For Toyota and the new version of its Auris Hybrid that goes on sale starting next month, less is more. In this case, the Auris Hybrid will get an engine that cuts emissions by more than three percent from the current version.

The Auris Hybrid that goes on sale next month will emit just 84 grams of CO2 per kilometer, down from 87 in the previous model. The Touring Sports version of the Auris Hybrid, which was first shown off in Geneva earlier this year was, in Toyota's words, the "first full hybrid estate car," and emits 85 g/km. For comparison, the European Prius emits 91 g/km in combined driving conditions.

First-quarter Auris Hybrid sales in Europe surged 69 percent from a year earlier. There are no plans to bring the model stateside. Read Toyota's press release below.
Show full PR text
Full Hybrid Delivers Sales Success And CO2 Leadership
  • Auris Hybrid now from 84g/km
  • Auris Hybrid Sports Touring from 85g/km
  • Auris Hybrid sales up 69% in first quarter 2013
Brussels, Belgium - The Auris Hybrid has received further upgrades to reduce its CO2 emissions to just 84 g/km - joining its Touring Sports sibling in segment leadership.

This CO2 reduction is achieved by refining the vehicle tuning and adopting various aerodynamic improvements such as new aero-stabilising fins. These measures combine to improve the overall energy efficiency without negatively impacting vehicle performance.

Reinforcing Toyota's commitment to continually improve the efficiency of its products, these new modifications were first previewed on the 85g/km Auris Hybrid Touring Sports when it made its debut at the Geneva Motor Show in March.

The new Auris has been very well received across Europe where demand grew by 27 year-on-year, illustrating its strong customer appeal and low cost-of-ownership credentials.

Already benefiting from significant tax incentives, restricted-area exemptions and reduced service and maintenance charges, the new lower CO2 level will further reinforce the Auris Hybrid's best-in-class low running costs.

The new 84 g/km Auris Hybrid will replace the 87 g/km version across the Toyota retailer network starting from June 2013.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 11 Comments
      transpower
      • 1 Year Ago
      But CO2 is not a problem! "Global Warming" is just another Leftist mythology. Hey, Toyota, please build a hybrid RAV4 which gets great fuel economy and does well on the skid pad!
      Hedo D
      • 1 Year Ago
      By the way, does regular Auris going to replace Matrix in US?
      Peter
      • 1 Year Ago
      So.... is a Corolla hybrid, wagon in our future or is this Europe only?
      Rotation
      • 1 Year Ago
      I don't know where these figures are from, but a regular Toyota Prius is rated at 89g/km in Europe, not 91.
        Luc K
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Rotation
        Range is 89 for base model to 92 g/km for loaded model. Agree should have taken the base model here.
      Snark McGee
      • 1 Year Ago
      the ct200h is based on the auris, right? that means there will be a new ct soon?
      Spec
      • 1 Year Ago
      I still laugh at these g/km ratings. From the US perspective, no one knows how much a gram is, no one knows what the gram is measuring, no one knows how far a kilometer is, and worst . . . no one cares about how much CO2 is created. OK, maybe I cry not laugh. :-(
        Marcopolo
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Spec
        @ Spec I realise this may come as a shock to you, but the US is only one of 193 nations !
        nbsr
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Spec
        Why does it matter? These are not US regulations. Personally, I would prefer "l/km", or maybe just "m^2". I guess they have settled on grams because on a large scale emissions are measured in tonnes.
          Joseph Brody
          • 1 Year Ago
          @nbsr
          To be a total unit snob. Tonnes is not even part of the metric system, but it is accepted anyway. Tonnes and us ton is also confused a lot also.