engine-mounted, camshaft-driven fuel pump to support the direct injection system
Intake manifold with "runners in a box" design that allows for high-efficiency airflow packaged beneath the Corvette's low hood line
High-flow, four-into-one exhaust manifolds based on the design of the LS7 engine.
Small Block legacy

The 2014 Corvette Stingray's LT1 engine is the fifth generation of the Small Block engine family, which debuted in the Corvette in 1955. It displaced 4.3L (265 cubic inches) and was rated at 195 horsepower, drawing air and fuel through a four-barrel carburetor. Five years later, Small Block power helped Corvette secure its first victory at the 24 Hours of Le Mans.

In 2012, the Small Block-powered Corvette Racing C6.R beat Ferrari, BMW and Porsche to sweep the drivers', team, and manufacturer championships in production-based American Le Mans Series GT class. These championships make Corvette Racing the most successful team in ALMS history, with a total of 77 class wins, eight drivers' championships, and nine manufacturer and team championships since 2001.

The 2014 Corvette Stingray coupe goes on sale this fall, with a convertible following by the end of the year – each sharing an all-new aluminum frame structure and enhanced chassis, as well as completely new exterior and interior designs.

# # #

About Chevrolet
Founded in 1911 in Detroit, Chevrolet is now one of the world's largest car brands, doing business in more than 140 countries and selling more than 4.5 million cars and trucks a year. Chevrolet provides customers with fuel-efficient vehicles that feature spirited performance, expressive design, and high quality. More information on Chevrolet models can be found at www.chevrolet.com.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 115 Comments
      Thipps
      • 1 Year Ago
      the most impressive aspect to me is its torque curve. This thing builds massive power way lower in the RPM range then even the LS7. Its crazy to think this car is going to be 52k and this is the base version...
        jawnath1n
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Thipps
        "This thing builds massive power way lower in the RPM range then even the LS7." I'm not sure I follow. Can you elaborate? They make similar torque up to 4700~rpm and at that point, the LS7 runs away and makes more torque/power throughout the rest of the RPM band. How would an engine with similar torque at a given RPM make more power than another engine?.
          Thipps
          • 1 Year Ago
          @jawnath1n
          YES they make similar torque....But its apples to oranges. the new base LT-1 makes almost as much torque as the outgoing LS7. Thats huge. Also @Jawnath the LT-1's torque doesnt drop off it just flattens out. you want your torque curve to be flat. Dont look at it as you are loosing torque at the top end but you gained tons of torque down low (usable power). Unless you like video game peak stats this engine is going to be a monster, its cheap and im sure its bullet proof
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Thipps
        [blocked]
          • 1 Year Ago
          [blocked]
          oRenj9
          • 1 Year Ago
          AWD would be stupid on a Corvette.
          Brandon
          • 1 Year Ago
          I accidentally put an it, sorry.
          Brandon
          • 1 Year Ago
          All right we get the point, but you don't have to keep posting the same crap it on every article about a rwd only car that autoblog posts.
        montoym
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Thipps
        Larger displacement certainly has its advantages.
      Eta Carinae
      • 1 Year Ago
      cant wait for the ZR1 to come out....rumors are saying it will hit close or above to 700HP.........jesus GM........jesus
      crshcrstr
      • 1 Year Ago
      316 lb-ft from just 1000rpm? Not a gm man myself, but that's pretty respectable.
      bookemd
      • 1 Year Ago
      Well done GM Performance Division. I would assume another 250 or so for the next ZR1, that will be Epic.
      Bobby Tiger MacRae
      • 1 Year Ago
      Good! Now stick it in the Camaro!
      Hazdaz
      • 1 Year Ago
      Awesome performance numbers so far.... can't wait to see some cool videos. I am very curious what kind of mileage numbers this engine will get as well.
      Jonathan Brown
      • 1 Year Ago
      Amazing achievement. That small block Chevy engine is continually impressing me. The power output..the ability to have such a low hoodline....the cost to buy... Another big win for corvette enthusiasts around the globe.. Make mine torch red with a black interior with Z51, MRC and NPP and I'm good to go... When the competition seats hit...add that to the option list... Should still be right around 60 grand... Thanks for the great report.
        The Wasp
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Jonathan Brown
        "the ability to have such a low hoodline" I know what you're trying to say but that is a terribly awkward way to say it.
      Porsche4life
      • 1 Year Ago
      That's nice keep up the good work GM
      A P
      • 1 Year Ago
      It is funny that so many lemmings think that in order for something to be engineered really well, it must be complicated. This engine proves that myth wrong. Compared to its Euro competition, it is simplicity itself.
      Rochester
      • 1 Year Ago
      Odd looking headers... the two center ports look short (because I am in no way an automotive engineer). Anyway, OMG. Everytime I dismiss Chevy, I have to remind myself to say "Except for the Vette, of course."
        The Wasp
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Rochester
        The Camaro ZL1 and CTS-V are also well above par in terms of GM vehicles.
          Rochester
          • 1 Year Ago
          @The Wasp
          Yes, that's absolutely true. However, I can't look at those cars without shaking my head at the ugly. Well, to be honest, mostly it's the hideous Camaro that ruins the party. The new Stringray, on the other hand, really appeals to me in a deeply desirable, Marvel Comics kind of way.
          Bandit5317
          • 1 Year Ago
          @The Wasp
          @Rochester The Camaro seems to have a polarizing look for most people. I love it.
        Drakkon
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Rochester
        Header length does gain as much on a cross-plane V8 as a I-4 for example. Besides that, everything is tucked in tight and like others have said, lighting the cats ASAP is job number 1 for the emissions people.
        throwback
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Rochester
        Shorty headers help when space is tight. I wonder what power this engine will make in the flagship Caddy.
          Cory Stansbury
          • 1 Year Ago
          @throwback
          I think short headers are likely used for lighting off the catalyst more than anything else.
      Kristiyan Dimitrov
      • 1 Year Ago
      Please, excuse my ignorance, but how these four-into-one headers help the engine? Ferrari makes four-into-one exhaust, but first - Ferrari makes them with equal length and second - Ferrari makes even firing order V8's.
        Slizzo
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Kristiyan Dimitrov
        Not only that, GM has been using 4 into 1 manifolds for ages.
        Drakkon
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Kristiyan Dimitrov
        Ferraris are flat-plane V8s like BMWs. They are basically two four cylinders joined at a common crank. A SBC like an AMG engine are cross-plane cranks wih each piston on each bank 90 degrees out of phase with its neighbors. Equal length headers are not THAT important in a cross-plane engine. The reason is the length of time between exhaust pulses. In a flat crank, the time between exhaust pulses are regular. 1-2-3-4. In a cross plane, not so regular. 1...2-3...4. The point is what they call 'scavenging.' Each pulse is folowed by a very small vacuum. If the headers are equal length IN A FLAT PLANE that vacuum helps suck a little more exhaust out of the NEXT cylinder that you would get with a regular manifold. That extra little suck removes a little exhaust that otherwise would not escape and contaminate the next intake charge. You gain a little more power due to the cleaner charge. You can build a header (of UNequal lengths) that will have a similar affect on cross planes cranks (like the Chevy) but its effectiveness is married to a slime RPM range.
          Kristiyan Dimitrov
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Drakkon
          Hahahaha! Thank you for the lecture, but when I said "Excuse my ignorance" I didn't meant that I don't know what cross and flat plane crank V8's are and how equal length all-in-one headers work. I was wondering why the hell are they bragging about it exactly because I knew and to all my knowledge I couldn't explain to myself how is this helpful in any way in this particular example (the cross-plane uneven firing order LT1). And may I correct you on something. Except their racing engines and the very limited edition road legal E46 M3 GTR (which uses tamed version of the racing engine from the E46 M3 GTR racing car) no other BMW V8 engine has flat plane crank. They are all cross-plane. Don't be fulled by the noise of the X5/6 M and the F10 M5. They have cross-plane twin-turbo V8's. But the exhaust and the intake ports of the head are swapped. Meaning the exhaust ports are between the heads and the intakes are at the sides of the engine. The exhaust headers are cross-connected between both heads in a manner that the exhaust pulses are on equal intervals (every 180 degrees, just like flat plane V8).
      icemilkcoffee
      • 1 Year Ago
      Interesting to see that they use roller tappets, but dont bother with roller tipped rockers. That tells you there is more power hiding in the tappets than the rocker arms.
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