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While Nissan is expanding the single-charge range on its all-electric Leaf, the Japanese automaker is also working on shortening the distance between publicly accessible quick-charge stations.

Nissan is collaborating with CarCharging Group to deploy more quick chargers throughout the most Leaf-heavy parts of the country. Specifically, about 48 Nissan-branded quick chargers will soon be offered in California and on the East Coast. Such chargers can provide energy to fill 80 percent of the Leaf's battery capacity in about 30 minutes. CarCharging Group is also developing a mobile app that will give users real-time information on charging-station locations.

Earlier this month, Nissan said it has exceeded 25,000 Leaf sale in the US. Through the first four months of the year, the company more than doubled sales (compared to 2012) to 5,476 vehicles and is coming off two of its best sales months ever for the little EV. Check out Nissan's press release below.
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Nissan and CarCharging to Expand Electric Vehicle Quick Charger Network

Companies aim to improve infrastructure, education to expand market for electric cars

NASHVILLE, Tenn., and MIAMI BEACH, Fla., May 14, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- Nissan and Car Charging Group, Inc. (OTCQB: CCGI), a nationwide provider of convenient electric vehicle (EV) charging services, announced a joint initiative to make EV charging more readily available and to expand consumer awareness of the electric car market. CarCharging and Nissan will work together to determine the placement of the chargers, which is expected to be in key markets throughout the United States by the end of 2013.

Nissan's quick charger stations drastically reduce charging times, charging a fully depleted Nissan LEAF to 80 percent capacity in approximately 30 minutes. The initial goal for the initiative is to deploy the 48 Nissan-branded quick chargers primarily in California and on the East Coast.

As a part of the initiative, CarCharging will continue to educate consumers about how the EV charging infrastructure enhances the adoption and use of electric cars. This campaign will include tools to communicate the charging opportunities for drivers without private garages, such as residents of apartment and condo communities; the ease and benefits of public EV charging; and charging subscription offerings.

CarCharging is also developing a mobile application to provide real-time charging station location information with turn-by-turn directions and access capability for all CarCharging EV charging stations, including ChargePoint® and Nissan's quick chargers. CarCharging will also offer its proprietary evCharge card at no cost to all LEAF drivers at participating Nissan dealerships. The evCharge card allows drivers to initiate use and payment at all public charging stations on the ChargePoint® Network, the largest national online network connecting EV drivers to EV charging stations.

Brendan Jones , Nissan director for EV Infrastructure, said, "Nissan's commitment to expanding EV charging infrastructure-including quick chargers with businesses such as CarCharging-not only supports today's Nissan LEAF and other EV drivers, but also helps prepare communities for the increasing use of EVs. With more than 25,000 Nissan LEAFs already on U.S. roads, bolstering infrastructure further accelerates the adoption curve as it provides range confidence and promotes additional zero-emissions driving."

"CarCharging is thrilled to enhance our products and services by including Nissan's quick chargers in our public EV charging network and to offer our evCharge card to consumers who purchase a LEAF at a Nissan dealership," said Michael D. Farkas , CEO of CarCharging. "Through our partnership with Nissan, we are eager to expand the EV market by educating consumers who don't live in single-family homes and may not be aware of public EV charging services available today."

EV drivers can easily pinpoint the new quick charger stations as well as all of CarCharging's EV charging station locations and request CarCharging's evCharge card via its website at www.CarCharging.com.

To learn more about Nissan LEAF, the world's best-selling all-electric vehicle, visit www.nissanusa.com/leaf.

About Car Charging Group, Inc.

Car Charging Group, Inc. (OTCQB: CCGI) is a pioneer in nationwide public electric vehicle (EV) charging services at accessible and convenient locations. Headquartered in Miami, Florida with offices in California, New York, Canada, and Spain, CarCharging is committed to creating a robust, feature-rich network for EV charging. CarCharging typically pays for all hardware, installation, maintenance and related services; therefore, eliminating initial capital costs for all property owners.

CarCharging has 85 strategic partnerships across various business sectors. CarCharging's partners manage or own a total of over 8 million parking spaces, and include, but are not limited to Simon Property Group, Walgreens, Sears, Intel, Ace Parking, Central Parking, Equity One, Equity Residential, Forest City Enterprises, Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission, City of Miami Beach (FL), and the City of Santa Clara (CA).

For more information about CarCharging, please visit www.CarCharging.com.

About Nissan North America

In North America, Nissan's operations include automotive styling, engineering, consumer and corporate financing, sales and marketing, distribution and manufacturing. Nissan is dedicated to improving the environment under the Nissan Green Program and has been recognized as an ENERGY STAR® Partner of the Year in 2010, 2011 and 2012 by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. More information on Nissan in North America and the complete line of Nissan and Infiniti vehicles can be found online at www.NissanUSA.com and www.InfinitiUSA.com or visit the Americas media sites NissanNews.com and InfinitiNews.com.

About Nissan

Nissan Motor Co., Ltd., Japan's second-largest automotive company, is headquartered in Yokohama, Japan, and is part of the Renault-Nissan Alliance. Operating with more than 248,000 employees globally, Nissan provided customers with more than 4.9 million vehicles in 2012, generating revenue of 9.4 trillion yen ($US 118.95 billion) in fiscal 2011. With a strong commitment to developing exciting and innovative products for all, Nissan delivers a comprehensive range of 64 models under the Nissan and Infiniti brands. A pioneer in zero-emission mobility, Nissan made history with the introduction of the Nissan LEAF, the first affordable, mass-market, pure-electric vehicle and winner of numerous international accolades, including the prestigious 2011-2012 Car of the Year Japan and 2011 World Car of the Year awards. For more information on our products, services and commitment to sustainable mobility, visit our website at http://www.nissan-global.com/EN/.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 23 Comments
      Spec
      • 1 Year Ago
      Nissan is trying to make a gambit here to have ChadeMo become the de facto EV fast-charge standard. Ugh. that is just not going to work Nissan. You are not big enough. Heck, you only offer one EV that you have pigeon-holed as being the greenie car with the weird frog eyes and name "Leaf". You are going to have to offer more EVs to have this scheme work. I think this is a very bad idea. Every US and every German automaker has lined up behind the SAE-Combo charger. You can't even get fellow ChadeMo member Toyota to release a single ChadeMo car. Please, just adopt SAE-Combo and you'll become the company with the first-mover advantage.
        SublimeKnight
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Spec
        Why not partner with Tesla? Contract to help build up the supercharger network in exchange for use of the standard and access to the network. SAE and ChadeMo both lag behind the capabilities/specs of the supercharger standard.
          JakeY
          • 1 Year Ago
          @SublimeKnight
          Tesla's network and connector are proprietary and unlikely to change. It's designed to be exclusive to Tesla vehicles. CHAdeMO's spec can go up to 200A also, but all the existing chargers and connectors are rated for 50kW. SAE doesn't really lag behind Tesla much, it supports up to 500V*200A for 90kW peak (80kW when charging 400V). There's also a next level that can support up to 240kW, but that may require a change to the connector. In practical use they will probably mainly be 50kW units (because lots of them will be dual connector stations or converted from a CHAdeMO station). SAE, like Tesla's connector can also be used for AC charging (CHAdeMO can't). Tesla's Supercharger currently goes to 90kW (400V*225A) and can go up 120kW (400V*300A) with the same connector.
          Rotation
          • 1 Year Ago
          @SublimeKnight
          Tesla doesn't share their chargers. And the usage models are incompatible. Tesla doesn't have a lot of chargers and isn't interested in having a lot of chargers. They want them on the edge of town so you can use them to drive between towns. Nissan needs theirs in town since the range is so much shorter on the LEAF. Spec-wise SAE does not Tesla's superchargers. Implementation-wise, yes, the first SAE chargers will be only 50kW, like CHAdeMO is.
          Letstakeawalk
          • 1 Year Ago
          @SublimeKnight
          Tesla chargers are private. To open them up to a larger public would cause some legal issues.
          paulwesterberg
          • 1 Year Ago
          @SublimeKnight
          In theory the SAE combo charger could offer higher power charging than the Telsa superchargers, in reality Tesla has the highest power chargers(90kW) available now.
        David Murray
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Spec
        In all fairness, there are hundreds of Chademo stations installed and operational and there are zero SAE standard, as well as zero cars on the road that can make use of it. What incentive does Nissan have to switch? And keep in mind that a lot of existing Leaf owners would be pretty mad if their Leafs could no longer get a quick-charge because all of the stations get switched over to SAE. I suspect most of the cost of a DC quick charge station is in the actually physical installation and getting the permits and the electrical lines installed. So I suspect what we'll eventually see are chargers with both connectors on them. That is if any SAE equipped vehicles ever show up on the streets.
          paulwesterberg
          • 1 Year Ago
          @David Murray
          Only the top of the line SL leafs have Chademo ports. So the number of vehicles is pretty limited. I didn't opt for the extra expense on my lease vehicle because there are no Chademo chargers in my state.
          • 1 Year Ago
          @David Murray
          I agree -- the only people jumping up and down about the SAE's late to the party and party pooping standard are the ones who have a weird sense of priorities. And yes, the permitting process and public utility obstruction was likely the biggest obstacle to getting those chargers installed in the first place, adapting to another charge connector should be a bit less painful. I am amused by the people who say they didn't opt for the QC because there aren't any chargers available. As someone who was in the first wave of Leaf recipients, I got the QC knowing full well that only *TWO* DC quick chargers existed in the entire US, and (oddly enough) none of those was in the SF Bay area. Now there are over 40, making it possible for me to travel (From Alameda) to Petaluma, San Jose, and Vacaville and back without prayer or a multi-hour level 2 charge.
          paulwesterberg
          • 1 Year Ago
          @David Murray
          If I lived in San Fran, home of hippies and carb regulations, I would have opted for the quick charger, but I live in midwestern flyover country. Here there are not even any slow level 2 chargers along any of the interstate routes. Plenty of chargers in town but I can drive all over town on one days charge so I don't really need them. My lease will be up in 2 years and by then I hope that there are a couple of Tesla superchargers in my state and a showroom in town.
          Rotation
          • 1 Year Ago
          @David Murray
          Have fun with the Nissan charger in Petaluma: 'Nissan employee seemed miffed on being asked to provide access to the L3 charge. Was showing ICE car to customer, parked blocking unit, apparently about to walk away.'
        JakeY
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Spec
        Unlikely to happen. They have obligations to existing Leaf owners (many who will be keeping their cars for quite some time) and they have invested tons of money into the standard (both on the cars and also into building the chargers). US/CARB policy right now is to build stations that support both standards, so Nissan probably sees that as meaning CHAdeMO still has a chance. Even in the EU, where they excluded CHAdeMO from their DC charging guidelines, they haven't given up. I do agree if they just adopt SAE (and offer connector retrofits to existing Leaf owners with CHAdeMO sockets while there aren't too many yet) that'll be the best way for everyone, but probably not going to happen.
      David Murray
      • 1 Year Ago
      I think sometimes people need to understand that 30 minute charge time a little better. Even 30 minutes sounds like a long time to sit somewhere waiting on your car to charge. But it is important to explain to people that most likely when you pull into such a station 1 of two scenarios will exist: 1) Your battery is already half-full but you know you need to top it off before your trip home. 2) Your battery is empty, but you only need about 20 miles of range to get home. In either case, your charging time will probably be 10-15 minutes. Not nearly as bad as people think. It would probably be a rare thing to pull up to a station completely empty and then charge it all the way up in one stop.
      Rotation
      • 1 Year Ago
      They already rolled them out in the SF Bay Area. And by "rolled them out" I mean it's already turning into a disaster. Nissan put the chargers in but the dealers have no interest in really getting them into use. Look any of them up on Plugshare and you see that you must talk to the service manager to use the charger. The service manager leaves at 5 and may not even be available during the day because he has a job to do. Nissan should have ensured the chargers were put in accessible locations and given every LEAF owner a card key to use them. I can charge at the Volkswagen ERL any time I want (and today I will) but the Nissan dealer near me isn't worth the trouble. I drove 125 miles each way on a trip last weekend, fast charging 4 times and none was at a Nissan dealer because they are a hassle and the availability is spotty.
        JakeY
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Rotation
        Hopefully this collaboration means these will NOT be installed at dealers. From what I have heard that was a disaster in the UK and looking to be the same in the US. A charger that is available only during business hours and must be called ahead to confirm permission (which might not be given, and even when given sometimes it's revoked/forgotten when you arrive or the person who gave it is not there) is practically worthless.
        Spec
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Rotation
        Wow. They are really shooting themselves in the foot with that. But I'm not surprised. The dealers really don't like these EVs. I think they get a smaller margin on them and there is no lucrative maintenance to be made off the EVs. That is hilarious that Volkswagen is supporting your Leaf better than Nissan! I won't even attempt such long trips with the EV, I just use the gas car for them.
          Rotation
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Spec
          I'll use the gas car next time. I wanted to see if it could do it, and it can. But it's not worth the trouble. The car can really can only fast charge a limited number of times per day and a 250 mile trip is very close to using all that up. Due to a fast charger shutting down on me in the middle of charging (and turning one session into two), I was actually out of fast charges for the day, if I had to charge once more it would have been a multi-hour wait.
      Rotation
      • 1 Year Ago
      Volkswagen ERL update: They have a "double barrel" Blink CHAdeMO. They have an L2 AeroVironment, one of those ones that hides the cord inside until you unlock it. They have two L2 ChargePoints. And they have an Eaton DCFC of unknown provenance. This is the one that is supposed to be an SAE combo charger. But the box on the right which has the charger probe in it is locked so I couldn't look. It's quite possible this actually does have an SAE combo probe on it, but I couldn't tell. If not, it's a CHAdeMO. You can't use it anyway, so it doesn't matter much. They also had two electric VW Golfs. One was plugged into an L2 ChargePoint. The other was not plugged in. These vehicles do NOT have SAE combo charger inlets, and do not have room to be adapted to have them. I was unable to look behind the charge door on the one which was not plugged in (the charge door was not closed fully, but I didn't feel comfortable touching their car to open it) but the door was the exact same size as the one that was being charged, so I'm quite sure it didn't have an SAE combo inlet behind there. I looked into their employee-only area to see if there were any other EVs in there, I didn't see any. So I kind of wonder why they would even have an SAE combo charger if they don't have any vehicle that can support it, including the one in the picture at this link (http://www.evcollaborative.org/sites/all/themes/pev/files/PEV%20Collaborative DC Combo Update for 13Mar2013_final2_0.pdf). The car not charging is the one in the picture at the above link, the one charging was the one which is not in the picture. The charging inlet has a little light next to the socket which presumably shows if the car is done charging or not. Also note both EV Golfs have white Cali HOV stickers even though the car is in the list of vehicles qualified for them. Presumably they got them approved by Cali as conversions.
        Rotation
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Rotation
        er, the car is not on the list of vehicles qualified for them I mean.
        JakeY
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Rotation
        The 2010 e-motion prototype has two possible charging port locations, one in the front under the VW logo and one where the gas filler used to be. I suppose they have two to test out which one works best. http://www.caranddriver.com/photos-10q3/362821/volkswagen-golf-blue-e-motion-charging-port-cable-photo-362874 I don't believe 20 e-golf prototypes they launched in early 2012 have the combo connector (the connector didn't even exist back then and those prototypes were based on the 2010 e-motion above). They have the round fueling flap can only fit J1772 AC (pictured with Mennekes in the 2010 pictures above). You can see it charging here, I suspect these were the cars you saw: http://green.autoblog.com/photos/volkswagen-e-golf/full/#photo-4926661 The official 2014 "production" design uses a different rectangular flap on the side (it's also based on the next gen Golf) and that one does have the combo socket. It's shown here with the European version of the plug (in the US this would be swapped with J1772): http://www.greencarreports.com/news/1082438_volkswagen-e-golf-details-images-leaked-ahead-of-geneva-show
          JakeY
          • 1 Year Ago
          @JakeY
          @Rotation Thanks for scouting it out anyways. If there's a car with a combo socket being tested here (which there should be if they aren't lying in the slide) it might well be hidden, esp. if it's in the official 2014 Golf sheet metal instead of a modified 2010 prototype. As for scouting for the PHEVs, I think even if they are doing testing in the US they probably will have it hidden. But I don't believe they have announced any PHEVs coming to the US, so they might not even have any testing here.
          Rotation
          • 1 Year Ago
          @JakeY
          Several of those cars look exactly like one of the ones I saw. The other one looks the same with more stickers on it. Those pictures of the two ChargePoint chargers and other cars there (but not the pics taken at The Mountain House on Skyline) are all taken at the VW ERL. The Mountain House is a short drive away (28 miles round trip) as long as there isn't traffic on CA-92. The combo inlet there looks great, not Tesla great, but considering it's an add-on it looks great. Not sure why people beef about it. If VW has any of these as the ERL right now, they might be hiding them away around the corner in the employees lot. It would be pretty easy to get a peek at this area, but it would require walking around the corner of the building in a suspicious fashion. It didn't seem worth it. No sign of any of their PHEVs there either. They did have an Audi Allroad (the smaller one, not the A6-sized one) in what appeared to be an electric car parking spot. But there were no visible alterations to it from stock.
      Dave D
      • 1 Year Ago
      When are they going to show Atlanta some love? I see them all over the place here now and hell, we have 4 of them at work! LOL
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