Consumers now have some real choices for deals on electric vehicle chargers, whether exploring options through Home Depot, setting up an all-in-one package when buying their EV or going with Bosch for the cheapest Level 2 home charging station on the market.

Bosch Automotive Service Solutions is now offering Power Max, the automotive industry's first EV charging station that costs less than $450, about half the cost of other 240-volt units currently on the market.

Bosch used its expertise and experience in home appliances and automotive solutions when designing the Bosh Power Max, which is UL-certified in both the US and Canada. Formerly called SPX Service Solutions, Bosch Automotive Service Solutions has supplied more than 16,000 EV charging stations and had made more than 6,000 installations including the SPX Power Xpress.

Power Max has been designed to work with all the EVs on the market, and comes in 16 amp and 30 amp configurations. Features include no-touch operation to simply the process from plugging in to walking away; NEMA 3R enclosure for both indoor and outdoor applications; visible LED indicator for gauging charging status; and a hardwired on/off switch to completely shut off power to the unit when needed. Bosch is taking orders now and will begin shipping in early June.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 33 Comments
      Aaron
      • 1 Year Ago
      Of COURSE this came out one month after I purchased my EVSE. Oh well...
        Spiffster
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Aaron
        I bought mine a month ago too. 850 bones for a Siemens 30A. It has a nice delayed charge start feature though, I can even adjust the amperage (not sure why I would ever do that though). I like Bosch though... bummer this was a month too late.
          Spiffster
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Spiffster
          Just to clarify, I really like this Siemens charger and I would recommend it if this one wasnt so much cheaper.
      Mike G
      • 1 Year Ago
      The Clipper Creek LCS 25 is in the same price range ($600) and is smaller I'm going to put it between two of my garage doors. It's 25 amps so kind of the middle between these two. I have a RAV4 EV being shipped out from California that should arrive today! And to DFs comments: In the US 220 volts does not typically have a GFI so it makes sense that the box would have one for safety. Eventually we will see a model like the hairdryer where the plug has all the electronics and is very small. And this is probably a US only thing too but 220 volts seems scary when you are used to 110.
        alvord
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Mike G
        LCS-25 is only 20 amps.
        Rotation
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Mike G
        The GFI in an EVSE is more sensitive than a wall one anyway. It's needed for safety either way. That's crazy you put in a small charger for the RAV4 EV. You're only going to be adding like 10 miles per hour of charging.
      sebringc5
      • 1 Year Ago
      I applaud the effort! Keep in mind however this is a smaller 15A model. Upgrading to the 30A model will still reflect a good price @ $600.00. All the best, Aaron Lephart www.smartcar451.com
      paulwesterberg
      • 1 Year Ago
      Bosch will begin taking advance orders today; customers can call 877.805.3873 to place an order. The Power Max will begin shipping in early June, with initial customers receiving their charging station in late June to early July. No mention on whether it is hard-wired to the power source or offers a 220v plug like many Leviton models.
        paulwesterberg
        • 1 Year Ago
        @paulwesterberg
        Actually these chargers are hardwired... Not that they couldn't be hardwired to a 220 plug, but that may void your warranty. This site has more information about the chargers: http://www.pluginnow.com/charging_stations
      Giza Plateau
      • 1 Year Ago
      The smart way to do this glorified extension cord is to use a normal extension cord that plugs into a wall socket and have the relay and the signal circuit inside the J1772 handle you plug into the car... Dare to think
        Rotation
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Giza Plateau
        No, that's not the smart way. The interrupter (relay as you call it) cannot protect anything that is upstream of it. That is, if you put the relay in the handle, then a short develops in the cord, there is no protection, because the relay cannot interrupt the power to the cord, only the circuit in the handle So the interrupter must be as close to the wall socket as possible. You can see this if you have a recent hair dryer. They have a GFI breaker in the cord and the GFI breaker is in the plug itself. It would be cheaper and more Giza-smart to put it in the hair dryer instead, but they cannot do this because then it doesn't provide any protection. Same with an EVSE.
          Giza Plateau
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Rotation
          mustang, I haven't studied it in great detail but I have checked a couple of professional J1772 cables and they did have 5 wires. How many do you think it should have and why?
          Giza Plateau
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Rotation
          Hehe the EV plug alliance? do they also have an EV plug police? : ) first of all I doubt you could quote such a declaration from them and second, what they think really doesn't matter one tiny bit. http://www.plugincars.com/curious-what-750-gets-you-pics-guts-nissan-leafs-charge-station-106524.html
          Giza Plateau
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Rotation
          Here in DK we have various safeties like GFI in the house box, not in the individual devices. Even if you wanted a GFI and you reason for putting it near the outlet was valid then you could still do that while having the J1772 functionality in the J1772 connector and still use a standard 2 lead cord instead of the 5 lead J1772 cord. And I wouldn't put GFI in it. And your reason isn't valid. A short in the cable is not a ground fault event. And when I say relay I mean relay, not GFI. J1772 protocol involves electronically turning the power on and off, that's what the relay is for.
          Rotation
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Rotation
          I don't care what you call your relay. I referred to it as a interrupter, meaning the device which breaks the circuit if there is determined to be a reason to do so (including safety). And the GFI on the hair dryer was just an example. You see I did not mention GFI in the EVSE portion. I just figured the idea that in order to interrupt current in a cable the interrupter must be between the cable and the supply would be better explained by you to show an example of the hair dryer. You say a "normal extension cord". You do not have an interrupter near the wall socket on a "normal extension cord". When I said short, I meant a short to anything. A short to ground (i.e. a frayed cord and a puddle of water), a short to the other conductor or neutral is also a short. I don't know how you're going to get down to a 2 lead cord given a J1772 EVSE requires two power wires (one which may be neutral) and a ground. By moving the GFI to a separate box at the plug you will be able to remove the two smaller wires (control pilot and proximity detection) but those aren't the big ones anyway. You add cost with the separate box and make it tougher to plug in the unit to certain plugs, by having a big box up near the plug. The standards for charging (EV Plug alliance) do not allow an EVSE to rely on the wall plug or infrastructure to provide the GFI protection, the EVSE must provide it.
          mustang_sallad
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Rotation
          Giza - if you think there are 5 leads in the J1772 cord just because you see 5 pins in the coupler, that tells me you haven't even read the J1772 standard, and therefore you're not really in a good position to question it's existence.
          Rotation
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Rotation
          Yeah, they do matter. You make a J1772 EVSE, it has to meet their requirements or you are going to at a lot of trouble selling it (at the least). Your argument is "the smart way" to do it would be to do it a way that doesn't meet the requirements. No, that's not smart. I have no idea why you link that picture. Note in that picture the charger has 3 input wires as I said. You cannot use a "normal extension cord" because it doesn't have an interruptor ahead of the cord. You made false assertions. Stop pretending you didn't.
      Levine Levine
      • 1 Year Ago
      $450 for the 16A only or 30A also?
        MTN RANGER
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Levine Levine
        30A with 18' cord is $593. 30A with 25' cord is $749. The base with 12' is pathetically short. I have 18' with my EVSE mounted on the wall between two cars. In my case, 18' seems adequate to avoid tripping issues. http://www.pluginnow.com/charging_stations
        Rotation
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Levine Levine
        $450 for 16A only. 12' cord.
          otiswild
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Rotation
          That needs to be about $150 cheaper. Heck, my 60A EVSE was $800 including shipping..
      Giza Plateau
      • 1 Year Ago
      450$ for an extension cord. It's a steal
        Jim McL
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Giza Plateau
        Calling an EVSE an "extension cord" is like calling a catalytic converter a muffler. Or calling a Ground Fault Interrupter a simple outlet. Or saying an air bag is a glorified grocery bag. The connector to the car from an EVSE is un-powered until it is connected to the vehicle. This is a preventative safety measure, which compliments the mitigation measures of a GFI. It also checks for reversed Hot-Neutral wiring, another safety measure. It also tells the car how much power it can draw without tripping the circuit breaker. For those of us that used to trip breakers routinely and know how hard it can be to find the breaker in a strange place, this is a major convenience of modern EVSEs. You sound like the sort of person who removes the safety ground prong from your appliance's plug and drives without a seatbelt. The industry wants to see the ongoing decline in accidental electric shocks continue, despite the introduction of high power electrical connectors that will be used outdoors on a daily basis even in the rain. The only way to keep a decreasing rate of electrical shocks as EVs get more popular is to use the best, state-of-the-cost-effective-art safety technology. Go hug your EVSE, it is your friend.
          VL00
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Jim McL
          Jim, it is a glorified extension cord. Have you ever seen the guts of the GM Level 2 charger? Its a tiny circuit board and a relay. When you build one yourself, the freaking 1772 plug is the most expensive part - even though it should cost about $5
          Giza Plateau
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Jim McL
          If only it could warn you against your status quo mindlessness. All this glorified extension cord does is send a signal about the powerlevel and a relay to turn the power on an off, much like your wall switches do. And of course the reason it is dropping in price from 3000$ to 1000$ to 500$ is that it is exactly as I say, a glorified extension cord and a product of wicked greed and poor minds stuck in gas pump 'thinking'. And weak minds defend it.
          Rotation
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Jim McL
          VL00: When you make it yourself only one part is tested, warrantied and covered for liability if it fails. And it's the most expensive part. Hmm, maybe not a coincidence? There's more to making an EVSE than just soldering it together.
        kubel
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Giza Plateau
        The cost in parts to build your own "extension cord" with all the necessary safety features (using OpenEVSE) is around $300-$500. $450 is competitive. I think it's a good price for a 30A with a 25 foot cordset, but I think it can go down a bit more for a 16A 15 footer.
      MTN RANGER
      • 1 Year Ago
      Since Bosch purchased SPX a little while ago, this is little more than a refreshed $490 Voltec 240V EVSE. It has a new enclosure, but the guts are probably the same. I would be wary since the GM-Volt board has had many reliabilty issues with that unit. At least they upgraded to a straight cable from the Power Xpress. The coiled cable is a PITA. Also, I would stay away from 16A units since they are pretty much outdated with most new PEVs supporting 30-32A capability.
      Smoking_dude
      • 1 Year Ago
      Ironically, as bosch is a german company, this device is nonexistent on the german market. the only device bosch sells is a vacuum cleaner named power max.
      Rotation
      • 1 Year Ago
      How much for the 30A? 16A is functionally obsolete. The SPX was not a very good unit. I would hope Bosch would fix it before slapping their name on.
        Rotation
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Rotation
        Hmm. 12' cord too. Well, it's a basic price, I guess I should expect a basic price. This isn't really for me though. I'd rather have the Schneider Electric at 18' and 30A before I considered this. And I like my Leviton a lot.
          Rotation
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Rotation
          Whoops, that sentence should be "Well, it's a basic price, I guess I should expect basic capability."
        Spec
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Rotation
        "16A is functionally obsolete" Yeah, the EV i have right now has a very wimpy charger but I made sure to get a 30Amp 240V charger for a future EV.
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