We'll forgive Nissan for gloating a bit, now that the Japanese automaker has surpassed the 25,000- sales threshold for the Leaf EV in the US.

Coming off two of its best months domestically, the all-electric Leaf has complemented its sales on the West Coast with more recent demand increases in markets such as Atlanta, Dallas and Chicago. All told, Nissan, which recently started producing US Leafs at its Tennessee plant, has sold 62,000 Leafs globally.

With production moving stateside, Nissan was able to cut the price of the 2013 Leaf by $6,400 to a base of $28,800, and that's before the $7,500 federal tax credit kicks in. Through April, Nissan more than doubled year-earlier Leaf sales to 5,476 units. And the model recently received an additional boost when the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) confirmed its new fuel economy rating for the Leaf at 115 miles per gallon equivalent, up from 99 MPGe. Check out Nissan's press release below.
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Nissan LEAF Crosses 25,000 U.S. Sales Milestone

NASHVILLE, Tenn., May 15, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- After the all-electric Nissan LEAF's best sales month ever in March and a 423.5 percent year-over-year sales increase in April, Nissan LEAF continues to make history by crossing the 25,000 sales threshold, reinforcing LEAF's position as the world's best-selling electric vehicle.

"From the beginning our goal with LEAF has been to bring affordable, zero-emission transportation to the mass market in a practical, fun-to-drive package," said Erik Gottfried , Nissan director of electric vehicle (EV) marketing and sales strategy. "With more than 25,000 LEAFs in the U.S. and 62,000 around the world, we're seeing the adoption curve for EVs accelerate, and there is tremendous interest not only on the West Coast but in a number of new strongholds like Atlanta, Raleigh, Denver, Dallas, Chicago, St. Louis and many more."

Nissan LEAF sales have risen steadily since the vehicle's launch and have grown tremendously compared to the previous year with sales jumping several-fold in LEAF's traditionally high-performing markets such as San Francisco-where LEAF was the top-selling vehicle for the Nissan brand in April-Los Angeles, Seattle, Portland and San Diego.

"Pioneering the EV trail with LEAF, we've had the opportunity to evaluate the purchase process of EV buyers. We have maintained an ongoing dialogue with our customers, and through that we've learned just how different the process is for buying a LEAF versus a traditional gas-powered car," said Gottfried. "We've found that customers interested in LEAF come to the showroom exceptionally well educated about the product. Then post-purchase, they stay engaged with us, connect with the LEAF owner community and share their experience broadly, which drives greater interest in LEAF."

"We've also learned how infrastructure plays a role in a consumer's decision to go all-electric," added Brendan Jones , Nissan's director of EV infrastructure strategy and deployment. "We already knew that areas with a higher concentration of EVs would require more charging stations, but trends show that the reverse is also true-a more robust charging infrastructure generates greater interest in EVs and stimulates more EV driving among EV owners."

Nissan continues to make progress with its commitment to enhance the charging infrastructure in the United States and since announcing plans earlier this year to triple the number of quick chargers from 200 to 600, Nissan and its charging partners already have installed about 50 additional units where interest in LEAF and EVs is highest.

"Nissan is taking a three-prong approach to bolster infrastructure by working with commercial charging partners to bring a variety of charging options to our customers, collaborating with businesses to encourage workplace charging on their campuses and engaging in pilots with our dealers to determine how to optimize the role they can play in EV infrastructure," said Jones. "This enhanced infrastructure-particularly with more businesses offering workplace charging as an employee benefit-builds range confidence and gives EV drivers better end-to-end charging ability, meaning they can leave home fully charged, plug in at work and be charged when they leave."

Nissan, which now assembles LEAF, its battery and its electric motor all in Tennessee, introduced the 2013 LEAF with more customer-focused features and an expanded range of trim levels to include a more attainable version and models with more premium amenities such as leather seats and BOSE energy-efficient audio. U.S. pricing for the 2013 LEAF starts at $28,800 and depending on location, some consumers may get the vehicle for as low as $18,800 by qualifying for federal and state tax credits, making LEAF competitive with gas-powered vehicles of its size. Nissan LEAF currently may be leased for $199 per month with $1,999 down for 36 months. Learn more at www.NissanUSA.com/LEAF.

About Nissan North America

In North America, Nissan's operations include automotive styling, engineering, consumer and corporate financing, sales and marketing, distribution and manufacturing. Nissan is dedicated to improving the environment under the Nissan Green Program and has been recognized as an ENERGY STAR® Partner of the Year in 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013 by the U.S Environmental Protection Agency. More information on Nissan in North America and the complete line of Nissan and Infiniti vehicles can be found online at www.NissanUSA.com and www.InfinitiUSA.com, or visit the Americas media sites NissanNews.com and InfinitiNews.com.

About Nissan

Nissan Motor Co., Ltd., Japan's second-largest automotive company, is headquartered in Yokohama, Japan, and is part of the Renault-Nissan Alliance. Operating with more than 248,000 employees globally, Nissan provided customers with more than 4.9 million vehicles in 2012, generating revenue of 9.4 trillion yen ($US118.95 billion) in fiscal 2011. With a strong commitment to developing exciting and innovative products for all, Nissan delivers a comprehensive range of 64 models under the Nissan and Infiniti brands. A pioneer in zero-emission mobility, Nissan made history with the introduction of the Nissan LEAF, the first affordable, mass-market, pure-electric vehicle and winner of numerous international accolades, including the prestigious 2011-2012 Car of the Year Japan and 2011 World Car of the Year awards.

For more information on our products, services and commitment to sustainable mobility, visit our website at http://www.nissan-global.com/EN/.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 28 Comments
      Giza Plateau
      • 2 Years Ago
      Hehe, did you hear the news? Tesla decided to implement my ponzi scheme suggestion :) They're offering more stock so that they can pay back the gov loan thus appear to be even more successful despite the fact that they have never been profitable on anything (except ZEV credits). 830m$ That's going to ensure TSLA's existence for at least a couple of years. They should really change name to Cashburn Motors : ) I'm not sure there has been a company in the history of the world that has been this successful despite worthless business merits :) All the bad decisions, all the financial and engineering incompetence just washed away with endless funds from the stock market : ) Fascinating
        markkiernan
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Giza Plateau
        Jealous
        Grendal
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Giza Plateau
        It's a great move for Tesla. 1. They get the shorts to pay off the Federal loan. 2. They get the Federal loan off their back. 3. They now have $600 million in cash reserves to move ahead with future projects. 4. It should let them show a profit for the next quarter instead of a loss.
          Actionable Mango
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Grendal
          On your first two point: 1. Nope, the shorts don't pay off the gov loan. Tesla is selling stock AND offering $450 million worth of bonds. So they are paying off one loan with another loan of almost exactly the same amount, so to say the stock offering is paying off the loan is misleading. 2. Sure, they get the Federal loan off their back... only to have a private loan on their back.
        ElectricAvenue
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Giza Plateau
        "I'm not sure there has been a company in the history of the world that has been this successful despite worthless business merits :)" You accuse others of ignorance and incompetence, and then you make such an outlandish, easily controvertible statement? Wow, Giza. You're a loon. If your goal is to ensure that no one takes you seriously even though you might occasionally have something worthwhile to say, then by all means keep making such idiotic pronouncements.
        krona2k
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Giza Plateau
        Really Dan no-one does it right for you. Should the model S be made out of Balsa wood?
        mycommentemail
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Giza Plateau
        Hey Dan, What do you drive?
          Marcopolo
          • 2 Years Ago
          @mycommentemail
          @ mycommentemail Dan, doesn't ! By his own admission he is only allowed to sit in the back seat of his mom's Ford focus.
        methos1999
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Giza Plateau
        Uh oh, did you go off your meds today? Ranting against Tesla when there is no mention of them in this article about the Nissan Leaf?
          Spec
          • 2 Years Ago
          @methos1999
          The aliens stole his meds.
          TurboFroggy
          • 2 Years Ago
          @methos1999
          And a dingo got his baby...
          Giza Plateau
          • 2 Years Ago
          @methos1999
          I don't need the medication anymore : ) It's such big news I couldn't wait for ABG to catch up.
      brotherkenny4
      • 2 Years Ago
      The Leaf provides good value for the correct commuters. The price is right, and I think many more people will realise this soon. With the Leaf, there are several factors that can shape your opinion, it doesn't just have to be environmental concerns. It can be a desire to reduce our dependence on oil ( a finite resource that limits our future), it can be environmental (despite the claims to the contrary, EVs produce less pollution - of all types), and now, the Leaf provides financial savings (the somewhat higher price of the Leaf is more than offset in fuel savings for people with an appropriate commute). It is a logical choice.
        ElectricAvenue
        • 2 Years Ago
        @brotherkenny4
        To the list of positives, I would add a big one for me: lack of noise. Especially when stopped. It just seems so idiotic for cars to be making noise (and emitting pollutants) while going nowhere. Pedestrians and cyclists (and all of us to a lesser extent) have to breathe that stuff.
        methos1999
        • 2 Years Ago
        @brotherkenny4
        First generation EVs to me have a paradox problem as commuter vehicles. They would be very useful for people with long commutes because of all the gas and maintenance costs they'd save. But they're not well suited for people with long commutes because they aren't easily able to do the round trip. Perfect example is my wife has a 60 mile round trip commute and it's doubtful that she could charge at work. If it had about 20 miles more range, we would consider it. If the Volt or plug-in fusion were about $10k cheaper we'd consider them.
          Dave D
          • 2 Years Ago
          @methos1999
          I think you're right, it's a first gen problem for you. I think you'll find what you need on both fronts by about 2015-2016.
        Giza Plateau
        • 2 Years Ago
        @brotherkenny4
        No the price isn't right. Even a dumb conventional engineering piece like the Leaf could be done for say 20.800 with profit. If they made it light and aerodynamic like intelligent engineers would, they could get the price even lower.
      markkiernan
      • 2 Years Ago
      Here in Italy they haven't sold many, well considering that you cant find a dealer that sells one, and the general public have never heard of the car, also I have not seen one advertisement for the Leaf. My next car is either the Leaf or the Renault Zoe, but it is sad that most people know nothing about EVs and those who have heard of them have stupid misconceptions.
        Marcopolo
        • 2 Years Ago
        @markkiernan
        @ markkiernan Having driven both, I would sy both are great little cars, but if I lived in Italy, I'd choose the Zoe. But for versatility Opel's Ampera beats both. ,
      Letstakeawalk
      • 2 Years Ago
      Congrats Nissan!
      • 1 Year Ago
      we provide Japanese automaker has surpassed the more then 25,000 sales threshold through seoclerks.com
      Chuck
      • 2 Years Ago
      Looks like we're headed for critical mass :-) Once enough people have that light bulb moment growth should really pick up. I just traded in my 2011 for a 2013. Looks the same on the outside but what a great car.
        krona2k
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Chuck
        Have you noticed the reduction in torque? That's the only thing that makes me wonder if I will want to upgrade. I'm hoping there will be a full version 2 available by then (Feb 2016) with more power not less, it's addictive!
      Dave D
      • 2 Years Ago
      I was doing some checking and I see that we're due for big announcements in June. Seems we're about to pass 100K total cumulative sales of Plug-Ins for the US. Definitely moving towards critical mass. http://www.electricdrive.org/index.php?ht=d/sp/i/20952/pid/20952
        Marcopolo
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Dave D
        I hate to be a downer, but 'critical mass' requires just a little more than 1% of new vehicle sales. Remember, all EV's are subsidised by government incentives. Which is why Tesla is such an important vehicle. Tesla owners might be delighted to receive the government tax credit, but it's not a major percentage of the purchase. Tesla also benefit from sales of CARB credits etc. Nissan Leaf buyers are also subsidized by the Japanese government as well as the US taxpayer. ( US manufacture benefit from the R&D costs of it's parent having been established in Japan). Don't get me wrong, I'm very pleased that some government have been far-sighted enough to provide incentives for EV's, but no is not the time to start talking about "critical mass" or those incentives may disappear !
          Marco Polo
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Marcopolo
          @ Dave D "but let me bask in the glow of a relatively large, round number for a moment, please" Absolutely ! It seems like only yesterday when there were no EV's ! I admire and endorse your enthusiasm !
          Dave D
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Marcopolo
          I can see your worry about the attempt to take away subsidies if we hit "critical mass". But 1) Obama will be in office till 2016 and nobody is taking them away until he's gone. And now that they're becoming more popular, less congressional morons are targeting them as more of their constituents want those incentives now. 2) I'm not a huge fan of subsidies for ANYTHING. I know that they're needed right now for EVs, but I look forward to the day they aren't. When I talk critical mass, I mean the point where there are hundreds of thousands of EVs made per year so that the infrastructure to manufacture and support them because scaled up and the prices drop. We're not really that close yet and I got a bit carried away...but let me bask in the glow of a relatively large, round number for a moment, please. :-)
      Dave D
      • 2 Years Ago
      Congratulations! That is a great milestone and I can't wait to see how quickly they'll hit 50K units now that the momentum is building.
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