An official with the transport ministry in Japan has some stern words for Mitsubishi, taking the carmaker to task for not being more proactive and honest about its recalls. An investigation into The Tri-Star last December found Mitsubishi was tardy investigating problems and didn't explain itself forthrightly to the transport ministry about the issues. None of Mitsubishi's actions were illegal, and we should stress that this is a dialogue with Mitsubishi in Japan, not Mitsubishi Motors North America.

The official advised the automaker to, "Come up with plans for improvement, implement them and report them to the ministry." It looks like the company will get more practice than it wants in that department, having to announce another recall for the Outlander PHEV over software and hardware glitches. Those recalls come just after Mitsu finally figured out the problem with overheating lithium-ion batteries that caused a production halt of the plug-in hybrid SUV.


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  • 14 Comments
      reattadudes
      • 2 Years Ago
      its rather odd that the Japanese government chooses to go public with this issue now, as Mitsubishi's issue with ignoring problems and refusing to issue recalls goes all the way back to the 70s. less than 20 years ago, they had major issues with their Fuso medium duty trucks and buses having brake failures, killing hundreds of people. the Japanese government ignored the problem for over ten years, until public outcry forced it out into the open. none of these issues could have ever been hidden without coverups and payoffs by Mitsubishi that went to the highest levels in the Japanese Government. facts like this shock many Americans, but graft and corruption are "business as usual" in Japan, and many other countries. Japan is not a consumer-protected country, and Japan has no consumer protection agency of any kind. corporations are king, and are ALWAYS right.
        Mr.Roadrage
        • 2 Years Ago
        @reattadudes
        less than 20 years ago, they had major issues with their Fuso medium duty trucks and buses having brake failures, killing hundreds of people No! It was thousands! Millions!
        Tourian
        • 2 Years Ago
        @reattadudes
        Never heard that it killed hundreds. What report are you looking at?
      strykerzzzz
      • 2 Years Ago
      Of the smaller Japanese automakers, I respect Mitsubishi and Subaru, because they have kept their factories open in America and still employ people here. I do not respect Mazda, because they shut down their U.S. operations, laid off the workers and are now building a factory in Mexico. Mazda lost me when they did that - it's like spit in the face to the U.S. worker. Some people go out of their way to buy cars that are not built by Americans, so Mazda must be tailoring to that crowd now. Mitsubishi cars are actually very highly rated by Consumer Reports for their reliability and the Outlander Sport (built in the U.S.) recently won the Automotive Science Group Award for best overall small SUV on the market today. The Outlander Sport SE AWD is also the only SUV listed in the 2013 Consumer Reports car buying guide for the best picks in the "under $25,000" category. I think Mitsubishi has a marketing problem here in the United States that they need to overcome. Overall, MItsubishi is posting good profits worldwide these days, but they need to build more to tastes in the U.S. to survive here. For starters, they need to change the front grill of the new 2014 Outlander back to the Lancer jet fighter grill, instead of the new look. Maybe I'm out in left field with that opinion, but the new front grill just looks odd and will take away from all of the good changes that they made throughout the rest of the vehicle.
      Tourian
      • 2 Years Ago
      The Tri-Star? Why do writers try so hard to come up with cute pet names for Mitsubishi? The name means three diamonds, not stars. It isn\'t the Diamond-Star company either. The vehicle has problems because of the batteries. The batteries come from the same company that makes the batteries that is keeping the Boeing Dreamliners grounded.
      GoBolts
      • 2 Years Ago
      This makes me question Mitsubishi\'s claim that their tubes at the San Onofre Nuclear Power plant in California are really safe. The plant was shut down because they were having problems, but now Southern California Edison wants to put it back online. Could it lead to another Chernobyl disaster? Man, that\'s a scary thought, especially because I live within 60 miles of it.
        loka
        • 2 Years Ago
        @GoBolts
        Mitsubishi Automobile and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries are two separate company.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      Bill Burke
      • 2 Years Ago
      Mitsubishi, as a car company, has been in a slow decline after the breakup with Chrysler. Although the two companies came up with a few very good products, neither had the depth of resources to make the alliance really work. Chrysler has found Fiat, and the merger seems to be working well for both as Fiat has a lot to offer and Chrysler has always been just short of being more than competitive across the market range with one or two "best in class" vehicles among a few also ran offerings. Right now the "Three Diamond" company has nothing to offer in a merger and I believe they will sell off their commercial vehicle operations and slowly go off into the sun set. I also believe that the Japanese automotive ranks will be thinned out some more as American and other Asian companies eat into their market.
        Tourian
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Bill Burke
        You have a unique view of history and events. Mitsubishi propped up Chryslers small and medium car program. Chrysler owes their existence to them. Then Daimler showed up and raided both companies. Now Mitsubishi is back under Japanese control. It doesn\'t take very long to screw something up, it takes a lot longer to fix it. Just because one niche vehicle that happens to be unique in the marketplace is having some issues doesn\'t mean they are doomed. And they don\'t need to merge with anyone.
        chanonissan
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Bill Burke
        Since the break up with Chrysler, Mitsubishi now have several commitments with their long time friend Nissan. Nissan gives tech to Mitsubishi and Nissan uses there electric part in their vehicles.They uses a lot of rebadge Nissan in other parts of the world. And they have a mini car plant joint venture ,R&D, that develop small cars for both companies. Jatco the transmission maker is own by Mitsubishi, Suzuki and Nissan.
      FIDTRO
      • 2 Years Ago
      What is it with Asian automakers and recall incompetence? First Crapdai, and now Mitsubishi.
      Bryan Lund
      • 2 Years Ago
      I think you Mitsu-haters are so full of Charles Barkley and Dennis Rodman that your eyes are turning brown. Mitsubishi engines and powertrains are sure and solid. My 2008 Mitsubishi Lancer GTS in Rallly Red is the only car on the planet I really wish to own and I do own it. Great car that I\'m proud to have. All of your opinions on Mitsubishi and their fate add up to a big bag of dirty NBA playoff socks that need washing. And that\'s all. Later, haters. Enjoy your Chevy Cobalts.
      Jasonn
      • 2 Years Ago
      I have a buddy that owns a Mitsubishi dealer. He has been trying for the past year to sell it, "give it away" as he says it, but nobody wants it. Not that its hard to wonder why...
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