nissan leaf taxi mexico city
  • nissan leaf taxi mexico city
  • nissan leaf taxi mexico city
  • nissan leaf taxi mexico city
  • nissan leaf taxi mexico city
  • nissan leaf taxi mexico city
  • nissan leaf taxi mexico city
  • nissan leaf taxi mexico city
  • nissan leaf taxi mexico city
  • nissan leaf taxi mexico city
  • nissan leaf taxi mexico city
  • nissan leaf taxi mexico city
  • nissan leaf taxi mexico city
  • nissan leaf taxi mexico city
  • nissan leaf taxi mexico city
  • nissan leaf taxi mexico city
  • nissan leaf taxi mexico city
  • nissan leaf taxi mexico city
  • nissan leaf taxi mexico city
  • nissan leaf taxi mexico city
  • nissan leaf taxi mexico city
When you're in the lead, everyone can see the target on your back. When you're in front and talking about how much faster you could go, then it can seem like you're setting up your own stumbling blocks.

That's one way to look at the electric vehicle work that Renault and Nissan are doing as they handily outsell their competitors when it comes to pure EVs. In February, Nissan announced it had sold well over 50,000 Leafs around the world and that number has grown to 62,000 by now. Automotive News Europe recently tallied up Renault's all-electric vehicle sales from the launch of the various models through April 2013 and found the company has sold 24,688 in total (Twizy: 9,911; Kangoo Z.E.: 8,760; Fluence Z.E.: 3,487; Zoe: 2,530). So, let's call it almost 90,000 EVs by now for both companies. That's a lot, but Renault-Nissan chief Carlos Ghosn – and here's where the self-inflicted wounds come in – had to admit to the press recently that his companies probably won't hit the original target of selling a combined 1.5 million EVs by 2016.

Ghosn remains confident as ever in the long term potential for EVs, saying earlier this year that, "we know this is a breakthrough technology, we know [the Leaf] is a breakthrough car, and we're just going to have to be extremely patient and resilient and remove the obstacles one after another."

One of those obstacles is getting people used to EVs, and that means getting butts in seats. This is why the company is working on an electric vehicle taxi project in Mexico City, where a huge charging warehouse can charge 50 Leafs at once, the most in all of Latin America. The Mexico City Leaf taxi project has been in the works since 2010, and the first EVs were delivered in October 2011. There are two Nissan-supplied videos about the Mexico City trials available below.


Show full PR text
Growing the Grid: EV Taxis Drive Infrastructure Transformation in Mexico, Latin America

MEXICO CITY – The fully electric Nissan LEAF has been zooming across the country of Mexico for months now. So far, only taxi drivers and government officials in Mexico City and in Aguascalientes are driving them. But soon those in Mexico who want to drive a 100 percent pure electric car will be able to buy the Nissan LEAF. That is why the company is working hard to get more electric vehicle charging infrastructure in place.

There now is a charging center in Aguascalientes that services the 50 Nissan LEAF taxis in the area. There are also two quick chargers, one in the heart of Mexico City and another in the city of Aguascalientes, both for public use.

Nissan officials say they hope to expand taxi programs, and public charging, like this to other cities and other countries in Latin America.

"Aguascalientes has been the benchmark on those (EV taxis), Mexico City as well. And there are a lot of other requests from other countries. Colombia has been pushing very hard requesting a lot of vehicles," said Jorge Vallejo, Nissan Mexicana's director of Government Affairs. He added: "We are creating the first electric corridor in the entire Latin America region. It's going to run from Mexico City up to Cuernavaca where we (Nissan) have another manufacturing facility."

The Nissan LEAF will go on sale at dealerships in Mexico late this year.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 11 Comments
      KenZ
      • 2 Years Ago
      Well, I still gotta say I love Nissan/Ghosn for what they've done. Sure the battery thing bit them in AZ, but in two, three years that'll be ancient history as they come up with ways to mitigate, possibly even creating some IP in the process (pure speculation of course). They jumped in head first, boldly, confidently, and I hope it pays off for them in the long run. They deserve it. For "regular" cars (other than the stuff coming out in the last six months) we've got the Leaf as an excellent (come on, admit it) small "economy" EV with "good enough" range, the Volt with just about exactly the right mix of electric range, and the Tesla to push the high end. Those three cars alone cover almost the entire spectrum of what should be covered. Of course we'd all like it if they were all half the cost, but they're not, and they can't be right now. So when it comes to Nissan (and GM, and Tesla), I'm pretty proud of them all.
      purrpullberra
      • 2 Years Ago
      This shows that Nissan can't even meet their own needs as far as CARB ZEV credits, right? So even Nissan will need to buy credits like the ones Tesla has for sale, right? How much time and money has Nissan invested into its engineering and manufacturing to get to this point and out to 2016? Is any other company close to making the size commitment to match or best Nissan? Nope. GM, a bit. BMW, a bit. Toyota hybrids and (Ford's too) are smaller in scope. So it will be much longer than 2016 before anyone gets to where Nissan is as far as providing for themselves. Tesla's credits are going to be valuable for a long time. Someone who disagrees with this should try to use the real numbers CARB requires and the real-world production numbers, with honest projections, like the companies least ambitious hopes instead of invented numbers. If no one can fulfill their own needs where else are they going to get the ZEV credits they need? Not just ZEV credits are required too, hybrids and other Volt-like cars are required too, remember that.
        Marcopolo
        • 2 Years Ago
        @purrpullberra
        @ purrpullberra I don't agree with those who down voted you. All well made EV technology is good, as it conditions the market to accept greater degrees of electrification. However, CARB credits and other subsidies, are good to help EV technology in it's early stages, but sooner or later these schemes must end. When they do, EV's will have to become competitive in their own right . Hopefully by that time, ESD's will have advanced to the point where the EV, is simply a better vehicle.
      Spec
      • 2 Years Ago
      Well, they are obviously not going to come close to that target. But on the other hand, they've established a lead for themselves in the EV field, have learned valuable lessons, and are in good position to be a market leader in this growing field. Tesla has shown that EVs can be a success and profitable. But that Mexico City Taxi project? That could be disaster in the making. Are they going to fast-charge in a hot location with batteries that have already proven to not do well in the heat? Good luck with that.
        Ernie Dunbar
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Spec
        That's what I was thinking. "Oh yeah, where is there a hotter climate than in Arizona to host a public relations project?" Yup. Mexico.
        Actionable Mango
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Spec
        Also I assume frequent fast charging isn't too great for the batteries. Then again, is Mexico City flat and heavily congested? Maybe with slow speed city driving they can get by a whole day without topping up at a fast charger.
        gpmp
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Spec
        At 8.000' elevation Mexico City has a milder climate than Los Angeles and with the air pollution problem they have, it's an excellent city to prove the value of EV's.
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Spec
        Uh, Mexico City is 2,241 m (7,352 ft) above sea level. The average annual temperature ranges from 12 to 16 °C (54 to 61 °F). It gets below freezing during the winter. It isn't much warmer than San Francisco, and gets more rain. (I was in Aguascalientes last week. Rode taxis three times, didn't get an electric one.)
      Marcopolo
      • 2 Years Ago
      I really hope that Carlos Ghosn's tenacity pays off eventually. Even for a huge conglomerate like the Renault-Nissan alliance, the capital investment commitment to it's EV programme is really courageous. Carlos Ghosn must also rely on continuing government support, especially in France and Japan, without the very generous subsidies from Japan, Leaf sales would be less than 50%. In France, Ghosn must have been relieved at the election of the socialist Industry Minister Arnaud Montebourg, a staunch supporter of subsidies for French industry. Carlos Ghosn is a very remarkable industrialist, with a tremendous capacity to survive set-backs that would make lesser men falter and retreat !
        Thereminator
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Marcopolo
        Indeed! Industrial visionaries like Ghosn,Musk and others are made of better stuff...and we are better off for that as they begin the ending of the gas ceiling.
        Gabbo
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Marcopolo
        Ghosn, Ghosn, Gone ! I think he looks like Mr. Bean, and is grasping at straws with the EV push, to make up for lack of gravitas in his product line.