Three Ford owners from Ohio have filed a lawsuit against the automaker over defects that they allege exist within the company's twin-turbocharged 3.5-liter V6 EcoBoost engine. Automotive News reports that the lawsuit claims the engine "contained serious latent design, manufacturing, or assembly defects." Those defects, the suit claims, cause the vehicle to shake, misfire and lose power quickly.

Two of the plaintiffs, a married couple, own a 2010 Ford Taurus SHO, and allege they experienced a loss of power and stalling, while the third, an F-150 owner, claims he lost power while accelerating. In addition to the Taurus SHO and F-150, the 3.5-liter V6 EcoBoost engine is also available in the Ford Flex, Explorer Sport and Lincoln MKT and MKS. Other three- and four-cylinder EcoBoost engines are not included in the suit. There have been no recalls associated with 3.5-liter V6 engine, and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is currently not investigating the matter.

The plaintiffs, however, claim Ford has known about the problem, citing several technical service bulletins issued to dealers of the F-150 that suggest possible fixes. Ford had no comment for Automotive News, saying that it's yet to review the lawsuit, which was filed last Friday in Columbus, OH.


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  • 156 Comments
      Spartan
      • 1 Year Ago
      Coil packs in the Taurus SHO. Water in the intercooler in the F-150 I own both ('10 Taurus and a '12 F-150 EB) and after a trip to the dealer, there were no issues. It felt like a spark plug misfire when it happened. In the F-150 it happened after it rained, and in the Taurus SHO it happened on hot days.
      RMS
      • 1 Year Ago
      I have owned over 50 cars in the last 48 years, none of them Fords, all American brands. Right now I'm driving a 2002 GM product purchased three years ago that is paid for and I am very happy with. Seems to me that the problems these people are experiencing would be covered under the Lemon law, and the cars may still be covered under their original warranty.
      Jerry
      • 1 Year Ago
      My boss had the issues described in his truck. Ford ended up buying the whole truck back and giving him a new one with more features. The new one has had no issues. Ford told him there was an issue with the charge air cooler "over cooling" and building up condensation under the right conditions. The condensation is what made it run rough, sputter, lose power, etc. I bet this phenomenon is at least partially to blame for these folks' woes.
      tshadis
      • 1 Year Ago
      I have experienced this problem with my '10 SHO. Multiple trips to the dealer, and the problem kept coming back. The dealer replaced thousands of dollars in parts, but never identified the root cause of the problem. In my case the SHO enthusiast world helped me identify and solve the problem on my own. I still don't think a TSB has been issued for the problem that I and many other SHO owners have experienced. Essentially the abrasion resistant shielding on the knock sensor wires is too short. The wires rub on a casting line on the intake manifold resulting in small holes/cracks in the shielding. The bare wire was shorting out to the the intake manifold, which in turn drives the ECU to retard the timing and kill the power output. The problem never logged a code, and was so intermittent it was hard to track down. I had a hell of a time even convincing the dealer there was a problem in the first place for this reason. When they replaced parts, they must have disturbed the wire enough that it was no longer shorting out and the problem would go away for awhile. This was so infuriating! After I fixed the problem myself about a year ago, the car has run great ever since (no thanks to Ford)!
      Matrix
      • 1 Year Ago
      I dont see a problem here, everything seems to be in order. Ford = Found on road dead.
        Patrick Schultz
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Matrix
        you only find fords on the road dead because the dodges and chevys died before they could get out of the driveway
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Patrick Schultz
          [blocked]
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
        • 1 Year Ago
        [blocked]
        EXP Jawa
        • 1 Year Ago
        My crummy Ford from the late \'90s has 302K miles on it with minimal work other than normal maintenance and still runs strong.
      thedriveatfive
      • 1 Year Ago
      How is this news? 3people from ohio are litigation happy.. so what.
      JDM
      • 1 Year Ago
      As usual the Ford cheerleaders jump to the defense without any research. Yes, three people filed suit, but there is also a suit pending in Louisiana for the same problem. AB failed to mention that NHTSA has received over 100 complaints involving the Taurus and F-150 with the ecoboom. Also during a test drive, a tester at the autoconnection had a similar issue on an ecoboost engine. By all means read on: http://www.thecarconnection.com/news/1084213_ford-owners-file-lawsuit-claim-ecoboost-engine-loses-power-during-acceleration http://www.carcomplaints.com/news/2013/ford-sued-over-ecoboost-engines.shtml http://www.aboutautomobile.com/Complaint/2010/Ford/F-150/Engine+and+Engine+Cooling+System By as usual the posters on here will say nothing could possibly be wrong with a ford.
        Dean Hammond
        • 1 Year Ago
        @JDM
        check the dates...there has been a TSB regarding condensation buildup, theres a simple fix.....and considering 15000 ecoboosts are sold on a monthly basis, I would say its a small issue, even smaller given the fix....all said the engines have been pretty stellar....
        Dean Hammond
        • 1 Year Ago
        @JDM
        it may help you JDM if you kept your comments and "backup" as relevent, the THIRD example you pasted is nothing to do with eco-boost engines at all, AND gos back to 2010.....kinda waters down your critique somewhat......
          JDM
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Dean Hammond
          I posted several above for your reading pleasure. The years include 2012/2013. Enjoy.
          Dean Hammond
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Dean Hammond
          Ive read them, pretty scary when it happens, but notice the common threads...low temps after crusing at a steady pace and then trying to overtake....and the complaints are in truly trivial numbers given the amount sold...and as mentioned Ford is aware and theres a fix, so...your point?....if they werent aware and ther was no fix, id be bashing them as unacceptable too.....
        • 1 Year Ago
        @JDM
        [blocked]
      rtttack
      • 1 Year Ago
      I don't care for lawsuit happy people, but I can't stand by the Ecoboost engines either. The EB is still basically new, but look at all the complaints and recalls for very, very similar issues. These engines have too few advantages over N/A engines in the real world, but add so much complexity to the engines. If I were buying a Ford, I wouldn't even consider an Ecoboost.
        Ajr Ajr
        • 1 Year Ago
        @rtttack
        thats the heart of the "turbo" gimmick flying around the big 3 right now. Theres nothing economical about them. And for daily driven cars of people who don't want to bother with maintenance they're a bad idea.
          carlotta
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Ajr Ajr
          Consumer Reports noted how poorly the Ecoboost Fusions did. Bottom of the class mpg and poor performance. I'll bet they'll be a maintenance and resale nightmare as well.
          Hello, Brian
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Ajr Ajr
          I am sure that you have never owned one, so I will excuse your ignorance. Most every manufacturer has seen real world mileage improvement from turbocharging smaller engines, while maintaining or even improving output. I have owned a few turbo cars, and I can say in no uncertain terms that they have offered good mileage (low to mid 30s highway) for 3200+ lbs cars, while providing great performance (all 0-60 in under 6.5 secs...and as low as 5.8). I have owned several v6s that were slower to comparable, but never got over 25 mpg. I do agree on the point about maintenance, however. Turbos are not for people who want to cheap out on fuel (always buy regular) or skip maintenance. problems caused by not following the manufacturer's maintenance specs cannot be blamed on the engines, however.
        John
        • 1 Year Ago
        @rtttack
        I drive a 2011 Mazdaspeed 3. I drive through the hills of Ohio back roads every day and if I keep my foot out of it I can easily obtain 30mpg+ (highest yet was 36mpg on back roads, hand calculated) on a car that was rated at only 25 highway. The Mazda 2.3 Turbo is essentially the same design as the 2.0 EcoBoost. Its been a fantastic vehicle with no issues. My wifes grand parents just purchase a 1.6 EcoBoost and they said it gets much better mileage than their old 3.5L v6 Malibu (easily into the mid 30's) and feels a lot quicker. Again, no issues... Turbos are the ultimate crowd pleaser, you get gobs of power when you want it but as long as you drive sensibly you're driving a small engine car that can return fantastic mileage. If anything, they're perfect for an everyday driver. As far as parts complexity, you have to keep in mind that you're only adding one moving part to the equation so essentially its a more simple design than a v6 or v8 where you're adding 2 more valve springs, retainers, locks, 4 more valves, another 2 pistons, rods, wrist pins, atleast 6 more bearings and so on. The arguement of more parts to go wrong is completely false when you compare it to the larger engine that is being replaced.
          Gorgenapper
          • 1 Year Ago
          @John
          I achieve, on average, a high of 29 - 30 MPG doing the same kind of driving in my 2010 MS3. But this is with Stage 2 hardware and tune, wider tires (235/40/18) and un-aerodynamic Rally Armor mudflaps (to prevent stone chips on the side of my car). I'm sure if I ditch the flaps, I can get another 1 - 2 MPG maybe.
      Walt
      • 1 Year Ago
      Three people file a suit and this is news? Apparently Autoblog is running low on Ford hateraid. Stick with what you do best Autoblog, endless Nissan coverage and useless YouTube videos.
      ferps
      • 1 Year Ago
      Oh boy. Another day, another Ford quality problem.
        Dean Hammond
        • 1 Year Ago
        @ferps
        yep, for three people that obviously dont have the time to take the vehicle in for a simple TSB fix, but obviously DO have the time to hire attourneys...hilarious actually.....side-note though...shouldnt this just be a lemon law issue?...in which case the dealer has the oppurtunity to attempt to rectify the issue first...
          JaredN
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Dean Hammond
          Dean: If you go over to the F150 forum, you'll see that a lot more than 3 people have this problem, and that many of them have had the TSB performed but still have problems.
      Luke
      • 1 Year Ago
      I have the 3.5L in an F150, as do several other people in our corporate fleet. We have had no issues to speak of. Considering the thousands of motors being sold and the small number of issues, this is a non-issue. It is an amazing motor. Regardless, the lawyers are the only ones making money here. Shakespeare was right.
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