Subaru today announced a recall that affects 5,379 Legacy sedan and Outback wagon models in the United States. All of the affected 2013 model-year vehicles were built between February 15 and June 15 of 2012.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, "the inner and outer shafts of the steering column assembly may become disengaged from one another" in these vehicles. If that happens, the driver can lose the ability to steer the vehicle, which could obviously lead to all sorts of harmful things.

Subaru will notify owners of the problem, and affected models will have their steering columns replaced at dealerships, free of charge. Scroll down for the official NHSTA report.
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Report Receipt Date: MAY 13, 2013
NHTSA Campaign Number: 13V194000
Component(s): STEERING
Potential Number of Units Affected: 5,379
All Products Associated with this Recall

SUBARU - LEGACY - 2013
SUBARU - OUTBACK - 2013

Manufacturer: Subaru of America, Inc.

SUMMARY

Subaru is recalling certain model year 2013 Outback and Legacy vehicles manufactured from February 15, 2012, through June 15, 2012. In the affected vehicles, the inner and outer shafts of the steering column assembly may become disengaged from one another.

CONSEQUENCE

If the shafts become disengaged, the driver would lose the ability to steer the vehicle, increasing the risk of a crash.

REMEDY

Subaru will notify owners, and dealers will replace the steering column assembly with a new one, free of charge. The recall is expected to begin on, or before, May 15, 2013. Owners may contact Subaru at 1-800-782-2783. Subaru's recall campaign number is WQI-45.

NOTES

Owners may also contact the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Vehicle Safety Hotline at 1-888-327-4236 (TTY 1-800-424-9153), or go to www.safercar.gov.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 27 Comments
      mitytitywhitey
      • 1 Year Ago
      Can't imagine a more pants and armpit soiling situation than suddenly having a steering wheel that spins freely 360-degrees without changing vehicle direction.
        icemilkcoffee
        • 1 Year Ago
        @mitytitywhitey
        The steering on the Outback pretty much feels like that, even when it IS connected to the steering rack!
          erak686
          • 1 Year Ago
          @icemilkcoffee
          Soooooo completely agreed. You are a victim to the mighty force of the wind at any kind of speed... even in cars with 5 miles on them. I work at a Subaru stealership, I would know.
      rjnod80
      • 1 Year Ago
      I just bought my 3rd Subaru. 1st Outback. Each has replaced another car, we still have all 3. They seem indestructable. If they aren't the best value for the dollar on the road then they are 2nd best. Thousands less than the Toyotas and Hondas, assembled in LaFayette, IN. What's not to like? I'd reccommend either the Forester or Outback to anybody looking for a car.
      EJD1984
      • 1 Year Ago
      Steering Loss = Wheeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee
      uwil
      • 1 Year Ago
      Who says Subaru is a upstanding car manufaturer. Between 1996 to 2004 their 2.5 engines had bad head gaskets. They talked the National highway traffic safety officials into allowing them to pour watered downed Barrs leaks into the radiators as a temporary fix. Instead of Subaru replacing the head gaskets and incurring millions in losses they dumped $5.00 worth of sludge down your cooling system to postpone the expensive repair until after the warrenty expired. Right now thousands of people have to pay about $1500 to fix something Subaru should have taken care of. These are cars that can go 300,00 miles. I own 2 but I'll never buy another.
      mikemaj82
      • 1 Year Ago
      Tell you what, all car manufacturers have recall problems: Fact. But the Japanese automaker recalls are hell of a lot more dangerous than domestics...everytime.
        GR
        • 1 Year Ago
        @mikemaj82
        Really? Did you not see the Jeep Wrangler recall, Ford Fusion recall, and the Chevy Volt recall, for the FIRE risks? There, every single one from the Big 3 had a FIRE HAZARD recall in the last few years. Can't imagine much worse than being burned alive in a car or even having a car burn itself down when I'm not around. A burning car in a garage can take your whole house. Sure, Toyota has had bad recalls, but the whole unintended acceleration thing was a farce. I'll believe it once there is scientific data, evidence, and replication (very important aspect of the scientific method, mind you) etc. other than the complaints of idiotic drivers claiming their car was possessed. Toyota was even able to PROVE some of these claims were false. Some people simply want to blame others for their poor driving skills and/or want to sue a corporation and get rich.
          mikemaj82
          • 1 Year Ago
          @GR
          Did you even read about how the fires started? It's nearly impossible to happen, whereas loss of steering can occur at any time! Imagine that happening to you while you're doing 70 on the highway. At least with a fire you'll see it and be able to steer the car to the side of the road.
      FIDTRO
      • 1 Year Ago
      They start themselves AND they can't steer properly? Impeccable Japanese engineering is on a role these days.
      DyanRucar
      • 1 Year Ago
      I commend Subaru and their quick reactions to resolve any and all issues regarding their product.
      NKonline
      • 1 Year Ago
      Subaru Recall? Something you don't hear often. They must have picked a bad habit from Toyota. Haha
      Finklestein
      • 1 Year Ago
      Looks like Subaru is taking a turn for the worse...
      vaua70
      • 1 Year Ago
      it seems any car brand assembled in US including foreign and domestic always recalls
        jtav2002
        • 1 Year Ago
        @vaua70
        haha I've often thought about how the more Japanese vehicles are made here the more they seem to be recall and everyone begins to question the reliability they always had. Maybe the problem isn't these evil car companies from other countries and more our workforce here.
        GR
        • 1 Year Ago
        @vaua70
        I hate to say it, but it's actually a noticeable and even measured statistic. Made in Japan Japanese cars are better made and more reliable than their Made in USA Japanese counterparts. Despite the fact that the engineering should be the same, there is a divide in the reliability and even recalls of these cars. There must be something different whether it be the parts suppliers or the manufacturing quality control. I prefer my Japanese cars to be made in Japan. They have been rock solid and I rarely ever see the dealer or a mechanic. Really, the majority of what they need is maintenance that I do in my driveway. Heck even older Made in Japan Camrys and Accords non-car people own make it to 200,000+ miles and the owner does not even know how to check the oil. I love cars from all countries and I think US manufacturing is fine, but I believe that for the utmost in reliability and build quality, having the J as the first character of the VIN is reassurance. At least to me.
          NightFlight
          • 1 Year Ago
          @GR
          "I hate to say it, but it's actually a noticeable and even measured statistic. Made in Japan Japanese cars are better made and more reliable than their Made in USA Japanese counterparts. " Source please. This is what you call confirmation bias, I suggest you look that up. They use the same components, manufactured in the same plants.
          GR
          • 1 Year Ago
          @GR
          NightFlight, Same parts from the same sources? The 2012 Camry had more US sourced parts than the Ford F-150. The 2012 Accord had over 80% parts from US sources. You mean to tell me the Japanese reverse import parts from the US to Japan for their models built in Japan? Does not make sense. As for the source information on Japan-made vs. US-made Japanese brand cars, it was from a number of articles years ago which I could not locate from a quick google search. Sorry. But given that Japanese brands are consistently among the most reliable and of those, the made in Japan models have the highest reliability, I think the evidence is out there. Don't get me wrong. The US (including the Big 3) makes very good cars and many have proved to be reliable. But comparatively speaking, the data out there seems to show that Made in Japan vehicles are the top at reliability. Though not statistically relevant, my personal experience with Japan-made Japanese vehicles have also supported this, especially in comparison to non-Japan made vehicles owned by co-workers, friends, family, etc. Oh, and the Legacy and Outback? Made in USA. Let's find these problems on Made in Japan models like the BRZ and Impreza.
      inkedbiker74
      • 1 Year Ago
      The Problem with American Cars ex GM is their Union Employees who could care less. They are more worried about showing up for a 8 hour shift and physically only working 1 hour while they sit and play cards, take naps on their cots, read the newspaper... all as the cars come down the assembly line, but when that union whistle blows, they stop working because their break time is more important that building or designing something of quality. It's more about who works harder and smarter vs to the lazy americans who don't take pride in actually having a job, they are more concerned about doing nothing and expecing more, and yes I'm an American and ashamed of other Americans lazy work ethincs. Perhaps the American Auto manufactures could look better if they took pride vs to asking the government for a hand out to keep their plants open.
      Jaybird248
      • 1 Year Ago
      And just how did they find out about this little problem?
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