Porsche Panamera S E-Hybrid
  • Porsche Panamera S E-Hybrid
  • Porsche Panamera S E-Hybrid
  • Porsche Panamera S E-Hybrid
  • Porsche Panamera S E-Hybrid
  • Porsche Panamera S E-Hybrid
  • Porsche Panamera S E-Hybrid
  • Porsche Panamera S E-Hybrid
  • Porsche Panamera S E-Hybrid
As part of a recent event with a number of Panamera S E-Hybrids driven by journalists in Europe, Porsche's new plug-in managed to burn (on average) just 4.4 liters of fuel for each 100 kilometers. That's the equivalent of 53.45 miles per gallon. Porsche says this real-world, 745-mile test, which took place on an 18-mile loop along the Autobahn and through the city of Hockenheim, proves that the official NEDC rating of 3.1 l/km (75.87 mpg) is not some impossible-to-meet-outside-the-lab fuel economy level, especially since one journalist managed to get 2.8 l/km (84 mpg).

The 2014 Panamera S E-Hybrid, which was recently unveiled in Shanghai, has a 9.4-kWh lithium-ion battery that offers an all-electric range of 22 miles and can go from 0- 60 mph in 5.2 seconds with a top speed of 167 mph from a powertrain that puts out 416 horsepower and 435 pound-feet of torque. It takes two-and-a-half hours to recharge from a Level 2 charger.

The car arrives at Porsche dealers at the end of July in Europe and in the US in late 2013. The US base price is $99,000.
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Panamera S E-Hybrid consumes 4.4 l/100 km during test drives

Stuttgart. On the occasion of an international press event – in which over 42 test drives were conducted with journalists in the Panamera S E-Hybrid covering a total distance of over 1,200 kilometres – the model consumed just 4.4 l/100 km averaged over all drives. The top value recorded on the circuit course for the world's first plug-in hybrid in the luxury class was a low 2.8 l/100 km. These results illustrate that in real everyday operation, it is entirely possible to attain fuel consumption values of the same magnitude as the value determined in NEDC testing, which is 3.1 l/100 km. And it even accomplished this in four unmodified Panamera S E-Hybrid production cars, each carrying three to four persons, with the climate control system activated and accelerating up to 230 km/h on the motorway section of the route. The test circuit, which had a total length of 28.7 km, followed a course through and around the city of Hockenheim and comprised 6.5 km city driving, 9.2 km of country roads and 13 km of German Autobahn – some without speed limits. A prerequisite for attaining such values is systematically exploiting opportunities for charging the 9.4 kWh lithium-ion battery on the electrical grid.

The car's range of 36 kilometres in all-electric driving was also confirmed in practice with a fuel consumption value of 0.0 l/100 km and zero local emissions, which was not only attainable in NEDC testing on a dynamometer, but also on the street. And it even attains this value at an average speed of 54 km/h, while the average speed in NEDC testing is just 33 km/h.

The Panamera S E-Hybrid offers a combined system power of 416 hp (306 kW), accelerates from zero to 100 km/h in 5.5 seconds and has a top speed of 270 km/h. The new Panamera S E-Hybrid will be at dealers starting July 27, 2013.

* Porsche Panamera S E-Hybrid: Fuel consumption (combined) 3.1 l/100 km; CO2 emissions (combined) 71 g/km; electrical consumption (combined) 162 Wh/km; CO2 efficiency class (Germany): A+


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 61 Comments
      Ian
      • 1 Year Ago
      Yes, folks it's not all about the visual.
      PeterScott
      • 1 Year Ago
      This gets 53 MPG, like the Chevy Volt was going to get 230 MPG: http://www.askmen.com/cars/car-news/8_gm-volt-to-get-230-mpg.html From this info they are starting each individual 18 Mile test drive with a full battery. So these numbers only apply if you charge every 18 miles, and count electricity as magic free mileage boost. Fully charged on the same course a Chevy Volt would have INFINITE MPG.
        DaveMart
        • 1 Year Ago
        @PeterScott
        Of course the Volt would have infinite mileage, as it accelerates up to and past 142 miles per hour. Why people here make wholly inappropriate comparisons baffles me. There is not some magic 'perfect car' against which all others should be judged. This is a very high speed super car, and in its category gets great fuel economy, and what is more if your normal daily drive does not include a high speed stretch than for many most days it will use no petrol at all. Not many people cross shop a Chevy Volt and a Porsche Panamera.
      pmpjunkie01
      • 1 Year Ago
      Great to hear it can go 22 miles on a charge. Everyone able to afford this car should be able to figure out what kind of impact this will have on their fuel consumption. I could see myself going 80-90% gas free in this. Even though I like the Model S better I hope Porsche sells a lot of these so that Volkswagen gets a clue and starts offering more plug in hybrids across their brands.
        PeterScott
        • 1 Year Ago
        @pmpjunkie01
        But that is only at 30 MPH.
          PeterScott
          • 1 Year Ago
          @PeterScott
          That number comes from the press release above: "And it even attains this value at an average speed of 54 km/h"
          pmpjunkie01
          • 1 Year Ago
          @PeterScott
          There's a huge difference between driving with an average speed of 54km/h and a steady speed of 54 km/h. If you ever drove on the autobahn you would know that even there you have to go at odd times with very little traffic to get your average over 130 km/h. Try going 54 km/h on average in city driving and you probably get pulled over very quick.
          VL00
          • 1 Year Ago
          @PeterScott
          Where did you pull that number from? 22 Miles should be easy in mixed driving
          Jesse Gurr
          • 1 Year Ago
          @PeterScott
          Actually, the top speed is apparently 84 mph in all electric mode. About the same as Fusion/Cmax Energi. http://www.autoblog.com/2013/04/03/2014-porsche-panamera-arrives-with-new-e-hybrid-long-wheelbase/
      paulwesterberg
      • 1 Year Ago
      Nice to see Porsche evolving with its first few timid steps outside their primordial soup. But how does a real world test average result of 53mpg prove that 75.87mpg is not unrealistic. In scientific testing a single test result that greatly differs from other results would be considered an inaccurate outlier and disregarded.
        DaveMart
        • 1 Year Ago
        @paulwesterberg
        We are continually told that people should not want cars which can travel long distances on a charge, as most journeys most days are only around 30 miles.. So the test regime chosen shows excellent mileage over this sort of distance, with very varied driving conditions. So why the carping?
        DaveMart
        • 1 Year Ago
        @paulwesterberg
        It should not be assumed that US driving patterns are duplicated throughout the world. For a rather lower annual mileage German drivers make a much higher percentage of long distance journeys, often at very high speed. No doubt excellent public transport means that local commuting is reduced compared to the US. Even the mighty Tesla would have difficulty doing long distances on one charge with very high speed cruising, whilst you can forget about cars like the Leaf other than as City run-abouts. The Zoe and the E-Up will fill that role in Europe.
          Rotation
          • 1 Year Ago
          @DaveMart
          Speed unlimited sections of the autobahn are not the norm anymore. Very high speed driving is not the norm. Indeed the Tesla's range would be very short at these speeds. Not that gas car ranges are wonderful at 142mph either.
        Dave
        • 1 Year Ago
        @paulwesterberg
        ".....one journalist managed to get 2.8 l/km (84 mpg)..."
      no1bondfan
      • 1 Year Ago
      It looks like somebody clicked the option box next to ugly. Seriously, how could Porsche built such an ugly car? The 918 and the Carrera GT show that they can design a beautiful vehicle, and the Tesla Model S shows that practical sedans can be beautiful. When I see this car, I just think they phoned it in. "We'll put a Porsche logo on it and people will buy it no matter how ugly it is." What a waste of a great heritage.
        Dave
        • 1 Year Ago
        @no1bondfan
        I've seen a few on the road. They look better on the road than in pictures.
          PeterScott
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Dave
          One of my neighbors has one. I think they look pretty good IRL, but then again I didn't find they look that bad in photos either.
        no1bondfan
        • 1 Year Ago
        @no1bondfan
        *build
      JakeY
      • 1 Year Ago
      It's not really a comparison between the cars, but to point out how misleading this exercise is. The 52mpg number tells you neither how much electricity nor gas you would use in your own trip. Only a break down with the CD and CS efficiency can do that. The EPA testing here is not perfect (see the issues with Ford's hybrid line-up ratings), but it definitely is way better than the NEDC.
      Spec
      • 1 Year Ago
      Impressive. But I'd still take a Tesla. No need for that outdated ICE.
        Jesse Gurr
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Spec
        Here is a graph i found for speed vs range of the model S. http://insideevs.com/heres-how-speed-impacts-range-of-the-tesla-model-s/
        VL00
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Spec
        "The performance envelope of this car and the Tesla for sustained high speed cruising is completely different." Completely different, and utterly pointless. Driving at that speed, even on the Autobahn, is stressful and dangerous. And in America its completely pointless.
          no1bondfan
          • 1 Year Ago
          @VL00
          You're right, it is stressful. I was in Germany on vacation last year and got to drive on the Autobahn (check that one off the bucket list). We were middle-speed (approx. 120 mph), and the disparity between the (much) slower cars and the (much) faster cars made it fun, but pretty tense. With these things doing near 150, and other folks going 80 (and occasionally straying into the left lane to pass somebody slower), it certainly keeps you on your toes.
        DaveMart
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Spec
        Apples and oranges. You won't be driving the Tesla at 142 mph on the Autobahn.
          DaveMart
          • 1 Year Ago
          @DaveMart
          You won't be cruising for very long in the Tesla at 135 mph either.
          Spec
          • 1 Year Ago
          @DaveMart
          I don't live in Germany. The Autobahn is merely gimmick of ICE auto obsessed German history. Virtually no one drives long stretches of public roads above 100mph anywhere nor should they because it is not safe and is a waste of energy.
          DaveMart
          • 1 Year Ago
          @DaveMart
          The performance envelope of this car and the Tesla for sustained high speed cruising is completely different. That is why the comparison is simply daft.
          DaveMart
          • 1 Year Ago
          @DaveMart
          Its a German car, and they are selling them in Germany. Why should they not do tests that are applicable there? Not every car test has to be defined by what is wanted for Los Angeles, nor do you have any monopoly in determining what others should and should not want.
          Rotation
          • 1 Year Ago
          @DaveMart
          I won't be driving a Porsche Panamera at 142mph on the Autobahn either. I'd rather have the Tesla and I'll forgo all capabilities above 135mph to do so.
      Dave
      • 1 Year Ago
      Yet another company proves that you can save $10,000 in fuel by spending $50,000 on hardware.
      Rotation
      • 1 Year Ago
      No, it's not a supercar. I didn't say it was a minicar. The most efficient Panamera in Europe is rated at about 22mpg US EPA equivalent (combined). This is the V6 version. This is not counting the plug-in because the plug-in's figures are inflated by the lack of a proper testing system for plug-ins in Europe. They use a single figure of consumption for both CS and CD modes and this kind of measure is not useful as a standalone figure. It just doesn't convey enough info to represent the usage and efficiency of a two-energy source vehicle.
      PeterScott
      • 1 Year Ago
      @ DaveMart: "...sustained high speed cruising for any great distance without charging, and that is what the Porsche is all about." If the Porsche is all about sustained high speed cruising over great distances, then this is most definitely NOT an appropriate "Real world" test for the Porsche, since is is just a bunch of very short (18 mile) hops with charging in between. This nothing but a misleading rigged test for manufacturer PR.
      paulwesterberg
      • 1 Year Ago
      OK, I didn't notice that there was a short section of high speed driving, 230 km/h, which undoubtedly brought down the mileage so 75mpge is probably attainable if you have charge the vehicle regularly.
        Letstakeawalk
        • 1 Year Ago
        @paulwesterberg
        The Fisker Karma owners commonly report 100+ mpg with regular charging.
          Rotation
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Letstakeawalk
          He said mpge, not mpg. The Karma is not capable of 100mpge or even 75mpge because it gets 20mpg on gas and 54mpge on electricity.
      Rotation
      • 1 Year Ago
      They should have driven a 9 mile loop instead and gotten infinite mpg. Advertising plug-ins with a single figure of mpg is misleading. See GM's 230mpg gaffe a long way back. Even advertising with mixed-mode MPGe isn't terribly informative.
        VL00
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Rotation
        230 gaffe? My lifetime after 17,000 miles is 315 MPG equivalent
        otiswild
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Rotation
        I've owned my Volt for nearly 2 years, lifetime MPG: 231.
          Rotation
          • 1 Year Ago
          @otiswild
          paulwesterberg: No, he is listing mpg, not mpge. His figures are accurate mpg and not inflated.
          paulwesterberg
          • 1 Year Ago
          @otiswild
          Total distance 1,424.1 miles, Total energy used: 296.9 kWh which is equivalent to 9gallons of gas. Overall efficiency: 158 mpge.
          paulwesterberg
          • 1 Year Ago
          @otiswild
          I have driven 1400 miles on 0 gallons of gas in my leaf so far.
          Rotation
          • 1 Year Ago
          @otiswild
          I've driving over 2500 miles on 0 gallons of gas in my LEAF so far. I am currently running approximately inifinite mpg and I expect this to improve now that more temperate weather is upon us.
          paulwesterberg
          • 1 Year Ago
          @otiswild
          @otiswild, you need to account for the electricity used. You vehicles computer display does is programmed to inflate your mileage by ignoring that information.
          Ryan
          • 1 Year Ago
          @otiswild
          My Dad has gone 240 miles on 1/3rd a gallon of gas in his C-Max Energi so far.
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